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Thread: Snaring Hares

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    Default Snaring Hares

    Hey guys, I know of an area where the brush is super thick, and hard to hunt, but it seems to have lots of bunnies in it. I was going to snare there, but was wondering if there was anything I should know before I start? I know how to make snares, and know where the bunnies are, just want to make sure I am not missing anything (obviously I am a noobie when it comes to snaring). Thanks for any advice!

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Snaring hares is so simple, even a cave man can do it! Block the trail sides to give them no options, hang your snare at the neck level and you are good to go.

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    Picture hanging wire works really well. If you find a path that has the most activity along it, i.e. widest trail, freshest tracks, lots of nibbled trees around, do just what sayak said, block off the ways around the snare with sticks. The noose should be about 4 in in diameter. Good Luck! Please post some pics if you have some success.

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    I've found that if you can reach any small, live birch branches, put a small pile a few feet on either side of the snare. They love birch twigs and can't often reach them. It's almost a guaranteed bunny in the snare next time I check it.

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    How high should the bottom of the loop be?

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Loop as big as your fist with up-turned thumb. Same measurement for distance off packed trail. Has always worked for me and my students.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    Loop as big as your fist with up-turned thumb. Same measurement for distance off packed trail. Has always worked for me and my students.
    Thanks!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  8. #8

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    for hares a loop as big as your fist with up-turned thumb from ground to bottom of loop is the exact advice I received from my grandfather 40+ years ago. Good to see the same words being used here. He advised just the fist with no thumb for rabbits (not an issue around here).

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    Isn't that a pretty big loop? Seems to me you would be likely to snag a hare around the waist that way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ210 View Post
    Isn't that a pretty big loop? Seems to me you would be likely to snag a hare around the waist that way.
    Perhaps you have a fist the size of a catchers mitt(?). For the rest of us, a five finger fist sized loop, fist height above the trail is perfect.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ210 View Post
    Isn't that a pretty big loop? Seems to me you would be likely to snag a hare around the waist that way.
    I cannot say that has ever happened, though when I started out many years ago hanging them too large, I caught some by the back legs... never fun to come upon a hare caught that way.
    Year before last I had an Outdoor Ed. class of 13 students that cleaned up un bunnies around the school. All were cleanly neck caught using this method... but your milage may vary.

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    Well I actually had already set the snares before you guy convinced me that the fist plus thumb was the size to use. I made them about 4 inches wide and 4-6 inches off the ground. I set 7, and caught 2, not sure how that good is, but it caught supper!

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    I use my hand as a method of measurement. The palm is a good size for the hoop and the length of the fingers from the palm to the tips is the hight the snare is suspended off the trail for snow shoe hares. A proven method I used for 35 years. Set it in the middle of the trail, make sure the overhang pole not too low where you tie the snare to. At least a foot above should do the job. Break a few twigs and branches and place on both sides of the snare, forming a fence. It don't take much to keep the hare centered on its trail.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ210 View Post
    Well I actually had already set the snares before you guy convinced me that the fist plus thumb was the size to use. I made them about 4 inches wide and 4-6 inches off the ground. I set 7, and caught 2, not sure how that good is, but it caught supper!
    6 inches off the ground is almost where I set for fox at 8 inches. I kept having a hare set off a snare I had set at that height, I guess his back was rubbing it as he went under. I lowered it almost down to the ground and caught the bugger the next night by the neck, stone dead.

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    Well it seems pretty straight forward (after all your guys' advice) how to catch the bunnies, so the next question I have is, how do you stop critters from taking the rabbit after it is snared? I always check my snares every 24 hours or less, but it seems about 50% of my snares are raided... I did notice the ones that weren't taken, were the ones that were snared neatly around the neck, and was wondering if maybe it was just solely the struggling that attracted the predators? On one that was taken, the wire was totally snapped, so I blamed it on a dog as it was within a mile from houses. There was a bunch of blood near the snare, and at first I was afraid I might have snared a pet or some bigger animal, but I examined a tiny piece of fur that was left, and it was obviously a rabbit. To fix that problem, I will just make sure to set away farther from houses. The next one that was stolen, all there was left was a tiny pile of guts. No fur, not much blood, no carcass, not much of anything was left as evidence. Unlike the previous one, the snare was still there, and it had been pulled tight and had a ring of fur left on it. The 3rd and last one that was stolen, was just pecked on by a magpie, so to fix that problem I will try to put snares where they are less visible from the sky. The one thing to note on this one is that it wasn't snagged quite as neatly around the neck, and had one foot caught as well, so it may have attracted predators with its struggling. Well that all said, if you guys have any advice on how to prevent my snares from getting raided, I would appreciate any tips!

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    I first snared hares in Manokotak in the late 70s. I had a garden up by the house I built (small green house below the water tower in old KMO) and wanted to kill the buggers who were raiding my garden. I had to learn how to do it right.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ210 View Post
    Well it seems pretty straight forward (after all your guys' advice) how to catch the bunnies, so the next question I have is, how do you stop critters from taking the rabbit after it is snared? I always check my snares every 24 hours or less, but it seems about 50% of my snares are raided... I did notice the ones that weren't taken, were the ones that were snared neatly around the neck, and was wondering if maybe it was just solely the struggling that attracted the predators? On one that was taken, the wire was totally snapped, so I blamed it on a dog as it was within a mile from houses. There was a bunch of blood near the snare, and at first I was afraid I might have snared a pet or some bigger animal, but I examined a tiny piece of fur that was left, and it was obviously a rabbit. To fix that problem, I will just make sure to set away farther from houses. The next one that was stolen, all there was left was a tiny pile of guts. No fur, not much blood, no carcass, not much of anything was left as evidence. Unlike the previous one, the snare was still there, and it had been pulled tight and had a ring of fur left on it. The 3rd and last one that was stolen, was just pecked on by a magpie, so to fix that problem I will try to put snares where they are less visible from the sky. The one thing to note on this one is that it wasn't snagged quite as neatly around the neck, and had one foot caught as well, so it may have attracted predators with its struggling. Well that all said, if you guys have any advice on how to prevent my snares from getting raided, I would appreciate any tips!
    This year would be harder than most, since there are a lot of hungry predators.

  18. #18
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    I have lost snares and rabbits to predators as well.
    One time there were wing marks in the smow so it was obviously a bird that stole it. And it made off with the snare and all. Musta jerked pretty hard to break it off the alder brush the way it did.
    There probably isn't much a person could do other than to place them so there is more cover from above so birds cannot see the snared hare.
    As for predators on the ground I think you are out of luck on that one as you are probably just going to loose a few.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ210 View Post
    Well it seems pretty straight forward (after all your guys' advice) how to catch the bunnies, so the next question I have is, how do you stop critters from taking the rabbit after it is snared? I always check my snares every 24 hours or less, but it seems about 50% of my snares are raided... I did notice the ones that weren't taken, were the ones that were snared neatly around the neck, and was wondering if maybe it was just solely the struggling that attracted the predators? On one that was taken, the wire was totally snapped, so I blamed it on a dog as it was within a mile from houses. There was a bunch of blood near the snare, and at first I was afraid I might have snared a pet or some bigger animal, but I examined a tiny piece of fur that was left, and it was obviously a rabbit. To fix that problem, I will just make sure to set away farther from houses. The next one that was stolen, all there was left was a tiny pile of guts. No fur, not much blood, no carcass, not much of anything was left as evidence. Unlike the previous one, the snare was still there, and it had been pulled tight and had a ring of fur left on it. The 3rd and last one that was stolen, was just pecked on by a magpie, so to fix that problem I will try to put snares where they are less visible from the sky. The one thing to note on this one is that it wasn't snagged quite as neatly around the neck, and had one foot caught as well, so it may have attracted predators with its struggling. Well that all said, if you guys have any advice on how to prevent my snares from getting raided, I would appreciate any tips!


    Cats will leave a gut pile. Canines eat everything including the teeth.

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    I'd start with shooting all the neighborhood cats.....even if I wasn't losing bunnies to them

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