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Thread: Aluminum vs Fiberglass

  1. #1
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Default Aluminum vs Fiberglass


    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKBassking View Post
    Yeah pretty quiet around here we needed something to stir the pot..............sounds like a rather biased "opinion" to me.
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
    TR

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Definately an opinionated article with many 1/2 truths and old wives tails.

    Simply put you can build an excellent boat from aluminum, fiberglass or wood. You can also build a poor boat from those materials. If you maintain the boat it will serve you well for many years. If you neglect the boat, you will have problems. You can sink a boat made from any material and no matter what it's made from it will take copious infusions of cash to make it go.

    Let me know where I can buy a 28' aluminum pnw boat for 70% the cost of a glass boat
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post

    Let me know where I can buy a 28' aluminum pnw boat for 70% the cost of a glass boat
    Here ya go....lol

    "– Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Thought I would post something to stir the pot a little to wake you'll up! Start gaining daylight on Sunday!!

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKBassking View Post
    Thought I would post something to stir the pot a little to wake you'll up! Start gaining daylight on Sunday!!
    Both have advantages and disadvantages. Talking to one of the biggest boat brokers here in AK, I was told that Aluminum/4-Stroke has the highest demand for sport boats. Fiberglass with an I/O has the lowest. If I were in the market for a sport boat, I'd be tempted to rebuild an older Osprey or Seasport, and run a whaletail with a v-6 4-Stroke. Seems that a number of the older glass boats with 'glass over wood construction in the transoms and other structural components can get water intrusion and rot. It' fixable, but you need to make sure you price it into your offer.

    If I was down in TX or Fl, you'd see me in a 'glass rig with 4 Stroke power. Up in Ak, I like Aluminum skiffs, and fiberglass commercial displacement boats.

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    I worked on boats on a lake for 16+ years or more .
    I worked 2 different marinas with every kind of boat available .
    The article seemed to have most things in place alright .
    Most things depend on the abuse one puts it through .
    Adding more load to the boat ,a bigger motor rougher water and all , have a factor in it's life.
    Break
    Out
    Another
    Thousand

    Boat = A hole in the water you throw money into.

    My first Job was rigging new boats, Motors to the drivers seat, biminy to transducer ,bow to stern I did it all ,new and old and very old and movie props as well .
    If it floats I built it modified it and rescued it from the bottom of the lake.
    Aluminum boats are frail due to fatigue .I did plenty of welding on them every season all winter long.
    Glass repairs to boats and wave runners (we had rental fleets )
    If people can break it I got to fix it.
    Professional repairs on glass are expensive ,matching the gelcoat and such , but in a rental fleet no one much cares long as it floats.
    So far as aluminum and water ,, Zinc anodes really do their job, if installed properly.
    If your not going to do it right, don't a waste the time.
    Even the factory screws up sometimes.
    I have dealt with riveted aluminum boats ,and the rubber does dry out unless you leave water in the boat all the time.
    People have tried silicone glues but some have citric acid and do more damage than help.
    Welding works, but like was said , the lack of flex eventually get's to the metal.
    I have seen severe electrolysis due to an extension cord dropped in the water, we lost a lot of props that way.
    My old boss restores Chris Craft wood boats during the winter for customers , it's expensive and they are designed to sink literally. they are an expensive hobby.
    I have 3 boats of my own now; a Glastron , an aluminum fishing boat 14' , a glass/foam fishing boat 12', and a snark (doesn't count as a boat)
    Had I the means of making any thing I want , in stead of a boat I'd build a hover craft , but not like any thing else that has been made.
    I think that manufacturers actually hope on their stuff breaking down eventually, and the only way around it is to be nicer to it than they expect.
    On the aluminum boats I was wondering if a spray on bed liner material might be durable enough to stand up internally or externally or both.
    Just a thought.

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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    I was with you until you got to the rubber drying out......

    Quote Originally Posted by Arleigh View Post
    I have dealt with riveted aluminum boats ,and the rubber does dry out unless you leave water in the boat all the time.
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
    TR

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    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    I think it all has to do with: What are going to do with your boat? Aluminum boats are great as weekeners and beaching in PWS or the Inside passage. I still have my Wooly for fishing and running skinny water. But as most can tell, we just purchased a glass boat in which we paln to cruies the inside passage and up to PWS.

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
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    I remember a line from a poster on this forum a few years back!....."a fiberglass boat will get heavier, and the aluminum will get lighter-- in time!!.."........

    29' Wooldridge Pilot House, Twin 200 Hp Etecs! "...Pez Gordo..."
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    At last count I have owned 13 boats over the years. I'm going to be 39 in 2 weeks, so I guess that breaks down to an average of one every three years, though I didn't get my first one until I was about 12.

    Currently I am running a 32 foot Trojan Sedan, which is in my avatar, and I also have a little Ski Nautique for playing with.

    One thing I know about when it comes to glass versus aluminum hulls is that, as was mentioned in a post above, aluminum is much better suited for situations where you might want to beach your vessel. A keel guard can be somewhat helpful in that situation if you have a glass hull, but even so, the aluminum hull will take less damage from repeated beachings.

    Eventually all boats need refitting. Doesn't matter what they are made of. My Trojan is a 1978 model year, and has had a laundry list of work done on her over the years to keep her looking and functioning good. The front decks have been recored, the bottom has been painted and scraped more times than I know about, I put GFI's and LED lighting in, its had 3 sets of exhaust manifolds, risers, and elbows since it left the factory, electronic distributors were installed in 2013, the list goes on and on. If it was an aluminum boat, at this age, it also would have had a lot of those things done, and where I wasn't doing glass work, I'd be doing metal work.

    Its a labor of love no matter what you own.

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    The one thing I wanted to remember to say is that glass boats with damage have to dry out a lot before you can do a real repair.
    Fresh water is bad enough to wait for drying out , I don't know how bad salt water is on fibre glass behind the gelcoat. it's can't be pretty.
    Aluminum boat repairs can be very fast and simple with out near the hassle.
    Something to think about.

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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SockeyeOne View Post

    Currently I am running a 32 foot Trojan Sedan, which is in my avatar,

    Its a labor of love no matter what you own.
    Trojans look like a nice boat, this one sold recently, seemed like a deal, what do you like about it?

    http://juneau.craigslist.org/bod/4237743293.html
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
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    Member SockeyeOne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Akgramps View Post
    Trojans look like a nice boat, this one sold recently, seemed like a deal, what do you like about it?

    http://juneau.craigslist.org/bod/4237743293.html
    That one is very much like mine. I can tell from the pictures that one is between 1973 and 1977 model years.

    I like the build quality. The one I have now is my second one. Both of the ones I have had were/are F-32 Sedan models. I have a few options not on the one in your ad such as an enclosed forward stateroom and in 1978 they updated the lower helm.

    Very heavy woven roving construction. Solid white oak stringers. Excellent use of space in the layout. Wide 13 foot beam. High zinc content gelcoat. Fantastic maneuverability. The whole package just works very well for me.

    Feel free to PM me if you'd like to discuss the topic further. I have tons of pics.

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    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Akgramps View Post
    Trojans look like a nice boat, this one sold recently, seemed like a deal, what do you like about it?

    http://juneau.craigslist.org/bod/4237743293.html
    funny how they almost never post pictures of the engines, trans & electric in those ads ???

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    Quote Originally Posted by SockeyeOne View Post
    That one is very much like mine. I can tell from the pictures that one is between 1973 and 1977 model years.

    I like the build quality. The one I have now is my second one. Both of the ones I have had were/are F-32 Sedan models. I have a few options not on the one in your ad such as an enclosed forward stateroom and in 1978 they updated the lower helm.

    Very heavy woven roving construction. Solid white oak stringers. Excellent use of space in the layout. Wide 13 foot beam. High zinc content gelcoat. Fantastic maneuverability. The whole package just works very well for me.

    Feel free to PM me if you'd like to discuss the topic further. I have tons of pics.
    Don't take this the wrong way but from your posted location has the boat ever seen salt water ???

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    Quote Originally Posted by potbuilder View Post
    Don't take this the wrong way but from your posted location has the boat ever seen salt water ???
    My particular one hasn't, but i know a gal in Sitka with an F-30, and a fella in Whittier who has one just like mine. I also know several folks on both coasts who have 32's & 36's.

    Don't take this the wrong way, but, do you have a point?

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    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    My inlaws just replaced their 31' Uniflite but we kept it in the water year round in Juneau, and the inboard 350s looked brand new yet we repowered it in 1999. That boat that just sold was also at the same marina as ours (Fishermen's Bend). We kept a plug in electric heater between the engines year round and that is all that was needed to keep the engines looking (and operating) like new. That is the beauty of inboards. That Trojan also got used year round which helps in keeping boats looking good.

    Sobie2

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    Quote Originally Posted by SockeyeOne View Post
    My particular one hasn't, but i know a gal in Sitka with an F-30, and a fella in Whittier who has one just like mine. I also know several folks on both coasts who have 32's & 36's.

    Don't take this the wrong way, but, do you have a point?
    Yeah your in upper NY state telling folks what they need for a boat in Alaska. No big deal just wondering !!

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    Quote Originally Posted by potbuilder View Post
    Yeah your in upper NY state telling folks what they need for a boat in Alaska.
    Something wrong with that? Is your water less wet there?

    I was answering a question someone asked me about what I liked about my boat. I'm certainly not telling anyone what they 'need'. I fail to see the relevance or constructiveness of your comments.

    Troll someone else.

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