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Thread: Did I make a bad choice?

  1. #1
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    Default Did I make a bad choice?

    So my friend and I are planning a Nov deer hunting trip down at Sitka. We'll get drop off at a cabin by a friend's boat somewhere down there. This will be my very 1st hunt so I bought need to buy everything from ground zero. My friend told me that I need some good rain gear so I looked around Cabela's and bought the Dry-Plus breathable wader. I started searching on the internet and realized that there're not a whole lot of people wear waders for big game hunting. So, did I make a bad choice? Should I go to Sportman's Warehouse and get something else?

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    In my opinion, which doesn't mean much, unless you are going to be constantly wading through creeks and swamps, it may not be the best choice. However, its not a bad choice either. If they are ankle fit (I'm not familiar with that particular one) or they are stocking foot and you can wear good boots, then the waders and a non-gortex rain jacket will work fine. My brother did it on a very wet caribou hunt.

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    I hunt moose almost exclusively in waders, and also for deer if not scaling steep stuff that requires more rigid boots. I hunt in my breathable simms waders with stocking foots and have used several good rubber bottomed wading boots over the years to great success.

    The modern breathable wader is fantastic for this kind of hunting. If there is any precip, the vegetation is going to be soaking wet. Wool gets wet and heavy and takes forever to dry out, hip boots suck on side hills and the water pours off of your jacket into you boots. Breathable waders will dry given any kind of heat and even without.

    So no, you did not make a mistake. Five years ago i started hunting with a crew of hip boot wearers......now all three of them bring waders and wear them often.

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    Waders can be indispensible for a boat based hunt and quite useful for any hunt near swamps or bodies of water. I usually bring along hip waders when I am hunting from a vehicle (as opposed to packing in on foot). That said I have no idea how useful they will be for the hunt that you have planned. For deer hunting I usually bring a set of light weight packable rain gear to go in my day pack and a heavier set ( http://www.amazon.com/Helly-Hansen-I...nsen+impertech ) for days when rain is certain. For footwear I like Irish Setter Rutmasters ( http://www.amazon.com/Irish-Setter-R...tter+rutmaster ) in really wet conditions but I see folks wearing Muck boots and Xtra Tuffs as well.

    I haven't hunted that area though so maybe someone with local knowledge can chime in with better recommendations.

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    This is the wader I bought http://www.cabelas.com/product/Barga...3Bcat105697080

    It suppose to be able to convert into waist wader if needed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by vincentmoy View Post
    This is the wader I bought http://www.cabelas.com/product/Barga...3Bcat105697080

    It suppose to be able to convert into waist wader if needed.
    If I was you I would bring them for sure. I would want to bring another option as well though. I haven't done a hunt entirely in waders myself though as others have. I think it depends on how you hunt. Boot foot chest waders don't seem optimal for the miles that I typically walk on a deer hunt but for you they may be perfect.

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    Treat them like rainpants......with boots.

    The ones you picked up will be great for in and out of the boat, and for easier terrain. I have a set of those and they are not the greatest hikers as the ankle support is pretty light. If you are not looking to acheive 1000 ft plus elevation, you should be fine. The other SE standard is a waterproof pant, then sealskin socks in your regular hiking boots. Your feet stay largely dry, the socks dry pretty quickly, and you still have decent ankle support.

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    I thought the SE standard was XTRA-tuffs and Grundens. I'm so confused.

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    I'd go with the Juneau dress boots,(xtra tuffs) and the new light weight Helly Hanson rain gear, unlike the old light weight rain gear the new ones are 100% water proof.

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    When wet weather hunting, its nice to have two towels just for stuffing in your waders each night, so's you can have a good day , the next day. wet cold feet are no fun, or even just damp, and that guarenteed in any rubber type boots.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catch It View Post
    I hunt moose almost exclusively in waders, and also for deer if not scaling steep stuff that requires more rigid boots. I hunt in my breathable simms waders with stocking foots and have used several good rubber bottomed wading boots over the years to great success.

    The modern breathable wader is fantastic for this kind of hunting. If there is any precip, the vegetation is going to be soaking wet. Wool gets wet and heavy and takes forever to dry out, hip boots suck on side hills and the water pours off of your jacket into you boots. Breathable waders will dry given any kind of heat and even without.

    So no, you did not make a mistake. Five years ago i started hunting with a crew of hip boot wearers......now all three of them bring waders and wear them often.
    +1! Best move I ever made. I used to hunt in ankle-fit hippers and they worked well, but after 1hr of climbing, the boots would be wet inside (from sweat) and would stay that way for the duration of the hunt. I can turn the breathables inside out at night and get them dry easily in a cabin with a heat source or by putting the neoprene boot section between my sleeping bag and my pad for the night. Dry feet every morning.

    I always carry them for cabin deer hunts in SE. If it's gonna be one of those fall snotty rain days, these are my first choice - with an Impertech jacket.

  12. #12

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    I've found myself wearing my breathable waders more and more for hunting. The down side is you will get sweaty if you exert yourself too much, but the plus side is; they are easy to turn inside out and dry overnight. There isn't any other footwear I can think of that you can easily dry every night.

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    Default Did I make a bad choice?

    Kenetrek boats with sitka storm front pants... 4 season and never been wet.
    Do I give my friends advice? Jesus, no. They wouldn't take advice from me. Nobody should take advice from me. I haven't got a clue about anything..

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    The only thing I have to add to this is that breathable waders are noisy in the brush and susceptible to rips, gouges and tears. If you have to bust brush just on the lower slopes, you might consider a tough outer layer like the Helly Hansen Impertech bibs just until you get above treeline or out of the brush. It really quiets them down and reduces your chances of damage substantially. Yes, you will get condensation inside, but once you shed them, you're back in business.

    I'm not a real fan of Cabela's outerwear, to be honest. But these waders might be okay. I just have no experience with them, so I can't say for sure.

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    Quote Originally Posted by akmike30 View Post
    Kenetrek boats with sitka storm front pants... 4 season and never been wet.
    Just curious, will that keep you dry on the north slope? I've yet to see a leather boot keep anyone's feet dry sloshing through that stuff for more than a couple miles. Thats just been my observation though.

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    first I don't think I would try hunting in them. Dryplus is a good product and the breathable waders are nice but they will be wet inside after a days hike, you will feel like a clam,lol. I use wool insoles and change them out and open them down to the boot. Second I have a pair of dryplus pants that I have had over 6 years now and at the end of the day the outside will be wet but I will be bone dry underneath. may I sugest a boot dryer that can be pluged into a 12 volt batt I have some that can go into a wall outlet or batt and they do a real good job. I would go buy a small 12 volt batt (batteries plus has them ) it's about 3' by 3' by 6' so it not to big and heavy to put in your gear and if your going in by boat there shouldn't be a problem with weight. I also use mine to charge my gps when out for multiple days. you may want a little bit bigger batt depending on how much you may use the dryer. You will need to be carefull on the brush, crawling over logs, ect as they may get torn up. I would take them now that you have then, hell you may have water you need to get across, there where times I wished I had mine deer hunting. Good luck I expect a good story.

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    As stated elsewhere above, I don't think you can go wrong with x-tra tufs and Grunden or Helly Hansen rain gear. It's my go to gear when hunting in Prince William Sound rain which is similar to SE rain.
    An opinion should be the result of thought, not a substitute for it.
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    Honestly, I just hunt in wool pants (I'm from Juneau and have hunted a bunch in the rainforest) my experience is any rain gear that will keep you dry in the stuff southeast throws at you will keep your sweat in. I stay just as dry without rain pants as I do with them! Also I like soft fabrics for crashing through the brush (try to make very little unnatural noise)

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    Quote Originally Posted by sambuck12 View Post
    Just curious, will that keep you dry on the north slope? I've yet to see a leather boot keep anyone's feet dry sloshing through that stuff for more than a couple miles. Thats just been my observation though.
    My kennetreks are wet inside after a full day in wet grass, what I don't know is if that is from sweat or water. I oil mine about twice a year.


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    Quote Originally Posted by sambuck12 View Post
    I've yet to see a leather boot keep anyone's feet dry sloshing through that stuff for more than a couple miles. Thats just been my observation though.

    Dry feet is a relative term. I get wet feet (sweating) in rubber boots. Gore-tex Meindls keep my feet dry enuff. Got to run a new pair of LaCrosse Alpha Burly's this week. Superior to the Xtra Tuffs for hunting with some steeps in the mix. Xtra Tuffs just don't get much traction and I prefer a stiffer foot bed. For anything steep, slimy, covered in wet snow, or frozen like a rock, it's corked Meindls.

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