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Thread: Red Dragon parts source?

  1. #1
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    Default Red Dragon parts source?

    Does anyone know a source for Red Dragon preheater parts? I think my safety valve (the valve with the button you press while starting) may be defective. It would be nice to find someone locally here in Fairbanks with parts in stock, but if not I could order one. I have an older heater I bought in 1988, I think the valve may have changed since then. Thanks...Louis
    Louis Knapp

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    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    AIH maybe....
    That gas start-up valve is similar to those used in other gas heaters. Maybe a Gas furnace place would have one...
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

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    Totem equipment in anchorage.
    Do I give my friends advice? Jesus, no. They wouldn't take advice from me. Nobody should take advice from me. I haven't got a clue about anything..

  5. #5

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    I'd think that one of the boiler (HVAC) parts stores should have a thermocouple.

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    yep, I would check the thermocouple before I replaced the valve. I had one that liked to fall out of the holder and of course, then as soon as you let up on the plunger it would shut off.

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    Thanks, folks. I'll try the thermocouple. Any idea what temperature that cuts off at? I've tried several several heating outfits here in Fairbanks without much luck but there's a number of them I haven't checked out yet. ...Louis
    Louis Knapp

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    Try Suburban Propane to get the correct part for that archaic POS heater.

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    Member avidflyer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    Try Suburban Propane to get the correct part for that archaic POS heater.
    lotsa guys have been using the "archaic POS" for a lot of years. I still use mine as does most people I know who dont have a nice warm hangar to keep the plane in or a plug in close. What makes them such a POS if they have successfully been preheating lotsa planes for lotsa years?

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    A moisture belching flamethrower isn't my choice of heaters for my airplanes. I've had a Red Dragon for 20 years. I haven't taken it out of the shed for at least 15 of those. There are much better tools for the job. Like a Reiff system on the engine and a 1000w generator to power it. Start the generator and leave for a couple of hours. I've never seen a Red Dragon used for long enough to heat the oil. Sure, a few minutes will heat the cylinders enough to fire the engine, but that doesn't make it a good preheater. The thing that really soured me on the Dragon was when it caught my 180 on fire. That qualifies it as a POS in my book.

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    the Red Dragon runs good and won't catch anything on fire, but you have to be smarter than the machine. Install the gas shut off-if-the-fan-quits solenoid. Everyone needs to do that if they are using it on an airplane....

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    Maybe someday I'll be smart enough to use a Red Dragon. Until them I'll just accept that when using a flame to preheat a plane there's always a risk of that flame spreading. So I avoid using flame devices when I can. Which in my opinion makes me smarter than the machine. :-)

    The best advantage of electric preheat is that you can leave the plane unattended while using it. The end.

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    Some people aren't as smart as they believe. They make these thingies called ducting or heater hose. You keep the flame away from the aircraft, the heated air flows through the ducting. Get it? The flame source is twelve feet away from the aircraft. Now if you aren't smart enough to fix your fuel leaks or whatever you caught on fire....maybe you should find a new hobby... The problem with generators is they won't run when they are cold. How do you preheat your generator? When out in the Brooks Range (or wherever), you have to bring the generator in the tent and fire up the lantern and cook stove. One other problem is you may have to use 100LL in your generator. My first Honda 1000 died from 100LL lead poisoning. I still use a Red Dragon and use a generator when the situation calls for it. Every preheat system has its shortcomings. This hunting season I had to use my MSR stove and Coleman peak lantern to preheat the plane. I carry a kit with some high temp scat hose to keep the stove flame away from the engine cowling. The lantern preheats the expensive instruments.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    A moisture belching flamethrower isn't my choice of heaters for my airplanes. I've had a Red Dragon for 20 years. I haven't taken it out of the shed for at least 15 of those. There are much better tools for the job. Like a Reiff system on the engine and a 1000w generator to power it. Start the generator and leave for a couple of hours. I've never seen a Red Dragon used for long enough to heat the oil. Sure, a few minutes will heat the cylinders enough to fire the engine, but that doesn't make it a good preheater. The thing that really soured me on the Dragon was when it caught my 180 on fire. That qualifies it as a POS in my book.
    I will gladly take that POS heater out of your shed and free up some space for you...

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