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Thread: Grouse Hunting

  1. #1
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    Default Grouse Hunting

    I am hoping to do some grouse hunting sometime this winter, in or near the valley, and was wondering where I would be most likely to find the grouse, on the mountains around here, or on lower ground? I bumped into one earlier while hunting on the flats, but only one. Any tips on what type of terrain grouse hang out on would be appreciated!

  2. #2
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    I'm not an expert by any means but I doubt you'll find many now. I've gone out most every weekend and haven't seen any since the snow built up. Lots of bunny tracks but no birds.

  3. #3
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    They're out there, but theres not alot of them and its a shame to shoot grouse this time of year because they are almost inedible, IMO.

  4. #4
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    I have seen a half dozen last 2 trips out.Do not even bother shooting them.

  5. #5
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    Oh ok, didn't know that. I have normally hunted them August-October.

  6. #6
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    They start eating spruce tips once the weather gets cold. Makes them taste like turpentine.....

  7. #7
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I would go to one of the ruffed grouse areas and hunt them. They eat aspen buds and should taste ok. Lower bag limits and harder to find but more fun to hunt. Ptarmigan is another option if you are interested in getting up above tree line.

  8. #8
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    Actually you can eat them this time of the year if you prepare them the right way. We generally soak them in whiskey for about 3 hours which removes the bitter taste and then use a dry rub on them. If you are looking for a cheap and easy dry rub, Lipton onion soup mix works great. Cook them medium rare.

  9. #9
    Member honeybadger's Avatar
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    Cube the meat and soak them in a gallon of water with a tablespoon of salt and a tablespoon of baking soda and a teaspoon of vinegar. Then marinade them for another day in whatever marinade you like. I prefer korean barbeque.

    Remember to cut the thighs off and use as much of the bird as possible, can't stand it when hunters breast birds out. Not that its not their right to do so, just bothers me.

  10. #10
    Member honeybadger's Avatar
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    I like to use the carcass to make soup stock. You can use the leftover bits of meat to make a hash too.

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