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Thread: experiences with the 416 remington on bears both black and brown

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    Default experiences with the 416 remington on bears both black and brown

    I have a 416 remington I want to shoot both black bear and brown. Im wondering how the bears reacted after being hit. I know the gun is enough just wondering from people that have shot bears with it. Thanks

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    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackbear View Post
    I have a 416 remington I want to shoot both black bear and brown. Im wondering how the bears reacted after being hit. I know the gun is enough just wondering from people that have shot bears with it. Thanks
    I cary a .416 RM in the fall when bear hunting with various hunting partners. Haven't found a bear for me when carrying that rifle yet, but used it to anchor a buddy's brown bear a few years ago. Devastating is the word that comes to mind. I made a solid hit on a fairly fast moving bear, but the terminal performance was simply devastating. FWIW, I used a 350 grain Speer Mag-Tip at a fairly sedate 2550 fps muzzle velocity and couldn't imagine needing more terminal effect........

    I can't say how it works when bears are shot poorly, but I suspect the results would be somewhat different than what I experienced.
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    Member Antleridge's Avatar
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    I have carried the Rem on a number of black and brown bear hunting trips and like 1Cor, I have not used it on a first shot. I have backed up shots on one Xlarge black and one medium brown - both quick followups after first shots. In both instances I was able to hit shoulder and it was lights out on the bears. I shoot a Northfork 370gr.

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    No bear experience with my 416 Taylor yet, but I lunged a caribou last fall and he collapsed trying to take one step. It was definitely the most instant stop of a caribou I've ever seen. That was with Speer 350 grain soft points going about 2350 fps. It was devastating, but no meat loss. That Remington will be good bear medicine for sure.


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    Member Matt's Avatar
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    How's the recoil of the 416 Rem. compare to, say, a 375 H&H or a 300 ultra mag?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt View Post
    How's the recoil of the 416 Rem. compare to, say, a 375 H&H or a 300 ultra mag?
    I can't say that I've shot a 300 RUM, at least I can't recall having done so. As for the .375 H&H I'd say that the difference is noticeable, but not significant if the guns are similar, i.e. same stock design, same weight and such. My rifle weighs about 8 3/4 pounds scoped and loaded, though I intend to shave off about a pound of that this spring. I'm hoping that will make it a bit more fun to shoot and carry.........
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

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    Would you recommend the shoulder shot then instead of the lung shot. Im thinking brown over baits this spring

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    Quote Originally Posted by blackbear View Post
    Would you recommend the shoulder shot then instead of the lung shot. Im thinking brown over baits this spring
    Unless you enjoy the thought of "tracking" a brownie thru thick cover, I'd shoot for the shoulder.
    Please note in all the above descriptions of shots on game, the results (dead animal) would have been the same as if the shooter had been using an '06. Shot placement is ALWAYS the key to a quick kill.

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    Love mine and have taken several browns and a few blacks. Shooting 300 gr Barns TS.

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    If the .416 doesnt do it then nothing will.

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    Put a lot of holes in a lot of different bears of different varieties with my .416 shooting 350 triple shocks. I would shoot any bear at any angle and consider it a good shot opportunity. Enough gun is one that will penetrate from any angle or bone mass and still reach the vitals. The 416 will do that. I've seen it knock the wind outa some bears with a gut shut as well. Not intentional.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt View Post
    How's the recoil of the 416 Rem. compare to, say, a 375 H&H or a 300 ultra mag?
    substantial increase without a break or porting...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary View Post
    Unless you enjoy the thought of "tracking" a brownie thru thick cover, I'd shoot for the shoulder.
    Please note in all the above descriptions of shots on game, the results (dead animal) would have been the same as if the shooter had been using an '06. Shot placement is ALWAYS the key to a quick kill.
    I agree about shot placement, but I made the exact same shot on a caribou last year with my 308 Winchester and it didn't go far, but was able to sprint like caribou do for a little ways (maybe 30-40 yards) and took 2 more to stop and tip over. Shot placement is the most fundamental thing for ethical, clean, quick kills, but I'm becoming more and more an advocate of shooting the largest bullet at your quarry that you can handle. This year was the first caribou I've ever shot and it not be able to run. I'm hoping to see how the 416 does on black bears, if boiler room shots will have enough stopping power to knock them down where they stand.
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

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    a few pennies from my corner:

    after some experience with bears (brown bear mostly...i dont consider black bear hard to kill at all) its important to remember that there is a marked difference in the effects or "shock" of any caliber when the bear is alert or alarmed as opposed to calm and unaware...a very noticeable difference, even when shots are placed in the vitals. as Gary mentioned in his post the effects of a well placed shot from a big bore gives the same outcome as one from an ought six...a dead animal. very true...but theres other variables to think about when shooting a bear that arent necessary with other animals due to their inherant toughness, especially when deciding to shoot a bear that is alert and knows something is amiss... variables such as: how close is the animal to brush that will cover him and his movements should he escape, how close the bear is to the shooter, how quickly the shooter can effectively get off additional shots after the first one, and the availablitlty of a backup shooter (if present)

    in my experience (somewhere between 40 and 50 brownies) the noticeable effect of bullet shock is more, and the time it takes for the bear to quit moving after the first shot is NOTICEABLY less when using calibers of 375 and up. this is important to realize, and the use of a big gun thus gives a hunter the chance to capitalize on more opportunities ETHICALLY. bears arent caribou, they arent sheep, they arent moose...theyre bears. they react to getting shot differently...

    the time between the first shot and the actual death of the bear (no breath, no movement) is the key here. the reason for its importance is what they are capable of in that time. many a "dead" bear has gotten to brush and been lost, gotten to brush and later charged on the recovery, or charged immediately at the firt shot (not good if your close and your carrying that favorite ought six). all these outcomes SUCK.

    keep your 416, learn to use it well, get close, and go hunting. you've got a caliber that is perfectly suited to shooting and STOPPING any bear on this earth...

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    Member akgun&ammo's Avatar
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    no bears yet with my 416 Rem, (though I have harvested both species) however I have backed up a hunter on bull moose

    his shot too far back and high

    Mine dropped the moose utilizing the only target i had through the left hindquarter and going forward

    the 400 gr bullet passed through length of moose and exited.

    bull was DOA, right there done period

    if it can do that much penitration on a moose... it has enough for any bear

    Plus, if you use the right bullet and load combo- it is very capable of long shots if necessary

    good luck,
    and post photos of yer bears this coming spring,
    Chris

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    Don't break or port a 416. If have to do that never hunt with anyone or get a smaller gun.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    Don't break or port a 416. If have to do that never hunt with anyone or get a smaller gun.
    I have a break on my .375. I sight in with it and it screws off for hunting so it doesn't blow out your or your partners ear drums. Ive never felt the recoil when shooting at game.

    My .02.

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    Hughiam: Does putting the break on and off change your POI?

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    That's a great way to go Hugh. I just wore a life jacket when sighting in my 416's. Went thru 40 rounds in one sitting once. Till things started getting blurry.....
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    That's a great way to go Hugh. I just wore a life jacket when sighting in my 416's. Went thru 40 rounds in one sitting once. Till things started getting blurry.....
    That's called a concussion Jake!
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