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Thread: Quick Access Pistol Safe Recommendations

  1. #1

    Default Quick Access Pistol Safe Recommendations

    I'm looking to get a bedside pistol safe which will keep little hands away from my firearm yet allow quick access in case of distress. I've read a few online reviews on the biometric safes and saw that they can be a bit hit or miss on whether they want to open or not. Sentry Safe had quick access pistol safe which appeared fairly reliable and easy to use...anybody own one of these? Thanks

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    I can't recommend a specific safe, but there is at least something everyone who is in the market should know. I don't know if you've ever heard of Defcon, but it's a hacker, cracker, and generally all things subversive annual convention. A few years ago, one of the presenters did a demo on home gun safes and showed how easy it is to get into them. Some took mere seconds. He explains the pitfalls and exploits of several common safes. I'm not saying this to convince you not to get one. Just to be aware of the real limitations of them. It's kind of eye opening.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uRgmvwxwZUk&noredirect=1

    It's a bit long, but he walks through styles and explains where they are inadequate.

    Having said all that, if you are aware that they won't do much in an break-in and will really only keep your kids out, they are great. Don't expect a cheap nightstand safe to protect your gun from an innovative intruder.

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    I have a biometric one with a keyboard back up. The biometric reader is not very reliable. I would get one with a keyboard or a type of push button code to release the lock. I like the additional security when dealing with loaded handguns, especially with younger children around. As for theft protection, they are likely to just take the whole safe.

    Good Luck!
    John
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    Chinese proverb

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    thanks for the responses...that guy at defcon had me laughing in the first 10 seconds! also thanks for the recommendations and food for thought; think i'll probably steer clear of the biometric safes and go for something with buttons. thanks!

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Never had much faith in the biometric stuff. Would rather keep Sig in a cheap Uncle Mikes generic fit nylon holster attached to the back of the beds headboard myself. Ten bucks, out of sight, and ready to go whenever. However, I got a 14 month old son now and been giving it thought. I am more interested in hiding the gun than securing it. The whole point of a gun by the bed is to protect me and mine from Ninjas, zombies, etc. so it needs to be accessible. Check out the innovative product below. I had gave thought to mounting one of the in wall hidden boxes above a dresser to make it more out of reach to 'little hands'. You can put a picture of your choosing in the frame. Magnet holds the gun in place. Concealed, yet ready in a split second. I almost ordered their ar15 kit, not seen on site, the other week. But on opposite side of wall I intended to use was a 3 way light switch. Leaning towards the double pistol box or a slightly larger custom box at this point. Nice folks and a very innovative product from what I can see.


    http://www.readygunbox.com



    Dan

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    We had a cheap safe for the Wife's bedroom gun. Kids we were trying to help broke in, tore out the safe, and took it with them to break into latter. The Police got her gun back a couple of months latter.

    We replaced that cheap safe with an R&D?? Thick steel construction with a recessed door and push button combo lock. Did they go under? It's a great safe.

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    What do you protect guns from? Thieves of course, never from your family no matter how young children are. They see guns from when born to old enough to wonder, then you teach safety and shooting. The gun is just a common thing like the table or chair. You fail if you need to hide guns from your kids.
    Parents need to know their kids and many today do not. Some kids are crazy and as sad as it is, some kids can not be controlled but you fail if you do not see it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bfrshooter View Post
    What do you protect guns from? Thieves of course, never from your family no matter how young children are. They see guns from when born to old enough to wonder, then you teach safety and shooting. The gun is just a common thing like the table or chair. You fail if you need to hide guns from your kids.
    Parents need to know their kids and many today do not. Some kids are crazy and as sad as it is, some kids can not be controlled but you fail if you do not see it.
    Your family ever have any visitors ?? Are you always there to 'see it' ?
    There are quite a number of unpredictable ways to 'fail'.
    "Punish the monkey - let the organ grinder go" - Mark Knopfler

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bfrshooter View Post
    What do you protect guns from? Thieves of course, never from your family no matter how young children are. They see guns from when born to old enough to wonder, then you teach safety and shooting. The gun is just a common thing like the table or chair. You fail if you need to hide guns from your kids.
    Parents need to know their kids and many today do not. Some kids are crazy and as sad as it is, some kids can not be controlled but you fail if you do not see it.
    I couldn't disagree more. My parents taught me to shoot. They taught me gun safety. We hunted together. Still, I was a kid...

    They thought their guns were hidden, but I knew where every last one of them was. At least a couple times when I was picked on, I went and grabbed one. I never did anything with it, never actually brandished it towards anyone, but...I was a kid. I could have, and darn nearly did. Foolish, yes - no doubt, but so was the choice to leave guns unlocked in a house with children.

    Kids, no matter how well trained, do not have the reasoning ability of adults. WAY more children die every year due to firearms accidents than should, and some of those accidents occur in households that train their kids and that know their kids.

    I will never have my firearms accessible to my children unless they are under my immediate and direct supervision. Period.

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Well said, Brian.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    They thought their guns were hidden, but I knew where every last one of them was.
    You make his point for him, you knew where they were and they were forbidden fruit to you. If you think there is any way to secure a gun from kids that have nothing but time your mistaken. The tighter you lock it down the bigger the challenge and the more devoted to the cause they will become . . . And today with the internet, forget it, their in there, count on it!
     
    With kids and guns there is NO safe way, even not having guns because they WILL encounter guns anyway . . . but the normalizing approach if used properly is every bit as effective as the lock them all up approach if not more so.
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  12. #12

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    The best safes I've ever found are made by Bianchi and Fobus ; The handgun your carrying on your person is worth 10 times the one you have at home in the safe when you are getting mugged. And if you walk in on a burglar you may come face to face with your own firearm , if it's housed in a cheap safe.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
    You make his point for him, you knew where they were and they were forbidden fruit to you. If you think there is any way to secure a gun from kids that have nothing but time your mistaken. The tighter you lock it down the bigger the challenge and the more devoted to the cause they will become . . . And today with the internet, forget it, their in there, count on it!
     
    With kids and guns there is NO safe way, even not having guns because they WILL encounter guns anyway . . . but the normalizing approach if used properly is every bit as effective as the lock them all up approach if not more so.
    Fair point, sir. That said, I was thinking about what I wrote last night, and I need to edit it. The guns weren't all hidden - some were, but some were simply stored in a closet under the stairs such as the hunting shotguns and rifles. They weren't forbidden fruit, though I see how it came across that way in my post. Some were, perhaps - but the firearms we used for hunting were readily accessible and there was no attempt made to keep them away. I was thinking of a couple of handguns when I was picturing how the firearms were stored in our household growing up, but in retrospect those weren't the ones I grabbed a couple of times when I was dealing with my childhood angst.

    Regardless, I will always keep my firearms in a locked safe. They won't be mysteries to my kids, nor will they be forbidden fruit - we will shoot regularly and they will be educated as to their safe and proper use. But they most certainly will be locked and my kids will not have access to the safe combination.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
    You make his point for him, you knew where they were and they were forbidden fruit to you. If you think there is any way to secure a gun from kids that have nothing but time your mistaken. The tighter you lock it down the bigger the challenge and the more devoted to the cause they will become . . . And today with the internet, forget it, their in there, count on it!
     
    With kids and guns there is NO safe way, even not having guns because they WILL encounter guns anyway . . . but the normalizing approach if used properly is every bit as effective as the lock them all up approach if not more so.
    I'm dealing much with this right now. I'm on the same plane as you in that I normalize my kids with the guns in our house. The day I buy a new gun, the first thing I do is clear it in front of the kids and hand it to them. They know the drill. The gun is safe, they can check it out and dry fire it and whatever they want during that time. It let's them get any curiosity out their systems. Pretty much the same thing with any new ammo or whatever I get.

    So I often leave my EDC gun sitting near me on the table or back of the couch or whatever, always within reach, but not locked. My kids are not fascinated with it because they don't really care anymore. However, recently my M-I-L has moved in with us and is very gun shy. She's not really "anti-gun" but definitely not comfortable with them. She grew up in a house where the guns were hidden and forbidden to be touched even in parental presence. Now she's asking me to stop leaving my gun out. She wants me to hide it from the kids and keep it up high so they can't reach it and all kinds of things. She's said she's worried about the kids, but frankly I trust the kids with them more than I trust her. So now I'm normalizing her. Against her will, but I won't change my methods because she's uncomfortable.

    PS, I should clarify, I don't leave all my guns laying around the house loaded and stuff, like we're tripping over them. I just don't always feel like having my EDC holstered while at home so I'll set it on the end table while I watch TV or whatever. She panics about that.

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    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Everyone and every home is different and we got to do the best we can with a complex problem. My point was mostly donít go picking apart someoneís well proven method and advocating a PC method that very well may not work at all for them. Life is full of tools and a wise person tries to use the best tools for the job, the best system would look different for everyone so donít cast stones.
     
     
    Mobius I went through the same MIL issue, I did the same thing but it was an ongoing deal till she died. Merging family cultures is hard and the longer you live the more outside cultures get drug in to further complicate things.
    Andy
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