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Thread: Methods for Dispatching Trapped Animals

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    Default Methods for Dispatching Trapped Animals

    What are your preferred methods for dispatching animals in your traps? I have heard of various methods from strangling to kneeling on their chest. I am new to trapping and would prefer not to have a bullet hole in my furs. I imaging having a wolf or a lynx on the end of a strangle wire would be insane! Please share any successes or failures you've had with very methods.

    Thanks!

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    Member Ak_Predator's Avatar
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    A buddy of mine told me once how to do it without a snare or .22 pistol. After coming into my first successful lynx set a few years back I gave it a go and had good results.

    I pulled a rotten birch tree/stump, basically a stick the size of my forearm and maneuvered it into a position to crack it over the head. Once it was stunned I put one foot over its throat and stomped its ribs, breaking them into its lungs and kept my foot over its throat. It's back paw came up and put a pretty good gash through my Carhart bibs, so I grabbed its paw and pulled up while holding my foot over its throat. It went limp and I checked it for life by poking its eye.

    It was a pretty brutal way to go about it, but it worked really well with no pelt damage at all. After thinking about it, I figured it was a little too brutal for my taste and I started carrying a spare snare that was designated for just dispatching animals. A lot easier and less hazardous to my bibs...

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    for a live wolf or wolverine a 22 is the best option, for all others a snare pole is by far the best method unless maybe you have a lynk or coyote by the toe then a 22 might save you one getting away. It's best to shoot them behind the front arm as there is a market for skulls if there's not a bullet hole in it...............
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ak_Predator View Post
    A buddy of mine told me once how to do it without a snare or .22 pistol. After coming into my first successful lynx set a few years back I gave it a go and had good results.

    I pulled a rotten birch tree/stump, basically a stick the size of my forearm and maneuvered it into a position to crack it over the head. Once it was stunned I put one foot over its throat and stomped its ribs, breaking them into its lungs and kept my foot over its throat. It's back paw came up and put a pretty good gash through my Carhart bibs, so I grabbed its paw and pulled up while holding my foot over its throat. It went limp and I checked it for life by poking its eye.

    It was a pretty brutal way to go about it, but it worked really well with no pelt damage at all. After thinking about it, I figured it was a little too brutal for my taste and I started carrying a spare snare that was designated for just dispatching animals. A lot easier and less hazardous to my bibs...
    While your method works and is one I have used in a pinch. It is best to send this type of advice in a PM. There are antis that troll this site that will use anything they can against us and your method doesnt sound to "humane"

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    I like 22 shorts for coons an coyotes. I shoot the coons in the head and the coyotes in the lungs, both go down fast and never had a fur buyer say one word about the tiny holes... Foxes I tap across the nose/head with a stout stick and then snap their necks by placing one hand under their chin and the other behind the neck - kills them instantly. Don't try that with a coyote as they are too strong and you will have a VERY mad coyote to deal with - I know!

    I bought a pellet pistol a cpl weeks ago to try on coons and at 600fps it does not do the job.
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    Dont ogre bludgeon em' over the head if you are gonna try the rap-and-knee method. You will have quite the mess when you skin out the head if you do....It just takes a light rap to stun, for coyote and smaller of course
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    Member Ak_Predator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bsj425 View Post
    While your method works and is one I have used in a pinch. It is best to send this type of advice in a PM. There are antis that troll this site that will use anything they can against us and your method doesnt sound to "humane"
    I hear ya... Thought about it after I posted. Not too worried about offending that type too much. They can find other articles to read if my postings offend their delicate little hearts. Appreciate the heads up though!

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    I ilke a .22 CB in the ear hole. Instant and humane.

    I don't really want to touch a trapped critter- while we really don't have much in the way of rabies, an animal bite carries all sorts of stuff you'd rather not contract. I value my hide more than anybody values the ones I catch!

    I've largely went to connibears for what little trapping I do these days.
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    A friend of mine used a ball ping hammer to dispatch fox in the Aleutian Is. The tool makes for a nice fish whacker as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wet eNuf View Post
    A friend of mine used a ball ping hammer to dispatch fox in the Aleutian Is. The tool makes for a nice fish whacker as well.
    I'm with Hodgeman on this one. About 30 years ago I keelt a coon with a claw hammer during hand to paw combat. Can't say I would ever recommend it.
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    I show the critter a pic of Chuck Norris and they just die of fright.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Anymore, for me, on coyote and larger, and sometimes on fox too depending on how theyre caught, I use a 22lr.

    Quick, pretty humane, and the hole is so small it hardly needs stitching. It does make skinning a touch messier though.

    I've heard of people using 330 conibears on a pole (and that might be pretty quick and not damage the hide) but it seems like that could be a goatrope. I've also seen video of using a snare on a pole to dispatch lynx....wow, is all I got to say about that!! Effective, but quite a dance with some sharp claws...

    I have gotten to where I use conibears and snares by far more than footholds, just for the lack of hide damage and for dispatch issues. I'd much rather have a critter in a killer style of trap or snare, than have it fighting a trap for a day or two, or more.

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    Member Ak_Predator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    I show the critter a pic of Chuck Norris and they just die of fright.
    Well played, sir! Well played!

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    Trapping is an economic game as well as recreation. You want to maximize your return on your catch. Wolf, wolverine, and lynx all have easily saleable skulls. Redfox are too common but white fox will sell. Killing an animal in a manner that damages the skull takes away income from that animal. I'm sure some would want skulls for display also.
    Lynx die quickly in a snare. A snare on a 3 or 4 foot pole will dispatch a lynx as humanely as any bullet with no damage to the pelt or skull and little risk to the human.
    Canines die less quickly in snares. For fox, a rap on the bridge of the snout will stun them long enough to grab behind the neck and kneel on the chest. This does involve some risk to the trapper but can be done.
    Wolf/wolverine are not the kind of animals you want to handle pre-death. A 22 or other small cal bullet to the chest will dispatch quick enough and not damage fur or skull noticeably.
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    I use a .22 on anything still alive. The hole is not an issue since most furriers throw the face away anyway. It is a small hole that is easily sewed up if the face is used in crafts. I wash blood and dirt as well as fleas away with dog shampoo. Fur can be damaged especially if the animal is in a snare while still alive. Care should be taken to avoid over tightening of the snare when standing on the chest cavity or neck area which could be damaging to guard hairs. If the animal is in a foot hold trap, a sharp rock or stick under the body could do damage to the pelt when standing on an animal during the dying quivers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ak_Predator View Post
    A buddy of mine told me once how to do it without a snare or .22 pistol. After coming into my first successful lynx set a few years back I gave it a go and had good results.

    I pulled a rotten birch tree/stump, basically a stick the size of my forearm and maneuvered it into a position to crack it over the head. Once it was stunned I put one foot over its throat and stomped its ribs, breaking them into its lungs and kept my foot over its throat. It's back paw came up and put a pretty good gash through my Carhart bibs, so I grabbed its paw and pulled up while holding my foot over its throat. It went limp and I checked it for life by poking its eye.

    It was a pretty brutal way to go about it, but it worked really well with no pelt damage at all. After thinking about it, I figured it was a little too brutal for my taste and I started carrying a spare snare that was designated for just dispatching animals. A lot easier and less hazardous to my bibs...

    A fur buyer that didn't like holes, ANY holes in a pelt once told me to stand on their chest so they couldn't breath. He said if you can't do that, then shot em through their ears. I don't think he was getting docked on his end because the furriers throw the face away. He just didn't like the blood around the head because back then, we paid his kid to skin our catches for $2 a pelt, and maybe his kid complained. I just shoot them in the head. I little grey matter seeping out doesn't bother me. I have brain tanned before so no biggy. Some people just want to see the anima in the least, unmolested sort of way. Maybe it clears their conscience. Enter Sigmund.

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    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    I've found that without any holes in the head, I can skin a canine and keep the hide so clean that all it doesnt need any additional clean up (other than fleshing of course). If there is a hole in the head, the blood runs into the fur when I'm case skinning that leaves enough blood in the fur that I need to wash it in a 5 gallon bucket which complicates the stretching and drying process for me. It tends to matt the hair, stick to the boards and requires a bit more work to get them presentable, IMO.

    That said, I will still shoot them if in a foothold.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dkwarthog View Post
    I've found that without any holes in the head, I can skin a canine and keep the hide so clean that all it doesnt need any additional clean up (other than fleshing of course). If there is a hole in the head, the blood runs into the fur when I'm case skinning that leaves enough blood in the fur that I need to wash it in a 5 gallon bucket which complicates the stretching and drying process for me. It tends to matt the hair, stick to the boards and requires a bit more work to get them presentable, IMO.

    That said, I will still shoot them if in a foothold.

    I hear you, but here is what I do. Anal or not. I skin them, then check for burrs, sap and such, anything I can get out. Comb it, then in a 5 gallon bucket, put some dog flea shampoo and cold water in it. rinse the hide well and let it soak for 10 minutes. Then take the hide out, dump the water and rinse it again. Keep this up until the water stays clean. Usually 3-4 dumps. Then I hang the fur up by the nose in the shed and put a box fan on it. I might have to pop it a time or 2, turn it around so the air circulates on it good. Don't blow dry it unless you want the fur to slip. but in a few hours, the fur is dry, clean and ready to be tanned or stretched after fleshing, which on a fox is almost nothing. I have a back porch, and this is where I do it at. When I open up the house door, it stays about 55 degrees in there. The last one I got was soaked and muddy so had to do it bloody or not. Once it is dry, you can pop it, comb it whatever. There really isn't any mats in the fur. It combs nice. Maybe it is the conditioner in the shampoo. lol

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    Depends on which fur animal you catch. For fox and lynx we use a pole with a cable attached to the end such as a dog catchers pole or a .22 lr pistol. But in my game unit, it's illegal to shoot or dispatch a wolf with a rimfire round. I pack a 22 hornet along the trap line for taking care of wolves. Be sure to check your regulations in the game unit you are trapping in.

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    I like to think it is more humane to shoot them than the choke them down over the course of a minute or 2.

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