Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 36

Thread: Anchorage Area Marinas

  1. #1
    Member SockeyeOne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Adirondack Mountains
    Posts
    172

    Default Anchorage Area Marinas

    I know there are marinas in the Southeast, but what about around Anchorage or Southcentral areas?

    Anyone know of a decent marina in the Anchorage vicinity that would be suitable for a 32 foot sportfisher?

    Thinking of bringing my boat north with me.

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,392

    Default

    Definitely not Anchorage.

    Your closest options are Whittier and Seward, with Homer and Valdez being more distant options. Whittier is an hour drive from Anchorage along with a 10 minute drive through a 2-mile long tunnel. The waters of Prince William Sound are amazing and well protected, the salmon fishing and shrimping are great, but the halibut fishing is spotty at best unless you run 50-80 miles from port. That said, getting a slip can take more than 10 years on the waiting list, so unless your boat is trailerable, Whittier may not be an option. Seward is 2.5 hours from Anchorage, waters are a bit less protected than Whittier but you're closer to good halibut fishing in addition to great salmon fishing (though no shrimping without a long run). The harbor is much nicer than Whittier and I'm pretty sure that it's easier to get a slip.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,892

    Default

    Is it on a trailer? Cause the closes place you can get a spot is Seward or homer and thats only in transit parking.... Long waiting list for slips.... If you have it on a trailer bring it other wise you be upset that you didn't.
    Do I give my friends advice? Jesus, no. They wouldn't take advice from me. Nobody should take advice from me. I haven't got a clue about anything..

  4. #4
    Member SockeyeOne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Adirondack Mountains
    Posts
    172

    Default

    Thanks for the feedback Brian.

    My boat is not what you would consider the trailerable variety unless you have a big rig and a tri-axle trailer. It goes about 7 1/2 tons and stands 11 feet off the waterline from the flybridge.

    I guess I have to consider selling it, which is something I really don't want to do. Shes a pretty girl, and it would be hard to part with her.

    Attachment 75155

  5. #5
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,392

    Default

    You can bring it up - she'll just have to reside a few hours from town.

  6. #6
    Member greythorn3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Chasin the ladys! away!
    Posts
    2,507

    Default

    all our shoreline, whats the problem with lack of marinas? and why is anchorage so unfriendly towards private boats?
    Semper Fi!

  7. #7
    Member JR2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,129

    Default

    Depending on your financial situation there are slips in the private marina in Whittier that can be leased.
    2007 Kingfisher 2825 - Stor Fisk

    Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top. -- Hunter S. Thompson

  8. #8
    Member SockeyeOne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Adirondack Mountains
    Posts
    172

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by greythorn3 View Post
    ..........why is anchorage so unfriendly towards private boats?
    Maybe the big tides in some places make it hard to build and maintain decent dock complexes?

    Dunno.

    Just a guess.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by greythorn3 View Post
    all our shoreline, whats the problem with lack of marinas? and why is anchorage so unfriendly towards private boats?
    Let's see, the mudflats, the need to dredge pretty much anywhere you want to put a boat, and to top it off, nowhere worth boating to near Anchorage. I'm sure you could put a marina in/near Anchorage, but you would have to find someone with a ton of money to pay to dock their boat and not mind having nowhere nearby to go.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SockeyeOne View Post
    I know there are marinas in the Southeast, but what about around Anchorage or Southcentral areas?

    Anyone know of a decent marina in the Anchorage vicinity that would be suitable for a 32 foot sportfisher?

    Thinking of bringing my boat north with me.
    It's been a while, but I know in the past, Whittier had "transient" slips. For those without a permanent slip, they could tie up in a "transient" slip. They had to be okay with people they didn't know tying up next to them and moving their boat around frequently. When you want to head out, you might find yourself on the inside of 3-4 boats and need to do some interesting contortions to slide your boat out and get the rest re-tied before leaving. I don't know if they still have that type of system going there, but might be worth a call to the Harbor Master.

  11. #11
    Member Cap'n Ron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Idaho/Valdez
    Posts
    980

    Default

    I believe Valdez will be building a new small boat harbor soon...not sure if that will make more slips available, the old ones may get filled with commercial boats.

    Valdez is a really nice town with a lot of services including hotels, restaurants etc. and reasonably available marine stuff. But, it is a 6-7 hour drive from Anchorage, people do it for weekends driving late into Friday then Sunday, but probably most would wait for long weekends...then again, maybe you are retired? There are a lot of better places to live in Alaska than Anchorage in the opinion of many Alaskans and us part-timers.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    35

    Default

    A few years ago, there was no wait list in Homer. I kept my boat in a slip there for 2 years while I waited for one in Seward. (Still waiting on Whittier - 12 years later). Kachemak Bay is beautiful boating territory and great halibut fishing. Only drawback was the 4.5 hour drive from Anchorage, or I would still be there. But it would be an alternative to selling the boat, while waiting for a closer slip.

  13. #13
    Member SockeyeOne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Adirondack Mountains
    Posts
    172

    Default

    Thanks for the feedback everyone.

    I'm toying around with the idea of Homer. I'm thinking its going to amount to a 6 hour drive for me. Anchorage would have been a lot closer, but seems like thats a definate no-go.

    There are a couple other Trojan owners in Alaska, so I sent some PM's on the Trojan forums hoping to see what those folks are doing. At least one of those folks is from Anc Vegas. The other one is in Sitka I think.

  14. #14
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    Figure aprox 35 bucks a day for trainseint dockage in whittier. Your problem that boat is to wide for the tunnel unless you have it barged in from seattle.

    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

  15. #15

    Default

    Homer is pretty nice and the harbor folks are accommodating. I'd check there.
    One thing no one has touched on yet besides just parking the boat; marine services.
    Can't speak much for Seward because I haven't been there except for big boat hauls but Homer has 2 boatyards with 2 different methods of pulling your boat; Northern Enterprises has a travel lift and Homer Boat Yard has big hydraulic trailers that can handle your boat with ease.
    So if you need bottom paint, ding a prop and need to swap it, change zincs, etc. that stuff is easily done there (I used to work for one of the boatyards).
    Also there are a variety of marine shops; mechanical, electrical, hydraulics available year round.
    Dont forget that Redden Marine (aka Gear Shed) is there as well. It's a one stop shop for everything from hardware to fishing stuff and after outfitting 2 boats, their prices are generally better than West and they usually have what you need on the spot.
    Check out Quickwater Adventure water taxi/transport services: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Quick...37553606260978

  16. #16
    Member SockeyeOne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Adirondack Mountains
    Posts
    172

    Default

    ^^^^^^^

    Cool. Thanks Jim.

    A hydraulic trailer is all you need to haul my boat for sure. Thats what I do with it these days. Right now its on blocks at a yard on the other side of the lake from me until mid April.

    Just did bottom paint, zincs (magnesium actually here in fresh H2O), and installed new shafts and couplers. (its a 36 year old boat and AFAIK the originals were still on there when I bought it two years ago.) I wasn't into having them checked, so I just replaced them.

    Good info about Gear Shed. Thanks for that. ANYTHING is better then West IMO. Though I tend to deal with Fisheries Supply and Defender the most if I need to go to a big supplier for anything. My shafts came out of Delaware of all places. Small family outfit. I always like doing buisness with places like that when I can.


    The fella I know of in Anchorage has his F-32 in Whittier he told me today.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage and Seward
    Posts
    505

    Default

    If you're thinking of Homer, look across the bay to Seldovia, learn to fly and get an airplane, just another Alaskan toy. A plane, cabin with your boat in Seldovia would be a great setup. I got my pilots license long ago but the admiral didn't like little planes so it's out of the picture but always been the ideal setup for me.

    Seriously, you really need to figure out what you want to do with your boat up here and maybe your Trojan buddy in Whittier can give you some pointers. Prince William Sound offers the best wilderness boating available but really is a camping out on your boat kind of thing. I boated out of Whittier for over 20 years before the tunnel opened up and it was some of the best Alaska boating experiences you could find. You typically head out as soon as you get there and stay out. Anchorages are many and well protected and you won't get stuck due to the weather as often. The town is the pits though so if you're looking for any kind of town life, look for Seward or Homer. Even tiny little Seldovia beats Whittier hands down for amenities IMO. Seward is more of a day boat operation and not as many protected places to anchor up for the evening compared to Whittier. Homer has a few more spots to get out of the weather but again may be more of a day boat operation. If you're a day boater with fishing in mind and want easy access from Anchorage, look at Seward. If you want to head out and stay on the boat and explore, there's nothing like PWS out of Whittier. Be prepared for the rain though. Whittier averages 1/2" of precip a day and it's often horizontal! Homer has less rain and Seward is in between.

  18. #18

    Default

    Yeah forgot to mention Homer has 2 prop shops and a place that will turn a shaft. Once you walk into the gear shed, there's nothing like it and haven't heard that there's another place similar in the state. West is marginal at best and it's surprising anchorage doesn't have better marine stores considering the sheer amount of boats in the area.
    Really a big part of where you keep the boat is your intended use; daytrips? Weekends or longer on the water? Like Brian mentioned; fishing / shrimping? Year-round use?
    Check out Quickwater Adventure water taxi/transport services: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Quick...37553606260978

  19. #19
    Member SockeyeOne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Adirondack Mountains
    Posts
    172

    Default

    All good input guys. Keep it coming.

    I'm not much of a 'day boater'. Around here I generally go out for a week or so at a time. If I had to drive a long way to get to my boat, I would probably take longer, but less frequent trips.

    I haven't ever really thought about the possibility of year round boating before. I don't have that option here, and have never lived somewhere where that was a possibility, but its definately something to condiser. I guess it would give me the option of getting out of the Valley for a couple months if I wanted. Options are always nice.

    As far as use. Around here, if I am not tinkering or being a bum and watching movies onboard, I am usually either fishing salmon or trout or looking for a cool spot of shorline to go ashore and explore. Its mountains and undevelopable (read public trust Forest Preserve) state owned land land on half the shoreline here and I do like to wander around looking for a new view or a secret pond to try fishing in.

    I like shrimp, but I know absolutley NOTHING about being a shrimp fisherman. I guess that goes for Halibut too. I slay the salmon here, but likely technique is different there. Surely I would do some fishing. If I bring the boat I am not selling the gear, so I would just have to learn. If you don't normally use downriggers and planer boards around those parts I guess I will have extra of those items for life. Probably a heap of stremer fly patterns hitherto unknown in Alaskan waters as well.

  20. #20
    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,481

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SockeyeOne View Post
    All good input guys. Keep it coming.


    I like shrimp, but I know absolutley NOTHING about being a shrimp fisherman. I guess that goes for Halibut too. I slay the salmon here, but likely technique is different there. Surely I would do some fishing. If I bring the boat I am not selling the gear, so I would just have to learn. If you don't normally use downriggers and planer boards around those parts I guess I will have extra of those items for life. Probably a heap of stremer fly patterns hitherto unknown in Alaskan waters as well.
    SockeyeOne
    use your downriggers for salmon here.. for Coho it's a toss up, some like to mooch, some prefer the down riggers.. Plus there is always the winter King derby out of Homer where downriggers are preferred.. Nothing quite as much fun as trolling into a hot Coho bite, with maybe a feeder king or two mixed in..

    John

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •