Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Life span of stocked Rainbow?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    40

    Default Life span of stocked Rainbow?

    I've been digging around and can not find the life span for stocked ranbow. I know that food, pressure, and water conditions all play a part in a fishies life. Is it safe to say that planter will live ten years? Im not looking for a spot to fish, curious to hear what the biggest plant fish you have seen or heard of. Please dont include the location, I am just looking for info on how big they can get. Thanks and Happy Thanksgiving!!

  2. #2

    Default

    In general, I think a stocked rainbow typically reaches maturity after 3-5 years. I think the maximum is right around 10-12 years. There probably is a lot of variance between different bodies of water and different strains of stocked fish. Rainbows will not spawn unless there is flowing water somewhere in the lake. They reach sexual maturity at 3-5 years. Some of the fish stocked have a normal genetic makeup (diploid). Others stocked are sterile (triploid). I have heard the triploid variety can get bigger, because most of the food they consume goes into growth rather than formation of gametes (sex cells). Not sure if that is true or not, but makes sense. If you look at the fish and game website, there is a listing of all the lakes that they stock and it tells you which lakes are stocked with diploid and triploid trout. A lake that is more productive and has more nutrients will also have a more abundant food supply which also can play a factor in growth. Another factor that increases growth is water temperature, but my assumption would be that water temperature would be a constant variable that doesn't vary much between different bodies of water. And if there was small differences in temperature, the trout would select locations where they lived in the lake due to differences in temperature, food availability, oxygen levels etc. I have heard of rainbows getting over 25-26" in lakes that are stocked, but I personally haven't seen any bigger than that. Here is some more info from the fish and game website.

    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/ed...nbow_trout.pdf

  3. #3
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Central Kenai Peninsula
    Posts
    4,886

    Default

    An old friend of mine who passed away a few years ago caught one that was ~9#. This was from a lake with a natural and stocked population so I do not know which it was.
    He actually tried to enter it in the Trustworthy ice fishing derby but was a day early.
    Of course he was 80 something years old at the time. He later told me he ate the fish.
    I don't know how old they can get but I do know southcentral lakes that have natural populations do tend to have much larger fish in them on average.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  4. #4
    Member Raffpappy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    North Pole, Ak
    Posts
    241

    Default

    If memory serves, triploids will live longer, eat more, and get bigger than diploid rainbows. I saw the difference in WA state before coming up here. Put trips in a rich body of water and they'll exceed 20 pounds. Rufus Woods in NE Washington is famous for monster trips that push 30 pounds! That body of water is the reason fish and game there now has a "triploid rainbow" category, or was leaning that way, because the diploid rainbow record was being consistently shattered. As for diploids at least down there, my buddies and I figured they would hit 22-24" in 5 years but only saw a few 25-27" fish that we figured lasted an additional year.


  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    72

    Default

    When I lived in the Spokane area many years ago there were a few lakes that were catch and release trophy fish waters. A sport fishing group worked with the Fish & Game in some of these lakes to catch and sterilize rainbows. Fish that don't go through the stress of spawning tend to live longer.
    Here in Alaska the state has a policy of not planting "viable" (fish capable of reproducing) fish in waters where they could become established and compete with native populations. A notable exception would be salmon.
    Triploid fish do not reproduce so they would tend to live longer than natural fish. As others have pointed out the environment and fishing pressure plays a big role in stocked fish longevity.
    It's interesting that here in Anchorage F&G many years ago planted viable rainbows in Chester Creek. They now plant triploid rainbows in that drainage but the original plants established a reproducing population of rainbows. If fishing in University Lake you can catch "natural" and stocked rainbows and usually it's fairly easy to tell the difference.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wasilla, AK
    Posts
    263

    Default

    A 10 year old hatchery rainbow is an old one. Not sure what they top out at for age but a few online sources say 11 years. Growing up we had a small private lake on our property (Western WA) that my father had stocked with hatchery rainbows when I was little. It was a very healthy lake and after several years it was not uncommon for us to pull out 25"+ fish out and some in the 30" range. So they can get big given the right circumstances. The triploids that Nylrem mentioned get absolutely huge. Down here in Rufus Woods Reservoir they get them over 20 pounds. That's just bizarre...

    Scott

  7. #7
    Member JediMasterSalmonSlayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    North Pole, Alaska
    Posts
    1,837

    Default

    Triploid - yeah they get big

    48 lb world record

    http://www.myfishingpictures.com/watermark.php?file=133776
    Jedi Salmon Powers Activated!
    www.alaskansalmonslayers.com


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •