Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Seeking info on antique meat grinder

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,587

    Default Seeking info on antique meat grinder

    Hey you guys, I recently received a small, No. 10 antique meat grinder for my birthday, and I'm trying to find out anything about it. I can find next to nothing about it on the internet, and that is rare for me.

    It is a small, cast iron(or appears to be; it has a smooth finish on it, though) meat grinder. The opening is only about 4" across and the output is about 2" across. It has a small corKscrew inside. It is manual, hand turn and it clamps onto a counter or table.

    Markings cast into the grinder are "KEYSTONE" "10" and "C.I. Co. BOYERTOWN PA" (and there is a "MADE IN USA" as well, but that seems redundant to me.)

    I only found onewebsite with any info on this http://www.castironcollector.com/keystone.php although, they are everywhere on every auction site on the web. (And they are worth next to nothing; seems like the average price is in the $10.00 range.) It would seem, to me, that something that has that many units out there, would have some more history on the web about it.

    What I'd like to find out most is any history on the company etc. It cmes apart pretty easy, has only about 4 pieces, so cleaning the rust off of it should be no issue. However, as rust preventative, should I cot the thing in olive oile or lard or somethig after each use? (obviously, this is my first piece of meat butchering stuff.)

    This was my girlfriend's dad's from God knows when, and I'd like to put it to use pretty soon. (He requested steak burgers-ground up steak-go figure.) It's not something I'd want to do a moose with, but maybe a deer or something.

    This website has a bunch of images of similar units. http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=keystone+10+meat+grinder&id=DEC6BE6D85652 145972185424770AD9A03F0D725&FORM=IQFRBA


  2. #2
    Member pacific-23's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Sitka, Ak
    Posts
    306

    Default

    Can't give you any details on the history of the unit but we had a similar one growing up (no power). I spent many hours as a kid cranking that thing processing deer meat. After use it was thoroughly dried and oiled with olive oil, never seemed to have a rust problem.

  3. #3
    Member SockeyeOne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Adirondack Mountains
    Posts
    172

    Default

    These were made in different sizes for different uses. The '10' is the small one for light home use. The '40' is the one that borders on being reasonable for commercial use.

    Griswold was the major competitor for Keystone in the manual meat grinder market when they were popular, and frankly, the Griswold is a much better unit. (No insult to your Keystone model.)

    The '10' will suit you just fine for home use so long as you aren't trying to use it to fill the freezer. If you were, you'd probably want to hire an elf to crank it around the clock for you. The larger sizes do much better at producing volume. Like if you were filling the freezer for the family every year.

    This model is still made, but by a different company using the original patent. Buffalo Foods is the company still making this unit I believe.

    Use it, have fun with it, make some tasty sausages and process some venison or whatever you like. Duck breasts and other fowl are perfect for this type of unit. I make chicken patties from white meat chicken with no filler or preservatives. When my son was young he and his buddies always wanted them.

    Keep the dies clean and rust free. I like to use veg shortning cause you can smear on a light coating with a cloth or paper towel and it sticks. If you choose to go the shortning route, remember to not let it build up, meaning, wipe off the excess.

    These days I am using an electric model. I'm not giving up my manual ones though. They work too good, and electric gizmos have a bad habit of failing just when you need them the most.

  4. #4
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    5,639

    Smile

    Lots of grinders, new and old, like that being used today. My guess is that if it's a #10, grinding plates and sausage tubes are likely still available as the #10 size is pretty standard.


    Check your local Sportsman's Warehouse . . you'll need coarse and fine grinding plates, stuffing tubes if you're making sausage.


    Here you go:

    http://www.google.com/#q=%2310+meat+grinder

    http://www.google.com/#q=%2310+meat+grinder+plates

    http://www.google.com/#q=%2310+meat+...+sausage+tubes


    Happy Thanksgiving . .

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,587

    Default

    Thanks ever so much for your comments, guys. I hadn't even thought about getting stuff tubes, yet, and I figured there would be no way to buy other parts for it, so that's awesome.

    Yeah I knew it wasn't a "top of the line" brand/model when I saw the under $20 price points for similar models.

    As far as hiring an elf to crank it, that would be my 12 year old son. LOL

    Happy Thanksgiving.

  6. #6
    Member SockeyeOne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Adirondack Mountains
    Posts
    172

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FL2AK-Old Town View Post
    As far as hiring an elf to crank it, that would be my 12 year old son. LOL
    Obviously you already got the memo on the interchangability between elves and tweens.

    Mine is going to be 20. I am waiting on grand-elves at this point. (Not too soon please Alex.)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •