Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 21

Thread: Any advice on where to find Ermine?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    AK
    Posts
    4,034

    Default Any advice on where to find Ermine?

    I set a box and a few flower pot sets with body grips in a couple spots last year that I thought had ermine tracks. In retrospect I think they were squirrel tracks. Any advice on where to set for ermine, habitat wise?


    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    253

    Default

    I do not know if this is common or not but all of the ones i caught last year were by water ways.

  3. #3

    Default

    Have you got a wood pile.......??? When I run my log-splitter, I just throw the splits in as high a pile as I can, and keep moving the splitter back. So I end up with a lot of huge piles. One year I needed to push a pile with the D-8 and about 10 ermine exploded out in every direction. I am not a trapper, but if I have a lot of poultry and feed on hand, then I have a lot of mice & voles, which leads to lots and lots of ermine eating mice & voles.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Eagle River,AK
    Posts
    1,494

    Default

    Yes, large OLD wood piles or mounds of debris that havn't been moved in a while are good places to start. Almost all swamps and small ponds along the edges, especially if there are any rock ledges or log jams. Other places like under big cut banks along rivers and creeks. Good places to find mink too!

  5. #5
    Member BIGAKSTUFF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    449

    Default

    Im not so sure ermine have a set range or area they stay in, they just come in and kill what they can, when the foods gone they move on. The ones I caught when i was a kid seemed to come around when we started getting voles and mice tracks all around our wood shop and pole barn, then I would see ermine tracks show up, and occasionally see the little fellers.

    A 110 conibear in a box set worked pretty good, but they work fast, so I remember only having about a week at a time to snatch em before they killed their fill of rodents and moved on. A cross wire across your two trigger wires will help, ive had the skinny little suckers go right through a 110 and hit the bait, then come right out without setting the trigger off!

    The trapline we worked would occasionally have ermine tracks come through, sometimes even hit our larger box sets, but it wasnt like it was consistent enough to set up specifically for ermine.
    The Second Amendment.......Know it, love it, support it.

  6. #6
    Member BIGAKSTUFF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    449

    Default

    Something else, my old man would get ticked sometimes if I put sets out at the house for them, he would tell me to let the white assassins destroy the vole population for a while before trying to take him out. So if ya got a mice problem, maybe trapping them around the house is a bad idea...
    The Second Amendment.......Know it, love it, support it.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Eagle River,AK
    Posts
    1,494

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BIGAKSTUFF View Post
    Something else, my old man would get ticked sometimes if I put sets out at the house for them, he would tell me to let the white assassins destroy the vole population for a while before trying to take him out. So if ya got a mice problem, maybe trapping them around the house is a bad idea...
    VERY true! They make good clean up guys around the cabin and can actually be trained for some fun entertainment. We have a few around our place that we even named..

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    northern alaska
    Posts
    1,160

    Default

    When I was flying into an old DEW Line site in the NW Arctic 20some odd years ago. I was flying a crew in there to resurrect and automate the site. We discovered a family of weasels had burrowed into the foamed above ground diesel/heating oil tank. The tank was very large and the ermine had an elaborate tunnel system through the outer foam layer. The "parka" squirrels may have built the tunnels and the Ermine just moved in after eating them up. There were about eight of the all white Ermine in this community. Though it was hard to get them to pose long enough to count em all....

    I definitely would not trap Ermine around my winter place. They come through, as do Marten, and raise hell on the red-backed vole population. They keep them in check. I enjoy seeing their little tracks heading into the rodent holes. Also in Alaska is the "least weasel" an even smaller version of the premier rodent killers.

  9. #9
    Member Tearbear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,986

    Default

    Don't the 'all white' Ermine turn mostly brown for the summer like hares? Or is there a related species that stay white all year round?
    "Grin and Bear It"

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Circle, AK.
    Posts
    616

    Default

    usually anyplace with lots of voles and brushy cover, I don't know anyone that targets weasels but they are usually taken as incidentals in marten sets...........
    I once held the yardstick of anothers perfection, I threw it down and carved my own................

  11. #11

    Default

    Ermine and Weasel are the same animal. My guess is that furriers soon learned the fashion ladies in New York don't want a Weasel coat.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tearbear View Post
    Don't the 'all white' Ermine turn mostly brown for the summer like hares? Or is there a related species that stay white all year round?

  12. #12
    Member Tearbear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,986

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    Ermine and Weasel are the same animal. My guess is that furriers soon learned the fashion ladies in New York don't want a Weasel coat.
    Yes I know that they are the same animal. What I was wondering was if maybe the northernmost ermine/weasels stayed white all year round, or do all ermine/weasels change to mostly brown during the summer. ( I know they change brown in the summer where I'm at. )

    Yeah, women won't wear weasels...
    "Grin and Bear It"

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Eagle River,AK
    Posts
    1,494

    Default

    Tearbear, just like Ptarmigan, Ermine change color no matter the region.

  14. #14
    Member Tearbear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,986

    Default

    Thanks trailblazersteve, I thought so, but wasn't quite sure about the ones living far north.
    "Grin and Bear It"

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    AK
    Posts
    4,034

    Default

    Thanks for all the input fellas! I've been on a bit of a mild taxidermy kick lately and I figured it would be cool to try and tan a few ermine. I did a squirrel recently and it turned out neat.

    I kept reading last winter how "easy" they were to trap, "thats for kids" they said! Then got disheartened when I couldn't catch one! I was out of state for a decent part of the winter which didn't help.

    Thanks again!

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    24

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tearbear View Post
    Don't the 'all white' Ermine turn mostly brown for the summer like hares? Or is there a related species that stay white all year round?
    The reverse is true. Weasels in the south do not turn white in winter. In the Midwest the line is around Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio, where some weasels turn white and others don't. In northern Indiana, where I studied weasels 30 years ago, only about 10% turn white. But as trailblazersteve said, in Alaska they all turn white in winter and all turn brown in summer.

    By the way, if anyone catches a weasel that's around 6-8 inches long, as big around as your thumb, with a 1 inch tail, it's a least weasel and I'll pay $20 for it, whole.

  17. #17
    Member Tearbear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,986

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alpinist View Post
    The reverse is true. Weasels in the south do not turn white in winter...
    I should have been a bit more clear with my question, as I was referring to southern 'Alaska' and furthest north 'Alaskan' ermine, not the south 'lower 48' area ermine. Like I said in post #9, I thought that all ermine did indeed change colors, from white in the winter to brown in the summer, like the snowshoe hare does.
    "Grin and Bear It"

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    AK
    Posts
    4,034

    Default

    I did a little calling last weekend and quite a bit this weekend, saw lots of what I suspect to be vole tracks, very small, about 3 inches apart or so?

    Any advice on the difference between squirrel tracks and ermine tracks? I'm not sure I can tell the difference still.

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    24

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by limon32 View Post
    Any advice on the difference between squirrel tracks and ermine tracks? I'm not sure I can tell the difference still.
    The easiest way is to follow the tracks for a little way to get a sense of the animal's behavior. If it's running from tree to tree, or to piles of pine cone debris, then it's a squirrel. If it looks like the animal was investigating every likely hole where a mouse might be living, or if the tracks often disappear into the snow and emerge several feet away, then it's a weasel.

    The Peterson Field Guide to Animal Tracks has good drawings of squirrel and weasel tracks in the snow. Your local library probably has a copy of the book.

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    AK
    Posts
    4,034

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alpinist View Post
    The easiest way is to follow the tracks for a little way to get a sense of the animal's behavior. If it's running from tree to tree, or to piles of pine cone debris, then it's a squirrel. If it looks like the animal was investigating every likely hole where a mouse might be living, or if the tracks often disappear into the snow and emerge several feet away, then it's a weasel.

    The Peterson Field Guide to Animal Tracks has good drawings of squirrel and weasel tracks in the snow. Your local library probably has a copy of the book.
    Thanks a bunch, I'll check that out... Pun intended!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •