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Thread: Check out my vintage snowshoes

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    Member EMoss#83's Avatar
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    Default Check out my vintage snowshoes

    just varnished and conditioned the leather and noticed the 1943 stamped on them made by C.A. Lund Co. these are going for about 200$ to 250$ on the internet. does anybody know if these are the original "H" style bindings? I was going to walk about in these, maybe i should reconsider.
    "f/64 and be there"

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    Member EMoss#83's Avatar
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    "f/64 and be there"

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    Member EMoss#83's Avatar
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    "f/64 and be there"

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Very nice. I have a similar pair.

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    I bought some old wooden snowshoes (which I still strongly prefer to the aluminum ones - they're heavier but they have much better floatation) I bought on eBay and the first (and only) thing I did was to replace the bindings. The ones on yours look 1960s to me but I could be wrong. I figure they're probably fine for wall decorations but for real use I'd replace them with something new.

    Those look really nice.
    Mushing Tech: squeezing the romance out of dog mushing one post at a time

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    Member Tearbear's Avatar
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    I have an old pair of wooden Lund snowshoes that have been hanging around for years, not for usage, just for lookin' at...after seeing this thread, I took a closer look at them. One shoe reads 1942 and the other says 1943 ...the tip on the 1942 is little more upturned and bit more pointed. The hole where the toe of your boot goes, well those are different sizes as well. So I have a mismatched pair of shoes, kinda makes me wonder if someone out there has my snowshoe and I have theirs.

    Those snowshoes you have there look real nice. IMO I would reconsider using them...unless of course you get snowed in!
    "Grin and Bear It"

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    I have used mine some, but I like the bear paw model, I also own (also wood and rawhide), better than the trail shoes.
    You can buy replacement rawhide (babiche) at Black Elk Leather if you need to re-string any of the webbing (weave it in). I would not hesitate to use theses shoes in powder; just make sure you dry them out after your outings and keep ahead of the maintenance. You can do this with linseed oil thinned down with turpentine or mineral spirits. Theses shoes are tough and made to be used.

  8. #8

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    I also have a mismatched pair of the similar Lunds. I hear they were used by the military and then stored for decades in surplus warehouses so when they came up for sale they just went...no regard for serial #s or matching pairs of rights and lefts. Your serial #s likely don't match. I say go out in the powder and have fun with them and rebuild if you wear them out. The long, slow upswept tips excels in powder and won't nose dive. I was told they are vintage but not high value collectables because of the mismatch.

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    I find it interesting that a lot of folks still consider using these. Fer chrissakes, hang them on a wall. Saying they are as good or better than modern offerings is just crazy talk. Would be like saying that a 1945 Chevy is as good as a 2013 Chevy and will do all the same stuff. Yeh. Good friggin luck with that.

    The reason nobody who is in the snowshoe manufacturing game makes this style anymore is because its inferior to modern designs. Now I know Sayak just probably had a minor stroke from reading that, but he'll pull through. Think about it though. If there was any merit at all to using gut strings and wood frames at least one of the big manufacturers would have a model or two. They don't. About the only way to get a new pair of old style shoes is to make them yourself or find someone giving a clinic in basket weaving and snowshoe making. (Often the two go hand in hand.) The suggestion that gut strings and wood frames can possibly in any way provide better floatation than modern decking and tube frames is laughable at best, and obtuse at worst. When it comes to bindings and traction. the old style is about dead useless compared to the new style.

    Wanting to keep a pair around for nostalgic purposes is fine. Take them out once in awhile for laughs. Having them as your only pair and relying on them all of the time is a mistake.

    I snowshoe hundreds and hundreds of miles each winter. My old tennis rackets have been on the wall since 1989. Each one weighs 1 1/2 times what the pair of new style ones weigh. The fatigue caused by the weight difference alone can be a liability if you are not an avid snowshoer. If you don't think that an extra pound on each foot means anything, think again.

    Keep the old shoes for sure. They look cool on the wall or over the fireplace. If you want to get more into snowshoeing and plan to travel any considerable distance on them get yourself a pair of Tubbs Flex Alps or Atlas 10 or 11 series. If you just want to screw around in the yard, what you have is fine, you aren't going anywhere anyways.

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    After a winter's use, soak the rawhide (or babiche), place before a warm oven to dry, and then spar varnish them. They'll last more than 100-years . . . Mine are still "like new" since 1951, and had very heavy use for many (34) Alaska winters. I replaced the bindings twice, and used a "squaw hitch", making them easyier get into and out of.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SockeyeOne View Post
    I find it interesting that a lot of folks still consider using these. Fer chrissakes, hang them on a wall. Saying they are as good or better than modern offerings is just crazy talk. Would be like saying that a 1945 Chevy is as good as a 2013 Chevy and will do all the same stuff. Yeh. Good friggin luck with that.

    The reason nobody who is in the snowshoe manufacturing game makes this style anymore is because its inferior to modern designs. Now I know Sayak just probably had a minor stroke from reading that, but he'll pull through. Think about it though. If there was any merit at all to using gut strings and wood frames at least one of the big manufacturers would have a model or two. They don't. About the only way to get a new pair of old style shoes is to make them yourself or find someone giving a clinic in basket weaving and snowshoe making. (Often the two go hand in hand.) The suggestion that gut strings and wood frames can possibly in any way provide better floatation than modern decking and tube frames is laughable at best, and obtuse at worst. When it comes to bindings and traction. the old style is about dead useless compared to the new style.

    Wanting to keep a pair around for nostalgic purposes is fine. Take them out once in awhile for laughs. Having them as your only pair and relying on them all of the time is a mistake.

    I snowshoe hundreds and hundreds of miles each winter. My old tennis rackets have been on the wall since 1989. Each one weighs 1 1/2 times what the pair of new style ones weigh. The fatigue caused by the weight difference alone can be a liability if you are not an avid snowshoer. If you don't think that an extra pound on each foot means anything, think again.

    Keep the old shoes for sure. They look cool on the wall or over the fireplace. If you want to get more into snowshoeing and plan to travel any considerable distance on them get yourself a pair of Tubbs Flex Alps or Atlas 10 or 11 series. If you just want to screw around in the yard, what you have is fine, you aren't going anywhere anyways.
    Wow! Give it a rest! He'll find out what he likes for himself. No sense in getting militant over a pair of traditional snowshoes. Besides, as they say, "This ain't the lower 48.".

    P.S. By your philosophy nobody should be using black powder rifles or bows. After all, modern firearms kill so much better.

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    Member SockeyeOne's Avatar
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    If you think that I was being militant, you don't know what that word means.

    I was just trying to shed light on what I view as a safety issue. Maybe my wording was a bit strong, but winter safety is important if you want to live to do it again.

    Passive aggressive "this isn't the lower 48" comments are less productive than those snowshoes you like. I'm pretty sure I've hiked more four and five thousand foot peaks on snowshoes than most of the Alaskan population.

    You don't have to agree with my suggestions, but maybe a few thousand more miles in snowshoes might help you see my point.

    Sent from my expensive smartphone on some software app.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Yes, your wording was strong. You attacked a guy for being proud of his wood/babiche snowshoes. Then you attacked me by name. Ridiculous.
    As for myself, Attachment 75654I have and use both aluminum and wood snowshoes. The big trail shoes are in my classroom, and I seldom use them anymore. If you want to be a hero on snowshoes, fine. But really, let people enjoy what they want.

  14. #14

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    SockeyeOne,
    A wise old Mentor once advised me that it is ONLY what you learn AFTER you know it all that MATTERS.
    Best wishes.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    E Moss-
    Here are some picts of my trail shoes:Attachment 75660Attachment 75661

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    One more:

    Attachment 75663

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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    Yes, your wording was strong. You attacked a guy for being proud of his wood/babiche snowshoes. Then you attacked me by name. Ridiculous.
    Again, there was no 'attack' on either the OP, or you. Just suggestions on how best to stay alive far from a warm building while recreating, and not relying on antique junk in the process.

    You seem very sensitive. I'll leave you to it. Evidently you have all the answers anyhow.

  18. #18
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    Attachment 75664

    This is the style I would suggest when depending on snowshoes to get you out and back safely.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 450 ktm View Post
    I also have a mismatched pair of the similar Lunds. I hear they were used by the military and then stored for decades in surplus warehouses so when they came up for sale they just went...no regard for serial #s or matching pairs of rights and lefts. Your serial #s likely don't match. I say go out in the powder and have fun with them and rebuild if you wear them out. The long, slow upswept tips excels in powder and won't nose dive. I was told they are vintage but not high value collectables because of the mismatch.
    The ones I have were used by the same relative of mine who I inherited the old 03 A3 Springfield rifle from, and were used when he was in the service long ago. The serial numbers definitely don't match, as one shoe is a 1942 and one is a 1943...the shoes out there that do have matching serial numbers were likely issued to a higher ranking officer, and weren't thrown in the storage area to get mixed up, and yes they are worth more if the numbers match.

    I have some newer modern models that I can use, and this pair of 70 year old ones are retired. Not because I think they are worth much in monetary value, and not that I don't think they 'could' be used, as they certainly could...I just personally don't want to use them.
    "Grin and Bear It"

  20. #20
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Interesting link:

    The Athabaskan people were able to run down caribou, and pursue moose for days on such snowshoes. Amazingly efficient and ingenious use of materials and technology.

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