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Thread: 303 British Infield Brass

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    Member Bob the fisher's Avatar
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    Default 303 British Infield Brass

    I am looking to buy some brass (100 pieces) for a 303 British Infield. If anybody has any they are willing to part with, please send me a pm... Thanx... Bob...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob the fisher View Post
    I am looking to buy some brass (100 pieces) for a 303 British Infield. If anybody has any they are willing to part with, please send me a pm... Thanx... Bob...
    Its an Enfield. And I don't have any but you should look at ordering some from black sheep/ white elephant stores In Washington Idaho



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    Check out Grafs.com. They have .303 British brass in stock.

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    Bob-
    The Enfield is a wonderful rifle, whether you have a No.1Mk III of a No. 4. Be aware that used brass has been fire-formed to someone else's rifle. All Enfields have very generous chambers and you can use and reuse your brass for YOUR rifle, but the Enfield was really never meant to be reloaded. It is a war rifle. I do reload for it, as do many others, but I keep my brass segregated between my rifles. When you reload, using a neck sizer is best. If I was you, I would bite the bullet and buy three boxes of cartridges at Three Bears, fire them, and then reload from those.

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    Member Bob the fisher's Avatar
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    Thanx guys for all your advise, I will take it all into consideration and work it from here. You are all awesome... I plan on getting a moose and or caribou next season with this rifle... got some 215 grain Woodleighs, just need the brass to complete... Good hunting...
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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob the fisher View Post
    Thanx guys for all your advise, I will take it all into consideration and work it from here. You are all awesome... I plan on getting a moose and or caribou next season with this rifle... got some 215 grain Woodleighs, just need the brass to complete... Good hunting...
    This is a good site to frequent: http://www.enfield-rifles.com/

    While your Woodleighs are fine, they are overkill. People routinely take black bear, moose, caribou and elk with 150 grain bullets. The 174 grain round point is optimum in the Enfield, and with the correct powder (I suggest Varget), will take about any animal you want to kill on this continent... though I would prefer something harder hitting for brown bear. Save your Woodleighs for bison. Be aware that some Enfields do not like boat tails, that they slug anywhere between .311-.313, and that they may have anywhere from two to four grooves.

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    Member Bob the fisher's Avatar
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    I know those 215 grain bullets are overkill but I couldn't find anything smaller anywhere. I'm sure I didn't look hard enough but I'm tired of looking and they will work just fine. Sooo, that's what I'm guna use... thanx for your advise...
    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    This is a good site to frequent: http://www.enfield-rifles.com/

    While your Woodleighs are fine, they are overkill. People routinely take black bear, moose, caribou and elk with 150 grain bullets. The 174 grain round point is optimum in the Enfield, and with the correct powder (I suggest Varget), will take about any animal you want to kill on this continent... though I would prefer something harder hitting for brown bear. Save your Woodleighs for bison. Be aware that some Enfields do not like boat tails, that they slug anywhere between .311-.313, and that they may have anywhere from two to four grooves.
    "Fisherman for Life" and "Phantom owner Forever"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob the fisher View Post
    I know those 215 grain bullets are overkill but I couldn't find anything smaller anywhere. I'm sure I didn't look hard enough but I'm tired of looking and they will work just fine. Sooo, that's what I'm guna use... thanx for your advise...
    Sportsmans Warehouse has 'em.

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    As previously mentioned the Enfields tend to be generous on head space and case life can be very limited. You may consider buying a couple boxes of quality factory ammo to fire and then use as your brass for reloading. If you do, you can put a small rubber band around the case just forward of the rim. When chambered the rubber band will preload the cartridge back against the bolt face thereby greatly reducing the initial case stretch caused by the generous head space. Subsequent reloads should be neck sized only.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alangaq View Post
    As previously mentioned the Enfields tend to be generous on head space and case life can be very limited. You may consider buying a couple boxes of quality factory ammo to fire and then use as your brass for reloading. If you do, you can put a small rubber band around the case just forward of the rim. When chambered the rubber band will preload the cartridge back against the bolt face thereby greatly reducing the initial case stretch caused by the generous head space. Subsequent reloads should be neck sized only.
    I don't have a 303 Enfield, but I'm gonna pass that along to someone who does and handloads it, and shoots it regularly.

    Thanks

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    Wal, they have rear locking lugs, and I'm told that the action stretches, and that causes some on the headspacing problems, too. Maybe folks are just loading them too hot. ?????

    I've always HATED those contraptions, that Enfield action and rifle, but they have always interested me too, and I can't figger out why.

    They look like JUNK, they look fragile, they look like they wouldn't work, they don't have clean lines, the action looks complex, like it was designed by a committee. I could go on and on.

    History tells me that they aren't JUNK, or fragile, and the design works in spite of the looks. There was a Sporting version that was called the Lee Speed, because the action is FAST.

    They may INTEREST me, because it appears that they would suffice no matter how rough you treat them. AND, they wouldn't show it.

    If I lost one, or broke one, I wouldn't mind, too much.

    I've never been tempted to buy one.

    I just can't get a CONNECTION for that rifle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob the fisher View Post
    I know those 215 grain bullets are overkill but I couldn't find anything smaller anywhere. I'm sure I didn't look hard enough but I'm tired of looking and they will work just fine. Sooo, that's what I'm guna use... thanx for your advise...
    Dunno about overkill, but the 303 has sure accounted for its share of moose in Canada, mostly with standard factory loads. Dunno about today because I haven't been there in a while, but time was, the 303 was probably the most common round used. Good round, and sticking an AK moose with one sounds like a great project. Got a 30-40 Krag carbine I'd like to use someday. Same spirit.

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    Thankyou, got one on my side... that other fella, he don't like em sounds like...
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    Lotta guys are just repeating what they read somewhere, with zero firsthand experience. Turn the page and get on with your life, rather than bothering your mind with them. It's the #1 round in Australia (and lots of neat wildcats based on the case), and they shoot some big nasty buffs with them- on the order of cape buffalo but with more attitude. I've only killed 15-20 deer with the 303 over the years and no moose, so I'll count myself out on more than repeating happy accounts from Canada.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Dunno about overkill, but the 303 has sure accounted for its share of moose in Canada, mostly with standard factory loads. Dunno about today because I haven't been there in a while, but time was, the 303 was probably the most common round used. Good round, and sticking an AK moose with one sounds like a great project. Got a 30-40 Krag carbine I'd like to use someday. Same spirit.
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    Excellent! Great photo. I know several old timers that still speak fondly of their Krags. The old guy I hunted with in my youth had a carbine version he hunted with his whole life. In fact he never owned another gun, and he sure took his share of game. Never any moose, but he sure ate a lot of elk and deer.

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    I have a Krag infantry rifle, and a No4 Mk1 303. I've loaded for both and really have not experienced any brass problems to speak of. Just the typical neck splits from too many loads. I'm not going to spend time annealing cases, so that is the sacrifce I will make. The Krag is one of my favorite rifles to shoot. 220rn's at about 2100fps. The way it was meant to be. Sight radius that won't quit. Nice trigger for a military rifle. Action that is so slick it makes you question if it really chambered a round from the magazine. The Enfield is another great gun, tremendously reliable, simple, and durable. Pretty much everything you want in a military bolt action. Yes, they lock at the rear, but that isn't what causes brass "stretching". It is usually a matter of fitting a bolt head to correct excessive headspace. They are numbered as to size on the bolt head. Enjoy your Enfield, a fun gun to shoot.Click image for larger version. 

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    I would choose the 215 grain bullet, on purpose, I think. Something like the 06, 220 grain.

    Some good things that I've read somewhere about the Lee Enfield, is that the action is very fast. (Sporting versions were called the Lee Speed.)

    It cocks on closing, and after you open the bolt and pull it back, you just hit it with your hand and close it. Because of this. the British had more firepower than competing nations with BA rifles. (They could fire faster.)

    They can be accurate too. I know someone who has a Match Rifle with some kinda match sights, that he shoots very accurately. Of course, he shoots just about everything well.

    I can't understand why the Krag, needed to be replaced as a Military Rifle, so soon as it was. Couldn't they have just come up with a different load, with a lighter bullet? Maybe they felt they needed a magazine that could use stripper clips, but wasn't it fast enough to just drop a handful of cartriges in the box?

    I have a good book, "Bolt Action Rifles" by Frank de Haas, a Gunsmith that tells it all about ALL of them I guess. Their strengths, weaknesses, potentials, sporterizing possibilities, etc. Mine is the "Expanded 3rd Edition".

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    I can't understand why the Krag, needed to be replaced as a Military Rifle, so soon as it was. Couldn't they have just come up with a different load, with a lighter bullet? Maybe they felt they needed a magazine that could use stripper clips, but wasn't it fast enough to just drop a handful of cartriges in the box?
    Smitty of the North
    Well you can thank Teddy Roosevelt for that, he faced Mausers in Cuba armed with Krags and found the Mauser so superior that we copied it with the 03. Mauser sued for patient infringement and won, the huge settlement is a big part of how we ended up in France for WWI.
     
    Anyway, Teddy saw that the Mausers loaded licitly split and clean off a stripper and his guys were loading slow or filling their rifles with crud along with the ammo. He was also impressed with all the other Mauser attributes that lead to most bolt actions being based on the Mauser for all these many years.
     
    So yea the box on the side of Krags vs. stripper clips and Teddy’s first hand experience with both was why the Krag went away for the 1903.
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    Member Bob the fisher's Avatar
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    Well fellas, it looks like I'm back to the ole reliable, this forum. I have acquired just about everything needed to reload the brass for my 303 except two things, they minimum and maximum weight (1) of powder called for on a 215 grain Woodleigh Bullet being loaded into a Remington Cartridge and the Over All Cartridge Length(2). I am using Hodgdon Rifle Powder. Can someone out there please provide this info? I have checked Hodgdon website and they do not provide 215 grain info and I have email Woodleigh (they are in Austrialia) and have got no reply. A moose steak will come your way... Thanx...
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