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Thread: Bison Tactics

  1. #1
    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    Default Bison Tactics

    Spent last Sat/Sun trying to fill the daughters Bison tag. Got good help from the land owners and looked like it wouldn't be too hard to get a shot. Find a herd in the field. Walk down the opposite side of the windrow till close to herds location. Sneak thru the windrow and look for a clear shot.
    Doesn't sound too hard, eh? Problem is, there are 50 sets of eyes, ears, and noses to detect you. On the far side of the windrow, your hidden. As you approach the edge to get clear shooting, your visible. Or the animals stay out in a field beyond your shooting distance limit and no way to approach under cover.
    Now that there is snow, I'm gearing up with some sort of white or snow camo pattern. But I'm looking for advice from others who have hunted the Delta area. What tactics served you?
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    Member uh60baldwin's Avatar
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    Default

    Try using http://www.cabelas.com/product/Monta...oy/1335297.uts I have seen them at a few places in Fairbanks I think
    sportsmen's has one they work very well on antelope.

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    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    Lots of patience. It took us many trips and lots of stalks, many folks wrongly assume this thing is a cake walk, it is perhaps one of the most frustrating hunts i have been on. Our best luck was to find a tract with sign and be in position very early in the morning. Black and Peterson farms are good. And of course Diana's farm is great. I know of a fantastic spot come March if you dont connect soon.
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  4. #4
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    Default bison tactics

    wear white and use a moose decoy. go slow


    [QU


    OTE=martentrapper;1341826]Spent last Sat/Sun trying to fill the daughters Bison tag. Got good help from the land owners and looked like it wouldn't be too hard to get a shot. Find a herd in the field. Walk down the opposite side of the windrow till close to herds location. Sneak thru the windrow and look for a clear shot.
    Doesn't sound too hard, eh? Problem is, there are 50 sets of eyes, ears, and noses to detect you. On the far side of the windrow, your hidden. As you approach the edge to get clear shooting, your visible. Or the animals stay out in a field beyond your shooting distance limit and no way to approach under cover.
    Now that there is snow, I'm gearing up with some sort of white or snow camo pattern. But I'm looking for advice from others who have hunted the Delta area. What tactics served you?[/QUOTE]

  5. #5
    Member Steve_O's Avatar
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    Check with Wrigley Farms as well. My friend got a nice bull there two weeks ago. Missed book by 1" He was a big boy. Like you said stay in between the windrows and get ahead of the heard. Patience is your friend. Good luck they are there just got to be in the right place at the right time.

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    Default bsion tactics

    these guys go where they want, have no certain feeding times or patterns like moose. I had to be there before sunrise when I went. they tend to move at night and feeding before sunrise. If you have to go through a gate try and make sure they aren't close before u go though. Find out where they have been you will see that on the ground. Get ahead of them if you can like bou. They see better than eagles , have a nose like a white tail, and are never alone. When one spots you tails go up and when they take off they dont stop till they get tired which is seldom close. Aim for the lower third because thats where the heart is. If you spot a heard, try and find your cow/bull as a loner. Get just close enough for a good shot and shot till they drop. If you can find some hay bales to hind behind great! Good luck.

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve_O View Post
    Check with Wrigley Farms as well. My friend got a nice bull there two weeks ago. Missed book by 1" He was a big boy. Like you said stay in between the windrows and get ahead of the heard. Patience is your friend. Good luck they are there just got to be in the right place at the right time.

  7. #7

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    When you find them, leave your truck running, and make sure the light doesnt come on inside. This isnt as easy of a hunt as everyone portrays it to be. And like mentioned before, get a hold of Dianne Schultz. Shes a sweetheart of a lady, and will flat out tell you if theres bison on her property or not she will tell you. They are usually there though... Good Luck. I didnt fill my tag, but I'd love to have another shot knowing what I know now!!!!!

  8. #8
    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    Was on the Wrigley farm Sun. morn. Lots of moose but no Bison. Some tracks there tho.
    Peterson farms are no longer open to hunters they said.
    Have ordered some snow camo stuff. I'm thinking a decoy hunter on one side to attract their attention and the shooters on the other side. Most of the animals we saw didn't run but kept moving away from us.
    We will definately need to be out before daylight.
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

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    Default after you're busted but before they run

    This reminds me of one really fun technique to do after your group's presence is known. Especially those times that the game knows your location and stays "just out of range" and any moving closer causes them to skedaddle.

    Try giving up one member of your group as bait. Since they know your presence and aren't spooked yet have your bait walk away, quartering away from them. If its too quiet to hear the bait leaving then he should scuff his feet quietly, or make other very minor noises.

    Game animals use (huge amounts of) instinct to successfully dodge dangers very very well. But instincts fall short when there are two dangers (the bait, plus the shooter) instead of one.

    It isn't unusual for your quarry to stay put the entire time that the bait is retreating visibly, allowing plenty of time for the shooter to advance or prepare for the shot.

    This bait technique is very hard to do when hunting solo. But I have used it successfully by dividing my quarry's attention between me and some half inch ball bearing projectiles hurled silently by a high end slingshot. Slow, high, silent shots work best, especially if you're close enough to get the ball bearings on the very far side of your game.

    Fun stuff to recall.

  10. #10
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    Hope this helps... I spent a few days during moose season and the second week of October getting to know most of the land owners and trying to figure out where the buffalo roam... Definitely not like any other hunt I've been on but very rewarding once you punch your ticket. Here's my advice as it led to my son's success after blowing a couple stalks.
    Obtain permission on all three sides to hunt.
    SouthWest of Saw Mill Creek (C1, C3, B, G1, G2 & G3)
    NorthEast of Saw Mill Creek (N, P South, J1, R3, T1, T2 & T3)
    NorthEast of Gerstle (7, 8D, 8E, 9D, 9E)
    The buffalo work the creek/river bottoms and stay close to the thick cover. They seem to group up for a few days then break up into small groups a lot more often that I initially thought. If you have land on all three sides, its a matter of finding fresh sign. They will revisit an area normally close to the same time as the previous sitings if food is available. When spooked, they'll run until tired or the thought of danger is far behind them. Very impressive to see them stampede out of an area.
    My strongest suggestion is to gain access to G1, G2 & G3. Your list says its owned by Karen Olsen. However, she doesn't own those parcels any longer. Most of you know her name due to her owning the Matanuska Dairy or whatever was the proper name. She is indicted and sold her land to the Robinsons (C3). The son lives on C3 and the dad has a new ranch home as you enter G2 (across the road from the Wrigely's) They planted peas this past summer which the buffalo destroyed. On the back edge of G1, running northeast (follow the road) there's a buffalo trail that looks like a brush hog cut it that runs down the hill across Saw Mill Creek onto the Schultz's property (N). When someone on Schultz's land spooks them, they'll run down that path into the cut outs on G1. If they are traveling to the Schultz's from that side of creek, they'll also cut through and use this trail.
    Diane Schultz is a wealth of knowledge. As mentioned previously, she'll give you the 411 and point you in the right direction even if you don't want to hunt her land. She does charge and runs it very well. We elected not to hunt it due to the costs and having to remove the buffalo completely off her property without gutting. Not an easy task so I'm glad we opted not to do it....
    P South. Good property that you can hunt but you'll most likely have to knock on the door to get access.
    J1- Owner is from Wyoming. Great guy that doesn't care if you hunt so long as you respect his land. Not in the state until next spring. Does have a local guy watching over but just introduce yourself if approached. Trying to sell that parcel of land and the buffalo definitely access it.
    The Wrigely's (C-1) planted oats this past summer which the buffalo will continue to visit. As you probably already know, they are great people and will let you hunt without any fees.
    R3- Steve. Will let you hunt if you stop and ask him. Big pasture down the hill from his house where they see buffalo quite often.
    T1, T2 & T3. Stop at Silverfox Roadhouse and ask for the caretakers name and number. They'll let you hunt if you can get a hold of them. Herd of 200+ there during our trip.
    7- Nadine Black (322-3933) Really great people. Buffalo like their property due to where it sits. No big fences keeping them out and plenty of food and cover. They charge if successful so I wouldn't make this my first stop.
    8E- Roger Hendry. Old sourdough that loves company. Very well stocked bar and plenty of stories to make most of it taste good. Oversee's (9E & 9D). Will give you access to all of it if you call and stop by to chat with him. Buffalo tend to hang out on the North and Northeast areas of his land.

    As far as stalking them.... Use the wind just as they do. Most of the ones that we saw were feeding into the wind. A lot smarter than the indian books I read years ago made them out to be... If you see a large group, try not to focus on the main herd but on the stragglers. From what we saw, the big bulls normally stayed towards the front and always had a group of other buffalo close to them. Stay in the edge of cover when moving and when you see them, take cover and move slowly using good concealment. Hopefully this helps some and if by chance you have other questions, please don't hesitate to call (947-3829) or email (douglasgoodwin@gci.net). Good luck and be safe!

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    Thanks for the post and replies! Goody, you are a wealth of info. Thank you! Good luck on your hunt Martentrapper! I drew this season as well, for a cow. Due to work and other commitments I won't be able to hunt - probably - until later in the winter and so any tips and info are greatly appreciated! If I can help anyone else that drew and plans to hunt this winter I am up for helping. Don't have lots of funds for access fees so hoping to find areas to hunt that don't charge. I still giggle a bit inside when I realize I drew a permit after putting in for so many years and that I am fortunate enough to have the opportunity to hunt this season! I am definitely thinking a lot about making sure I properly identify a cow if I get the chance for a shot!

  12. #12

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    I'm just curious, thinking about putting in for next year. I realize each landowner is different, but what do trespass fees range to and from?

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    Access fees for the ones that charge range in the $300-$350 range. Each have their own stipulations such as the Schultz's not allowing any processing on site. Diane stated that gutting an animal serious impacts her hay growth so their require you to remove the animal ungutted off their property. The access fee also only applies if you're successful. Personally, there's no need to pay the fee if you follow my guidance in my previous post. If they are on the parcels requiring an access fee, just obtain access to neighboring property and have some patience. They do move and move a lot....... Find their travel routes and you'll find success.

  14. #14
    Member Martinezpj90's Avatar
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    Goody, I know this is a older post but I am reading every piece of information out there since I got drawn for the 17' - 18' bison hunt in delta. I appreciate all details in your post below but was there any gear requirements that you wish you had that you didn't or any things looking back you wish you did differently or had in preparation for the bison hunt.

    Thanks
    patrick
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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Thanks for pushing this to the top. I also drew DI403. I am pretty excited. I am going to use a sharps!

  16. #16
    Member Martinezpj90's Avatar
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    Trying to find any information I can to help in the aiding of my efforts of taking a Bison. my thoughts are on taking a 338 win mag and some good knives. someone uses a "Raptor Razor" to cut up a bison and it seems to work pretty good and the angle keeps from cutting into the guts. thought about trying those out as well.
    The devil whispers, "You cannot withstand the storm."
    The warrior replies, "I AM the storm!"

  17. #17
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    I am going to take a battery operated sawzall with a long blade. Unless a tractor is available I will quarter bone in gutless method and use the sawzall for ribs ect. My FIL has a safe full of Sharps that he won at various competitions. I am going to use his Sharps Montana Highlander in 45-70. He has made me a mould that pours a 503 grain boolit that has a mice melplat. He is in process of working up a duplex hunting load..I will goto MT in may to formally commission (ie smoke a bunch of BP out of it) the rifle.


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  18. #18
    Member Steve_O's Avatar
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    Don't pass up on looking across the road in the panoramic fields. I have seen them there as well. Also check on the military lands behind Donnelly dome. I have seen herds back there as well. Good luck. Someday I'll draw that coveted tag. Guess it would be like shooting fish in a barrel for locals if we got the tag. )

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    The herd currently seems to be spread out over 50 miles with some sighted at end of Cummings Road and others at Donnelly Dome area.

  20. #20
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve_O View Post
    Guess it would be like shooting fish in a barrel for locals if we got the tag. )
    From what I remember about Delta Junction in the winter time......I'd say you folks would deserve it...!!!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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