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Thread: Bleeding Halibut

  1. #1
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    Default Bleeding Halibut

    Do you need to bleed a halibut before you filet? If so, what if you don't?

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    You don't need to, but I always do. Bleeding fish will help it keep in the freezer longer and will give it a fresher, less "fishy" taste. I bleed all of my fish first.

  3. #3
    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Default always best to bleed fish

    otherwise the blood starts to "turn" first, and can give off flavors to the fish also. it is much less messy to fillet fish that have been bled properly.
    just cut a gill arch, or "stick" it behind the frenum, just above the ventral fins and cut the big artery that is there. real gusher when you get it perfect.
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  4. #4
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    Default Seward

    I was fishing Resurrection Bay on Friday and I caught a 74# Butt with my salmon rod (25# test) on a jig. Grrrrreat Fight! We forgot to bleed it and the filets aren't nice and white as usual.

  5. #5

    Default tail

    I was fishing out of Homer with friends last year and a guy I was with cut the tails off to bleed them. It really gushed all the blood out, made a mess, and I think it bleed them better, but does not make for a very good picture without the tail.
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  6. #6

    Default

    Just cut a couple of gills free at the bottom end. Do it right away after you've whacked them on the head, so that their heart continues beating and pumps out the blood.

  7. #7

    Default Bleeding

    I cut the gills. If you cut and break the tail also it will let more blood out but could let bacteria in. So far I have not had a problem.

  8. #8

    Default

    I also stick the heart, pretty simple, easier then cutting gills and you'll still have a nice photo to boot. Same thing, do it right and they'll gush, do it wrong and they'll trickle.

    Also bleed all my salmon. Roof of the mouth where the last gill raker comes in, you'll see a V and then the upper palate of the mouth. Stick your knife angled back right there, typically I use a lil red bicky to do both buts and salmon. Works like a champ! (halibut you cut right behind the gills, not in the roof of the mouth as mentioned above).

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NORTH2AK View Post
    Do you need to bleed a halibut before you filet? If so, what if you don't?

    A processor we use for halibut gave us these tips.

    Bleed the halibut via gill cutting.
    Don't carry them by the tail, only the head.
    Store them WHITE side UP.

    They said this will give you the best chance at quality meat.

    That's the philosophy friends and I have used for keeping halibut until processing.

  10. #10

    Default cutting gills

    Cutting the gills gets the job done. Just do it right after bringing the fish aboard and put it on ice. Breaking the backbone at the tail releases some spinal fluid into the meat that gives it a yellow tint.. I have cut a notch out of the tail where that artery is located and that also bled them really well.

  11. #11
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Default

    I do it with all fish.
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