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Thread: Where to Buy Traditional shoe bindings?

  1. #1
    Member EMoss#83's Avatar
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    Default Where to Buy Traditional shoe bindings?

    I Have some old traditional snowshoes, but i would like to put on some strong,modern bindings. does anybody now where i can buy them in alaska and not have to order from the inter web?
    "f/64 and be there"

  2. #2
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Can't help with a local recommendation, but if you opt to shop online, this is the place: http://www.snowshoesalesandrepairs.c...ion=main_index
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
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  3. #3
    Member SockeyeOne's Avatar
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    Save your money. Hang the old tennis rackets over the mantle. Unless you are involved with some type of historical activities, the old skewl snowshoes are more of a liability than they are an asset at this point in time. I last used mine in 1989, and now they are wall decoration.

    To answer your question more directly, you can, of course, put a modern binding on a wood frame snowshoe. BUT..... When you consider the cost of the bindings and the time it would take to correctly mount them (read: trial and error.), it would likely be better to save up a little more dough and just purchase a complete set of the 'new technology' snowshoes. You will also want to consider that you may have to alter the frame to accomodate a mounting location for the bindings, and may also have to redesign the stringing so that the hinged design of modern bindings doesn't interfere with the webbing of your old shoes, otherwise the cleats and 'crampons' featured in the modern binding types will destroy your strings.

    I made the switch in 1990 to a set of Tubbs. The first thing I noticed about them was how light they were and how I could hike much longer distances with much less fatigue. The second big improvement I noticed was the traction. The new style allowed me to get a lot more 'gription' on slippery surfaces like icy inclines or windswept frozen lakes and ponds. I wore that set out on about 5 years, and during that time a friend turned me on to the Atlas brand of snowshoes. Since then I have never bought any other brand, and am on my third set. (I snowshoe A LOT. Hundreds upon hundreds of miles every winter. An average day for me is 20-25 miles, and I am known to go out 3 or 4 times a week.)

    I would highly reccommend the Atlas 9 or 10 series for casual snowshoe enthusiasts. (8 or 10 miles on relatively flat or rolling terrain.) For those doing a bit more climbing or going longer distances the 11 series is the ticket. If you are like me and climb 20 or 30 mountains in a winter with long days that start well before sun-up and end well after sun-down look no further than the Atlas 12 series. The 12 series has been able to handle everything I have thrown at them so far including 20 mile days with 5000 feet of elevation change. The bindings are super easy to use even in the coldest of weather, and unlike a lot of my buddies who run MSR brand, mine have never had an on trail failure or needed to be sent back to the maker for repairs. The MSR's seem to be in the mail more than on the trail in my experience, so no matter how tasty it looks, please don't drink the MSR kool-aid.

    Good luck with your quest for better snowshoes. Feel free to PM or email me if you want further discussion on the topic.

  4. #4
    Member SockeyeOne's Avatar
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    Link to Atlas website.

    http://atlassnowshoe.com/

    One more thing. If you decide to get new style shoes to replace your old ones, 25 or 30 inch shoes are all thats needed unless you are 300 pounds and hike in deep powder. The average 180-200 pound fella who goes out on weekends with a day pack on packed out trails can get away with 25's every time. 30's if you pack out your own trail a lot or live remotely and need to get around the property after storms. 36's are overkill unless you are, like I said, a real big fella who likes to hike in deep powder.

  5. #5
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    I like my old Maine snow shoes of hickory and babiche. They are very quiet and light.
    You can easily make bindings from either webbing or inner tubes. Youtube shows how. Or this:http://www.trapperman.com/forum/ubbt...pics/3514170/1

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