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Thread: Long Live the KING!

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    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
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    Default Long Live the KING!

    Can't wait to see the whole thing when it's released

    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
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    The KeenEye MD

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    Wink Wow . . . !




    —quotes from the video (my comments follow in parentheses):


    ". . the biggest, baddest, gnarliest fish in the water . ." (Go catch a tarpon or a marlin.)

    ". . like a common food fish . . " (As opposed to what? A fish to play with?)

    ". . just good enough to play a fish and let him go . . " (Ummm . . speak for yourself.)




    “Never say playing. You are at best torturing and at worst killing a creature you may or may not eat. Playing at one end, dying at the other -- if playing is what it is, it is sadism.”

    —John McPhee

    ****************

    —copy following the video at (emphasis added):

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    Long Live the King is a story of hope and resurgence for Alaska's great King Salmon fishery. Returning numbers of the fish have been dropping steadily, and both 2012 and 2013 hit especially hard - with multiple rivers and regions across the state seeing some of the lowest returns ever, forcing Alaska Fish and Game officials to close or severely limit salmon fishing around the state, including on some of Alaska's most iconic rivers. In addition, what is starting to seem like an all out war on salmon – mining, dams, hatcheries and the state government are all marching forward in opposition of Alaska treasure salmon resource. For many, this is an attack on religion, not just a fish.
    This film seeks to ignite an angler's passion - showing why salmon are worth fighting for from a fly fishing perspective. By showcasing some of Alaska's world class adventures - a team of Alaska's best guides and anglers explore the state's rivers, fly fishing for King Salmon, while practicing "catch and release" for the benefit of greater escapement and future salmon spawn. Through interviews and candid conversation, we will hear from long-time Alaska guides, lodge owners, Native elders, political figures, conservation leaders, and wilderness pioneers who have an abundance of untapped folk information on the state's great King Salmon lore. In these virtually untold stories, lies the spirit of Alaska - the dream of its wild lands and freedoms that can hardly be imagined in our current time.
    King Salmon are an icon for Alaska, and a treasured sport fish for the entire world. Long Live the King celebrates the great homecoming of salmon to the Last Frontier, while promoting a re-energized culture of sustainability among salmon fishermen and women worldwide. Through inspiring imagery, explosive fishing, emotional testimony and a tone of sustainability, respect, and stewardship, the film breathes new life into the hearts of anglers. One goal of this film is to boost the grassroots efforts of our conservation partners to defend the land, waters, cultural heritage, and invaluable resources of Alaska, including the mighty King Salmon of the Last Frontier.
    Music: "300 Violin Orchestra" by Jorge Quintero
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    Thumbs up Long live the noble sockeye . . .



    —from today's Peninsula Clarion



    Kings drive news, sockeyes drive inlet economy


    Posted: November 16, 2013 - 8:34pm


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    Marcus,
    your quote about tarpon is an opinion, just like the one stated in the video. Not to mention I THINK I recall you admitting to the C&R thing along with selective harvest. (Think back to a conversation about pinks/silvers)

    However I don't see how this can be construed as an "attack on religion," even if one is citing culture.

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    Question

    Quote Originally Posted by kenaibow fan View Post
    Marcus,
    your quote about tarpon is an opinion, just like the one stated in the video. Not to mention I THINK I recall you admitting to the C&R thing along with selective harvest. (Think back to a conversation about pinks/silvers)

    However I don't see how this can be construed as an "attack on religion," even if one is citing culture.



    You kinda lost me here, kenaibow fan . . my mention of tarpon was as an option for anglers who seem to think a 50# chinook is the end-all/be-all of big fish. There are lots and lots of really big fish out there . . lots bigger than chinook salmon.


    Am totally unable to understand your "you admitting to the C&R thing along with selective harvest. (Think back to a conversation about pinks/silvers)." Give me some help.


    Finally, the "attack on religion" remark did not come from me, it came from the size-matters folks. That said, I totally agree . . such an obsession truly does smack of religion.

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    Member kenaibow fan's Avatar
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    Marcus,

    I understand the religion bit didn't come from you, I was basically throwing it in there because it was highlighted. Besides what fun would it be to totally disagree with every thing you said?! LOL

    The tarpon comment was made in reference to what I thought was you expressing your preference to catching tarpon… the hole bigger, baddest suggestion. I agree there are plenty of fish that could be described as such, but to each there own as to what that fish might be.

    As for the C&R comment in regards to fishing for pinks/silvers. I mentioned I though you admitted in a post about you using selective harvest and or C&R to keep silvers, i.e weeding through pinks to get silvers and I guess we could throw in trout fishing if we need to really get picky. I know your not an advocate for C&R. But 100 percent of the fish that don't make it back into the water die, fish that do by any intent has better odds of surviving. I will admit that this brings up a whole different topic which is in my opinion still related and I think should not be over looked as one of the many causes for the decline of kings, selective harvest.

    However for the context of this conversation I can only some what agree with the comment about economics and sockeye, or your comments prior to that post pertaining to kings. And if I am wrong by all means correct me, but I get the feeling that your primary reason for fishing is harvest, which is your right and far be it for me to judge. I for one don't like to eat salmon, so I spend little time fishing for them, rather I spend my time chasing other fish. All in all I think we can both agree that there are issues with salmon stocks and I am not sure exploiting a fish people are trying to save is the best way to go about it.

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    It will be interesting to see where they go with this. I was encouraged to see that they did mention that it could be largely a natural, cyclical occurrence, as a lot of historical commercial harvest data indicates.

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    Thumbs up Big fish . . tough men . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by kenaibow fan View Post
    Marcus, your quote about tarpon is an opinion . .

    Ummmmmmmm . . not even . . this is what I'm talkin' about as a suggestion for the size-matters/C&R/rush-thrills-sense-of conquest folks . .


    . . makes chinook look like sucker minnows . . talk about a rush . . thrills . . a sense of conquest . .


    . . here's where the big boys hang out . . . no lolly-gaggin' in a big Willie waitin' for a takedown . . these guys are as tough as the fish they go after . . .



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    There is a different forum if you would like to talk about salt water. Apples to oranges argument again.
    When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
    '08 24' HCM Granite HD "River Dog"

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    Cool Bow to the king . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Music Man View Post
    There is a different forum if you would like to talk about salt water. Apples to oranges argument again.

    You'll have to run that one by the charters and the guys fishing the river in tidewater . .


    Nevertheless, the comparison I'm making is not between fresh and salt water or any such thing.


    The subject here is "thrills . . a rush . . a sense of conquest . . "


    Hey, a tarpon-thrill is a bigger thrill than a chinook-thrill . . . same for a "sense of conquest" . . .


    Bow to the king . . .


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    Well Marcus I am sure plenty of people would agree with you concerning tarpon……..but I still feel like that is an opinion. I have been salt fishing for marlin and tuna before and I can honestly tell you that for me I much rather prefer fly fishing a skinny stream for steel over any salt water/brackish water fish. And truth be told if I was really going for a thrill or "sense of conquest" I would love to go to Mongolia and fish for Taimen.

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    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by kenaibow fan View Post
    Well Marcus I am sure plenty of people would agree with you concerning tarpon……..but I still feel like that is an opinion. I have been salt fishing for marlin and tuna before and I can honestly tell you that for me I much rather prefer fly fishing a skinny stream for steel over any salt water/brackish water fish. And truth be told if I was really going for a thrill or "sense of conquest" I would love to go to Mongolia and fish for Taimen.

    Well, at least the folks in the OP's video were doing it with fly rods . .


    . . me, I'd like to return to the Big Manistee with my Orvis 6-weight and cast for selective browns . .


    . . no vulgar "sense of conquest" needed . .


    . . just the sense of being part of something much bigger than my ego . .

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    Never much messed around with Kenai kings, but just loved to catch them from Kasilof, Ninilchik, Deep Creek and Anchor River and grill them up or poach them. It was a rite and taste of spring for me. But I have foresworn kings until they rebound... maybe they never will in my life time.

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    Red face Bizarre . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    . . I have foresworn kings until they rebound... maybe they never will in my life time.

    Don't you think that's over-reacting, sayak? Rebound? Rebound from what? The kings have always made escapement . . we have their word on it. Moreover, it doesn't really matter how many we catch (exploitation rate), what really matters is where we exploit sub-stocks. Hey, just pick a non-sanctuary spot and exploit away.


    Actually, this farce—over a decade old now—is a graphic illustration of Dr. Montgomery's warning that we may not be able to save the fish even if we [say we] want to. It's the Tragedy of the Commons being played out before our very eyes.



    “Angling for large trophy gamefish has become the obsession of many sportfishermen. The thrill of hooking and landing that fish of a lifetime . . is a rush . . One is rewarded with a sense of conquest . . The sheer elation must be experienced . .

    —from Salmon-Trout-Steelheader, April/May, 2002, “Giant Kenai River Kings”

    How have we come here when such a childish obsession has put an entire stock of salmon at risk yet the effort to continue to kill them continues unabated? "Sanctuary areas," "slot limits," and all such euphemisms are smoke-screens designed to perpetuate "economic opportunity." Bonk the rats and dinks, kill and stress the slot fish with C&R, and if you get a real "trophy," you can bonk that too. How does one indulge a "sense of conquest" from abusing a creature with a brain the size of a pea?


    This whole fiasco gives new depth to Tolstoy's quip in Anna Karenina:

    ". . he wanted to go with a fishing rod to the river. Sergey Ivanovitch was fond of angling, and was, it seemed, proud of being able to care for such a stupid occupation."

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