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Thread: Older Lake Hood crash

  1. #1
    Member Bsj425's Avatar
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    Default Older Lake Hood crash

    Dont remember seeing this video. Any thoughts on it why such a short take off looks like there was plenty of channel left to the right.


  2. #2

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    Here's the ADN story on the crash: http://www.adn.com/2009/06/07/822923...ard-plane.html Sounds like they thought it was a gust of wind right at takeoff. You can see the leaves fluttering on the bushes in the video as the plane approaches.

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    You can also see the wind blowing the wake from the planes right to left indicating a cross wind.
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    06/07/2009 ANC09CA050

    He had over 3,200 feet of lake left in front of him. He was a 500 hour private pilot with only 20 hours in a Beaver.
    I use this video as a training aid.

    While the FAA later said there was only a 3 knot wind, the wind sock and video of the trees in the background show it as a little more on the lake itself.

    He starts his run with a plow taxi and tail wind. And as we all know, being on the plow makes the nose go away from the wind. So his plow turn down in the eastern part of the lake is pretty wide.

    Then to make matters worse, he appears to have incorrect aileron input for what is now a cross wind from his right wing. ( see wind sock in video.)
    I have seen this with folks who were trained for their float ratings on calm days. Some schools teach to start your take-off run with the yoke or stick of to one side and hold it there until one float lifts. I do not....

    Another problem is that he never pushes the nose down to truly get up on the step. ( Did he not try or was he loaded with a very aft CG??? ) Thus any cross wind will continue to push the nose away from the wind. And it means he was not accelerating as he should have. Particularly since he was holding the wrong cross-wind correction, thus giving his left-side (port) float have more drag than the right float. Some low time float pilots will try to yank the plane off the water much too early if they are placed in a stressful situation. Like the tower telling you to hurry up.

    At that point he was along for the ride and not controlling his aircraft. The right wing picks up some wind and the right float comes out of the water. Now he has water induced drag on only the left float and he turns ( almost pivots) even further towards the shoreline.

    At the last second he gives the correct right side down input to the ailerons, but he also tries to climb out of ground effect. So he was doomed.

    Video Times:

    00:00 to 00:16 seconds. Too wide a plow turn with tail wind turning into cross-wind.

    00:17 to 00:30 seconds. Incorrect aileron input ( opposite) for the cross wind from the right wing. Note right float higher in water.

    00:32 to 00:34 seconds. Right float breaks clear of water and the plane pivots left due to water drag on left float and wrong aileron input. Plane slams back into the water and heads directly towards the teenage kid who was filming.

    00:38 to 00:43 seconds. Pilot finally reverses ailerons and starts a right bank into the wind. Also tries to climb over fence and stalls .
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    Member Bsj425's Avatar
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    Thanks for the breakdown float pilot. I have never flown but have always had an interest in aviation and like to live through your posts and youtube I came across this one yesterday and thought it was interesting especially with a few hundred feet of lake left just to the right of the plane.

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    The guy flying the beaver is an orthopedic surgeon. He crashed his C185 a year or so before this beaver crash and his wife bought him the beaver for his birthday or Christmas or something. He had less than 40 hours in the beaver. The weather at Lake Hood that day was pretty normal. The wind was a slight quartering tail wind from the right at 5 knots or less, not enough for the controllers to reverse the direction of takeoff, and very standard conditions for the westerly takeoff.


    The doctor had his wife and maybe a child or two or a dog...can't remember...but in any event was not over loaded. No one was injured in the wreck. He failed to maintain adequate directional control on his take off run toward the mouth of the channel that connects Lake Senard to Lake Hood. As he got close to the channel entrance he tried to roll the right float out of the water, but didn't have enough airspeed and that manuever caused the aft portion of the left float to dig in causing the plane to swerve a bit to the left. He then yarded (yanked) the plane out of the water and stalled out for lack of airspeed. I don't think his wife will buy him another plane.

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    had his wife and maybe a child or two or a dog...can't remember

    From report ANC09CA050
    Crew= 1
    Passengers = 3

    Pilot total time
    512 hours All Aircraft:
    Total hours in Make/Model: 21 hours


    Departing Lake Hood, with a destination of Bulchitna Lake, AK

    Stuff happens,,,,, it was just his turn for it to happen to him....
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    The nose was too high throughout the take-off run. Torque was pulling left and the high nose/north breeze made it worse. It was probably the heaviest he'd ever flown that plane and he probably didn't trim it for the load. I've made that error. My plane started to porpoise and I aborted the run right in that very spot. The "no delay" take-off clearance probably had him out of his comfort zone as well. Nobody's perfect. :-)

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    I should have prefaced my previous post with "It appears that". I'm no expert on that or any other accident.

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    Does anyone know if the airplane was repairable? You guys have told me how tough these airplanes are.

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    For the sake of family survival, the wife would do better spending her money at a shopping mall and not get in any plane the Doc was piloting.
    Very lucky on that one.

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    The current info claims that the tail number is no longer assigned to an aircraft.
    But since it is FAA info, who knows......Maybe the registration expired and it is still in parts someplace.

    This guy has some good still photos.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/31242357@N07/3605858358/


    I would not be so quick to throw stones about this pilots flying. We do not know who taught him, nor what they taught him. And sometimes we all get in a hurry, or we goof-up a little thing, that later turns out to be a big thing...
    I have goofed up more than once. I was lucky it was not on video.
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    Thanks for the photos, those are good. What happens to the engines when the props get bent and they come to a sudden stop like that? Does it bend the rods and lock up all the cylinders?

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    The old timers say "If you are going to crash, the beaver is the plane to crash in. It is one of the toughest bush planes out there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 44minimum View Post
    Thanks for the photos, those are good. What happens to the engines when the props get bent and they come to a sudden stop like that? Does it bend the rods and lock up all the cylinders?
    Each accident or incident is different, but if damage is evident to prop or rotor blades. A tear down and non destructive inspection "sudden stoppage" All steel parts are carefully checked for cracks using magnaflux process; all cast components are checked for cracks using dye-check process. Ultrasonic inspection is used on all applicable crankshafts and cylinders.

    A little rusty as I have not bent wrenches in a long time, but that is the just of it.

    Much would depend on what damage you find as you go and what part of the FARs the mishap aircraft is/was operating under.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    The current info claims that the tail number is no longer assigned to an aircraft.
    But since it is FAA info, who knows......Maybe the registration expired and it is still in parts someplace.

    This guy has some good still photos.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/31242357@N07/3605858358/


    I would not be so quick to throw stones about this pilots flying. We do not know who taught him, nor what they taught him. And sometimes we all get in a hurry, or we goof-up a little thing, that later turns out to be a big thing...
    I have goofed up more than once. I was lucky it was not on video.
    I appreciate that you're trying to be "politically correct" here, Alex, but let's face it: There was no real need for a downwind plow turn, unless he was trying to warm the Beaver's engine, which I very much doubt. He never got the Beaver up on the step, and was clearly trying to show off the Beaver's short field takeoff abilities. We've all been asked to expedite a takeoff, so I can't give that much credence as an excuse for the pilot to get so far behind the power curve. He may have been distracted by the family dog, but I doubt that as well. His previous C-185 accident should have made him a bit more cautious with his flying, but apparently it had not. The negligent winds shouldn't be considered much of a factor, either. This low-time pilot simply blew what should have been the easiest and routine of water takeoffs. The airplane load apparently was minimal, as far as Beavers are concerned; and I wouldn't give much of an excuse to water in the float compartments, though I suppose that's possible.Finally, he was for some reason trying to use less than half the available takeoff water length in order to make a high performance takeoff. A little right rudder would surely have kept him aligned with the channel and away from the south shore there.

    This entire episode would appear to fall to "pilot error", period.

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    Knowing when to abort a take off is part of pilot training and good airmanship. It was painful to watch the video. Particularly where he try's to horse the aircraft off the water to no avail the first time. Big red flag...NO GO!

    It would be interesting to know the chain of events that lead to this accident and so many more like it.

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    Member mit's Avatar
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    There are a lot of words in this thread to say that...... He screwed up!
    Tim

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    The plane was completely rebuilt and is now airworthy. We bring our plane to the same shop that did the rebuild....it was there a long time.

    Beautiful plane again, never heard of how it flies after.

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    I appreciate that you're trying to be "politically correct" here, Alex
    There are only so many surgeons in the state and he might know my spine surgeon.....(:
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