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Thread: real or perceived threat to Alaska Moose

  1. #1
    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    Default real or perceived threat to Alaska Moose

    In 1492 Native Americans discovered Columbus lost at sea
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    If I come across as an arrogant, know-it-all jerk, it's because I am

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    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    Apparently, Rick's sky is falling.

    Ticks, and brainworm and CWD, oh my!

    In my opinion only, I dont have a ton of confidence in anything Rick Sinnot says.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dkwarthog View Post
    Apparently, Rick's sky is falling.

    Ticks, and brainworm and CWD, oh my!

    In my opinion only, I dont have a ton of confidence in anything Rick Sinnot says.
    Just because you don't care for the messenger doesn't mean the message is invalid. The parasite and disease issues now being experienced in the Yukon are not a figment of Mr. Sinnot's imagination. Environmental conditions in Alaska are no different than those of the Yukon, and an arbitrary line that defines the border will not stop those parasites and disease from spreading to Alaska. It's only a matter of time.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
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    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
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    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    I agree with the fact that there are valid concerns to be considered regarding invasive species (ticks). I am not a bio and shouldnt play one on the internet.

    Nonetheless, I find his writing style to be rather fatalistic and leaves me to wonder what the real message is or will be. In other words, what solution will he come up with to solve this "crisis"? Plastics Recycling? Solar Power? Shoot every deer you see on sight? Kill wolves? What???

    "Massive Moose Die-offs, Is Alaska Next"!!!! Sorry, to me this just seems like Micheal Moore style journalism....

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Has anyone on this forum seen ticks on a moose? I never have, but I'm not saying that they never get them.

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    Member Tearbear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    Has anyone on this forum seen ticks on a moose?
    Yeah I've seen ticks on a mouse...

    Mouse with Ticks HPIM0558.jpg

    Oh pardon me, it's moose, not mouse...
    "Grin and Bear It"

  7. #7
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tearbear View Post
    Yeah I've seen ticks on a mouse...

    Mouse with Ticks HPIM0558.jpg

    Oh pardon me, it's moose, not mouse...
    You must be Canadian.

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    Member Tearbear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    You must be Canadian.
    No...I'm an American, though I'm not quite as proud to be one now, as I used to be.
    "Grin and Bear It"

  9. #9
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tearbear View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    You must be Canadian.
    No...I'm an American...
    ...And so are Canadians.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
    #Resist

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tearbear View Post
    No...I'm an American, though I'm not quite as proud to be one now, as I used to be.
    I was making a play on the oo v ou sounds.

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    Member Tearbear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    I was making a play on the oo v ou sounds.
    I figured you were...
    "Grin and Bear It"

  12. #12

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    Don't think it can't happen. Although there is no correlation....

    Here in Ohio our tick problem has magnified over the past dozen years. I used to routinely shoot whitetails and find few to no ticks in the fall. These days, the deer are carrying ticks all winter long in some cases. I have seen deer with tick infestations on them in December.

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    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    Saw a pic somewhere, once, of ticks on a moose. Plenty of ticks on snowshoe bunnies when they get populous.
    Sinnot is regularly the harbringer of doom and gloom. And he is regularly wrong.
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

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    Member BlueMoose's Avatar
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    Here is your answer. Read this a while back!

    Ticks in Alaska
    By Riley Woodford
    caption follows
    The tick Dermacentor andersoni (female)
    Ticks, small blood-sucking arachnid parasites, are not well-known in Alaska. But Alaskans should be on the lookout for ticks this summer.

    “All too frequently I hear from both vets and the public, ‘We don't have ticks in Alaska,’" said Kimberlee Beckmen, a veterinarian with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

    One species, generally found on squirrels and hares, is common in Alaska and native to the state, but those aren’t the problem. It’s the introduction of non-native, potentially disease carrying ticks that’s a concern.

    Beckmen was recently sent ticks from Juneau, Sitka, Anchorage and other Alaska communities for identification. Beckmen consulted with an expert in Georgia who helped identify the different ticks, which included the American dog tick, the brown dog tick and the Rocky Mountain wood tick. Most were found on dogs, and all the dog ticks were non-native. It was the first time they’d been identified in the state.

    “We don’t have dog, deer or moose ticks in Alaska, and we don’t want them here,” she said. Ticks carry Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tick paralysis, Lyme disease, Q-fever, tularemia and other diseases - and many of the diseases affect dogs, wildlife and people.

    One tick came from a dog in Sitka, a dog that had just come up from Oregon. That tick was a species that carries Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Beckmen said. One tick came from a dog that had never left Juneau. Two more ticks came from dogs that had never left Sitka.

    “Veterinarians and the public are not generally aware that we can have these ticks and tick-borne diseases,” Beckmen said. “Last week I had a vet ask me about a strange case in a dog that involved paralysis, and I said he should consider tick paralysis – and that was not even in his mindset, it’s not something Alaskan veterinarians would think to look for."

    Ticks can come to Alaska on dogs, and on farm animals like cows and horses.

    “We have had them come up on people,” Beckmen said. “People driving up or flying up with pets can bring the ticks up here.” Last July, a woman whose friend returned to Fairbanks with his dog from Wisconsin and discovered she was carrying a tick, presumable that was transported on the dog.

    Beckmen said livestock are required to be inspected when they’re brought into Alaska. “If you’re bringing a cow up to Alaska, it has to be examined by a veterinarian for ticks.”

    caption follows
    Dog, deer and moose ticks aren't native to Alaska, but could survive here if introduced. There is one native species, generally found on squirrels and hares.
    That’s not the case with pets, so it’s important the owners inspect or treat their pets.

    “Our current climate can support the life cycle of many of these ticks, once they arrive,” Beckmen said. “The only thing to prevent this is to keep them from arriving. People should look for ticks and treat their dogs with a tick repellant if they are coming up. I use a product on my dog that helps repel mosquitoes, but it also repels ticks and fleas. There are several different products available from veterinarians. If people have friends coming up to visit, make sure they alert their friends they should use a tick treatment on their dog before they drive up.”

    Treatments are easy. A few drops of the product are applied to the skin along the dog’s back, and the treatment is good for many weeks. Beckmen said that flea and tick collars do not work well.

    Ticks can survive and overwinter here, Beckmen said, and with a changing climate, additional species of ticks may find Alaska suitable. One species, Ixodes angustus, is common on hares and squirrels. “That’s not a concern because it’s been here, it evolved here, and we aren’t asking people to report those. But we are really on the lookout for the moose winter tick. That can come up on somebody’s horses, on cattle, bison or elk, or on free ranging wildlife – it is found in Canada and the lower 48.”

    Research has shown that the moose winter tick, Dermacentor albipictus, can reproduce and survive in Fairbanks and Palmer. “If it is introduced, it will likely become established,” Beckmen said.

    The moose winter tick is a very serious health issue and can kill moose, and calves are especially vulnerable. The ticks cause the moose to itch and scratch, breaking and losing substantial amounts of hair. A moose with typical infestation can have tens of thousands of ticks and experience significant blood loss.

    Beckmen detailed the disturbing amount of moose blood an infestation of ticks can suck in a couple months. An adult moose has about 32 liters of blood in its body, and an infestation of ticks can consume 40 liters of blood in two months – meaning the animal must more than replace its entire blood volume

    caption follows
    A "ghost moose" calf - heavily infested with moose ticks and suffering from substantial hair loss. The pattern of hair loss is representative of the infestation.
    Blood loss, heat loss, and spending more time scratching than foraging, combined with the hardships moose experience in winter, take a lethal toll.

    “They often die in a state of starvation in January or so – and the hair loss is at its most obvious, that’s why they call it winter tick,” Beckmen said. “It’s naturally found in areas like Alberta, but it’s moving north as the environment is warming up farther north.”

    The Department of Fish and Game encourages Alaskans to submit specimens if they find ticks. Contact dfg.dwc.vet@alaska.gov or bring ticks to your local ADFG biologist. Ticks can be brought in live, frozen or preserved in alcohol, in a tightly sealed container please.

    “The biggest thing is for Alaskans to be aware and on the lookout for ticks,” Beckmen said. “Those ticks can make dogs sick and make people sick.”

  15. #15
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueMoose View Post
    Here is your answer...
    Bah, that Beckmen is just another sky is falling doom and gloomer, just like Sinnot. I think we should heed the advice of the internet opinionists, and embrace baseless denial.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
    #Resist

  16. #16

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    My money is on the ticks...In a society that places wild dogs on equal footing with ungulates, there can be no other possible outcome.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
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    Member Mkay's Avatar
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    Don't know about the moose/mouse ticks, but when Rick S. was on point in Los Anchorage, seems like every time a citizen called about about a bear, Rick showed up with guns blazing.
    My child was inmate of the month at Mat-Su pre-trial Correctional facility.

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    Member Bambistew's Avatar
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    My wife killed a sheep in the DCU a couple years ago that had ticks on it. The bio in Fairbanks wasn't too worried about it.

  19. #19
    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    Has anyone on this forum seen ticks on a moose? I never have, but I'm not saying that they never get them.
    I didn't see any, but sure did see the effects! I suffered mysterious flu like symptoms right after hunting season. Fever to 103, in bed for nearly two weeks, no nausea, no gastric distress, but severe muscle pain and fatigue. I also gained over ten pounds, while eating nearly nothing the first week. Getting out of bed long enough to stoke the fire exhausted me enough I had to lie back down. Liver enzymes shot up, salt levels dropped, protein levels dropped. Finally a doctor told me that he had seen my symptoms before, in people who had been bitten by a tiny, sometimes microscopic tick found on moose. It just so happened that I had guided a hunter to a moose, packed, skinned the moose, as well as a bear and wolf. I caped the moose, and packed the cape back to camp. I also packed the bear and wolf hides back to camp; therefore I had by far the most contact with the hides of any of the hunters, and I gave any beasties on the hides a new refuge in my pack, and access to my body through that pack. All three species have been known to carry ticks, and ticks that carry the virus/parasite that put me down. A month and a half later, I feel better, but still have swelling in my legs and elevated liver enzymes. I don't think Sinnott's sky is falling this time; but we may be in for some rough times ahead! Times, they are a changin'!

  20. #20
    Member Yukoner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Akres View Post
    My money is on the ticks...In a society that places wild dogs on equal footing with ungulates, there can be no other possible outcome.
    Wolves (Canis Lupus) are not wild dogs, dogs (Canis Lupus Famillaris) are domesticated wolves. That's sort of putting the cart before the horse.
    Never wrestle with a pig.
    you both get dirty;
    the Pig likes it.

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