Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Wow'zer look at this black & white photo

  1. #1

    Default Wow'zer look at this black & white photo

    There is something about a tight curl ending in a wide flair that excites me.

    http://www.winchesterguns.com/produc...alog/index.asp

  2. #2
    Member Kotton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Anchorage ak
    Posts
    652

    Default

    That is a stud of a ram! Should excite anyone that dreams of a white sheep,wow what a ram!!

  3. #3
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,008

    Default

    That's Jack O'Connor. He was a serious sheep hunter.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

  4. #4
    Member summitx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Los Anchorage
    Posts
    400

    Default

    nice ram, has kinda of a skinny neck

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Kenai
    Posts
    1,888

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Erik in AK View Post
    That's Jack O'Connor. He was a serious sheep hunter.
    Beautiful Ram! Suppose he was killed with a Mod 70 in 270 Win?
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  6. #6
    Member L. G.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    N'ern S.E. AK
    Posts
    838

    Default

    That animal must have had a hard time seeing the ground in front of him when walking. Those horns are insane!

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    154

    Default

    Cruhuhuhusher....
    Alpine is awesome...

  8. #8
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by L. G. View Post
    That animal must have had a hard time seeing the ground in front of him when walking. Those horns are insane!
    You must be right, he sure didn't see ole Jack seeking up on him.

    Steve
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    739

    Default

    Guys, that is Jacks best Dall taken in 1950 on Pilot Mt. in the Yukon. He said it was a very even argali-style with the longer side going 43 5/8" after the drying period. It was ranked #12 in 1952 but since has come down the list. Of course it was with a pre'64 Model 70 in .270Win. with a re-stocked job by Al Linden.
    If you ever get a chance to buy "Sheep and Sheep Hunting" by JOC, 1st printing 1974, buy it. I guarantee you will have nightmares and dog ear the pages.
    You will find a new appreciation to what the "old boys" did back then before stainless/kevlar rifles, Goretex, Kifaru, Kuiu, and all the high tech stuff we now have.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by summitx View Post
    nice ram, has kinda of a skinny neck
    no time to grow neck - too busy growing horns!

  11. #11
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, Alaska
    Posts
    2,032

    Default

    Honest question....How were optics way back then? Nowadays a keen eye can locate animals from very far away. Just curious....

  12. #12
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,750

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bighorse View Post
    Honest question....How were optics way back then? Nowadays a keen eye can locate animals from very far away. Just curious....
    Hard to say how many Americans used them, but there was good glass available back then:

    The Founding of SWAROVSKI OPTIK
    In 1935, Wilhelm Swarovski, son of the original founder, was a mere 47 years of age. Already an avid hobby astronomer, Wilhelm’s passion “to be closer to the stars", as he himself described it, awakened his ambition to build his own, improved binocular. With access to the specialized glass production and finishing technologies already used to manufacture jewelry stones in his father’s factory, Wilhelm managed to develop a novel prism fabrication and grinding process that he applied in constructing his first 6x30 binocular. Wilhelm went on to found SWAROVSKI OPTIK KG in Absam, Tyrol, in 1949 thus laying the foundation stone for a sport optics company with a global reputation. His company’s first serial product, the Habicht 7x42, is still an industry standard in the field of hunting optics and continues as ever to be produced by SWAROVSKI OPTIK in the best tradition of its founder.

    Progress and Innovation From a Historical Point of View
    Progress through precision and technology is a philosophy ingrained in the Swarovski family’s genetic code, and their companies have remained true to this day to this shared principle and the values of the founders. After the legendary Habicht, SWAROVSKI OPTIK introduced its first rifle scope in 1959, its initial extendable spotting scope in 1967 and, in 1971, the world’s first rubber-armored binocular. In 1976, another worldwide premiere saw the launch of a rifle scope equipped with a proprietary shock absorber for preventing recoil injuries to the eye. In 1994 SWAROVSKI OPTIK introduced the first telescope. And, in 1999, the SWAROVSKI OPTIK EL binocular with the world’s first wrap-around grip captured Field and Stream Magazine’s Best of the Best Award, making it the development of the decade. Since 2007, the Z6 rifle scope range with the first 6x zoom has received international acclaim among the world’s hunting fraternity. In all, over 30 national and international awards pay tribute to the company’s innovative strength, the superior precision and uncompromising quality and also to the elegance and the innovative design that go into the SWAROVSKI OPTIK brand.

    Also, my father bought me a Swift rifle scope (which I still have today) that has decent glass. Swift has been around since the 1920's....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  13. #13
    Member ramhunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    699

    Default

    I hate to pop your Jack O' Connor bubble guys , but that ram was killed by Herb Klein in 1950 on Prospector mtn in the yukon's Sifton range! The ram is 47" on the long side and scores 174 6/8 B&C. Jack O'Connor accompanied Herb on that hunting trip, thus the picture go Jack holding the ram's head and horns! this was the ram that got Herb hooked on trophy sheep hunting!
    "Mountains are not fair or unfair, they are just dangerous" ~ Reinhold Messner

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •