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Thread: turret press info

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    Default turret press info

    looking at getting a RCBS turret press for reloading seeing what peoples experance with them has been. I have a single stage and want the turret press for doing 44 mag rounds dont need the progressive press for the amount I shoot.

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    I'd get a T-7. Nothing wrong with the RCBS but if your comming that close on the money why not go Redding. SW Wasilla had 2 in stock the other day.
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    I don't know what you expect to gain with a turret press but if it's speed of loading, I would keep the single stage as I haven't been able to load much faster with either of my two turret presses than with any of my single stage presses. The redding is a good press but other than giving you a place to store a couple of die sets, The amount of time saved is basically how long it takes to switch dies. Even with screw in dies that's not much.

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    Agreed, if looking foe speed progressive is the only way to go. If looking for speed and just one handgun caliber the Lee progressive kit may fill the bill quite well for about the same money as a quality turret. They work fine once adjusted so for one caliber they are pretty dang good.
     
    Iíll never give up my Rock Checker, Hornady AP, or Dillon but I sure like having a turret on the bench because itís just so handy. Itís so handy to always have a decapping die and bullet puller set up in the back holes all the time. Nice to be able to go back an operation without pulling and re-adjusting any dies If a guy is set to drop a couple hundred on a turret press may as well go on and get the T-7. But no, itís not going to appreciably speed things up normally, just makes it a tad less of a pain to switch around on the fly.
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    I have often thought about getting a Dillon 550 but just have not. I have two RCBS Rock Chucker presses set up, one with an older Piggy Back system set up on it. While the Piggy Back is OK and I do use it for loads that are not even close to max charges, I find my self using my single stage more. Some of my loads are at max for my pistols and I want better control over them. I also shoot different bullets and resetting them on the Rock Chucker is a lot easier. I do know shooters that do have Dillon's set up and they 'swear' by them. But they are also the ones that shoot LOTS of ammo of the same load.
    There are pro-cons of all system, it just depends on what you want to do and how much time you have.

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    I run a Redding T-7 and like being able to keep several dies setup in the press. I also like using the Hornaday Lock-&-Load conversion in my Rockchucker to do fast die changes while maintaining the settings.

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    AK Bearcat itís no harder to change a Dillon or Hornady progressive than a single stage, just your setting up each station just like you would in the single stage. Then you can crank out 50 or 100 rounds like nothing. If you want a different bullet you only change that station, changing powder only changes one station . . . just like a single stage only you have all the stages set up at once.
     

    I like Dillon but donít think Iíll buy another because the Hornady L-N-L AP is every bit as good as good as a 650 for the price of a 550 . . . And it has the L-N-L bushings so itís a little more nimble to change things out than Dillons where you swap the whole top plate. Convert your other presses to L-N-L and soon all your dies are set up and just snap into whichever press or hole in the progressive you want, cool set up.
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    I'm a noob reloaded but do have a few hundred loaded rounds brewed and fired under my belt now. I purchased an RCBS single stage but my bench was to thick to mount it (ram assembly rocks back and hits the facia). I ended up going T7 because it was a turret and fit. I keep my 6.8 and 280AI set up all the time since I have been working up loads for both. As a guy who reloads around work and kids activities the "little bit" of time savings has led to me being able to get more loading done in the evenings. I dialed in my dies and they were good to go for the duration of load work up. All I had to do was swap powders and start loading rounds each evening.

    I suppose it may just be a mental victory but reducing the number of steps needed to produce ammo makes me more likely to actually do it when I have limited time.

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    ok is their any real reason to get the T-7 over the RCBS turret press. I know redding has a good rep on having the best die, but is the RCBS press lacking in some way compared to the T-7. one thing to me is the RCBS press is almost $200 less and comes with the priming tool the T-7 you have to buy that.

    I think loading pistol rounds like 44mag ( which i am not loading by the 1000 ) will be a lot fast with a turret press compared to a single stage press

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    Never used a T-7 but everything i have read they are great presses. (T-7 does have one extra die station than the RCBS)
    I do own a RCBS turret press and like it alot. I keep all the dies per caliber set up on individual turret heads and when i want to change from one to the other, i just change the turret and it is already set up. Oh with a turret press you can have a separate seat and crip station on the same turret head.
    They are by no means close to a progressive in speed but they are faster than single stage, my old rock chucker is now religated to primer removal. I hand prime with RCBS universal primer tool so could not tell you how the primer feeder works on the press.
    just my 2 cents
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    The quality of the T-7 is just superb, RCBS is good but the deference is like that between a Rock Island 1911 and a Less Bear 1911 . . . Both work just fine but one is just clearly better made. T-7 sits back on the bench better so less overhang and less wiggle around when doing heavy work. Extra die station on T-7, itís built like a tank and the linkage geometry seems better . . . not sure but I think it has a longer ram throw.
     
    T-7 is $280 at Midway, RCBS is $213, I didnít look at the price at Sportsmanís but usually they are less than Midway+shipping. So if you have your eye on an RCBS for almost $200 less ($100ish) Iíd jump all over that.
     
    Another very good option to look at is Lyman T-mag, Iíve never used one but everyone that has one raves about it and itís about same money as RCBS. I have an old Lyman All American, itís not my best press but is the one I most use.
     
    Your not going to save much time loading 44mag on any turret over a single stage. If you do 100 rounds on a single in say an hour a turret may cut that time to 55-58 minuets. Speed isnít what turret presses are about, they are about flexibility. Being able to switch around between operations and calibers easier, still takes the same amount of moving cases and pulling the lever.
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    AD is right on. Speed wise there is little difference. The only real advantage I have found is you can load one complete round at a time but that only works well with a three or four station head. Deprime and size, turn head, prime and expand neck, turn head, powder, turn head seat bullet and crimp. This will be slightly different depending on your dies. This way you can load as many complete rounds as you have time for. Say you only have half an hour, you can load 50 or so complete rounds rather than having 200 sized and primed cases and no loaded ammo. My go to press is also an old Lyman All American unless I'm loading a bunch of ammo then it's the Dillon 550b.I f I was going to shell out $300 for a press I would go a bit further and get a Dillon 550 or the Hornady LnL progressive. It only hurts for a while but the joy of having a good progressive and the time savings will last a lifetime. And don't get rid of the single stage as you're going to want it as well. And no you probably don't NEED a progressive until you've had one for a little while. An easy 400-500 rounds per hour is addicting.

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    I've been considering a T-7 for awhile, and I think I'm going to make the investment, but I'm disappointed that the turret is only threaded to accept 7/8"-14 dies. That means in addition to the unit's cost, I have to take a turret to a machine shop and pay the not insignificant cost to have at least one station bored and threaded for larger dies.
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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    I've been considering a T-7 for awhile, and I think I'm going to make the investment, but I'm disappointed that the turret is only threaded to accept 7/8"-14 dies. That means in addition to the unit's cost, I have to take a turret to a machine shop and pay the not insignificant cost to have at least one station bored and threaded for larger dies.
    For why, quick change bushings? 1-ľ-12? Might could help with that, been wanting to tap some stuff to that for the Hornady bushings but the tap is about $70.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
    For why, quick change bushings? 1-ľ-12? Might could help with that, been wanting to tap some stuff to that for the Hornady bushings but the tap is about $70.
    Not QD bushings. I'm not presently in the same place as my loading bench, so am limited to working from memory tonight... I have at least one die that's oversized (seems like I have two, but I can't recall at the moment); the one I'm thinking of right now is a RCBS carbide sizing die for 500L. I think it's 1 1/4-12.
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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    Not QD bushings. I'm not presently in the same place as my loading bench, so am limited to working from memory tonight... I have at least one die that's oversized (seems like I have two, but I can't recall at the moment); the one I'm thinking of right now is a RCBS carbide sizing die for 500L. I think it's 1 1/4-12.
    Should be 1-ľ-12 cuz that is what the newer Rock Chucker presses with the bushing is. Also what Lee 50bmg dies are but RCBS/Hornady 50bmg dies are 1-Ĺ-12 so if they are cut down BMG dies could be ether . . . Donít know if a 1-Ĺ hole would fit on the T-7 without hitting the tower or something.
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    I have the early version of the Lee Turret Press. With 4 hole turrets and dies for 38, 357, 44, and 30-30.

    I'm satisfied that I can load those cartridges much faster than if using a single stage press, and I discomboomerated the thingy that turns the turret. I turn it by hand.

    I use the Lee 4 die sets. Think about it. Isn't it faster AND easier than screwing 4 dies in and out as in a single stage? The only thing I have to adjust is the seating stem on the seater die if switching bullets.

    OK, I'm using it LIKE a single stage, BUT it's faster. I say, a lot faster.

    The Redding T 7 would be an improvement, if you're loading modern rifle cartridges, but it is not needed for handgun loading. I had one of the older Redding turret presses for awhile. It had only 6 holes and it was slanted backwards for some reason.

    I sold it and later got the Redding Big Boss Single.

    I'm afraid of those progressive loading systems. I'm quite sure they wouldn't work for me at all. I like to do things like clean pps,uniform pps, trim case lengths, and other things that don't seem to be part of the "progression".

    I ain't all that interested in speed, anyhoo. What's time to a hawg?

    Go ahead on and get the Lee Turret press
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    I'm wondering why anyone thinks you have to adjust dies when removing and replacing them. Adjust them once and lock the set screw and you can switch them all you want without readjusting them. A single stage and a turret each takes the same effort and movements to load one round. The only difference is the time it takes to remove and replace a die rather than turn the head. And seeing as how you only change dies once each per loading secession a turret can only save a couple of minutes tops. I've loaded a lot of ammo on both a single stage and turret presses. Speed difference is very minor unless you are loading very small quantities of ammo.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    I have the early version of the Lee Turret Press. With 4 hole turrets and dies for 38, 357, 44, and 30-30.

    I'm satisfied that I can load those cartridges much faster than if using a single stage press, and I discomboomerated the thingy that turns the turret. I turn it by hand.

    I use the Lee 4 die sets. Think about it. Isn't it faster AND easier than screwing 4 dies in and out as in a single stage? The only thing I have to adjust is the seating stem on the seater die if switching bullets.

    OK, I'm using it LIKE a single stage, BUT it's faster. I say, a lot faster.

    The Redding T 7 would be an improvement, if you're loading modern rifle cartridges, but it is not needed for handgun loading. I had one of the older Redding turret presses for awhile. It had only 6 holes and it was slanted backwards for some reason.

    I sold it and later got the Redding Big Boss Single.

    I'm afraid of those progressive loading systems. I'm quite sure they wouldn't work for me at all. I like to do things like clean pps,uniform pps, trim case lengths, and other things that don't seem to be part of the "progression".

    I ain't all that interested in speed, anyhoo. What's time to a hawg?

    Go ahead on and get the Lee Turret press
    The little Lee turret is a not to bad deal and does fine on pistol rounds. Itís kinda fiddly and the plate moves up and down but a very serviceable unit for something like 44mag.
     
    Donít save much time though unless you move back and forth in the operations a bunch. Now if your comparing thronging the charges with the powder measure that comes with the Lee to dipping or weighing charges that saves boo coo time. Fix for that is a powder measure, thronging charges will pace a bunch over not thronging them.
     
    Progressive ainít no harder than single stage. Itís just all the operations stet up one at the start instead of as ya go . . . Still each operation sets up just the same way one at a time. If I want to puts around with the brass I just knock out the primers and prep it however (tumble, trim, burr, uniform, whatever) before I go to the progressive with it.
     
    You can also pull them off a progressive at any time and stick um right back. Just ifin you want to put it back where it came from donít pull the lever while itís off and ifin you put it back at the start dump any powder out first.
     
    I love progressive, did without for years and years cuz Iím cheap hearted but never no more! Heck even if I do everything else single stage and trickle every charge I still stick um on the marry go-round to seat and crimp, saves me a whole time of handling each one and pulling the lever.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbuck351 View Post
    I'm wondering why anyone thinks you have to adjust dies when removing and replacing them. Adjust them once and lock the set screw and you can switch them all you want without readjusting them.
    Long as your sticking it back in the same hole thatís true. I got so many presses and never remember where it was so I donít bother to lock those with locks (Lee just has an O-ring and I like that better) and adjust each time. Ainít hard to adjust them, just run them down to touch the shell holder then go up or down the required amount from there. Used to put witness marks on seating dies but donít even bother with that anymore, I can dial them in right quick.
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