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Thread: Winterize my outboard?

  1. #1
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Default Winterize my outboard?

    First winter with an out board. 50hp Yamaha what do I need to do to ensure it'll start next spring?
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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Stabil in the gas, run it a bit to get it through the system.
    Fog it.
    Grease it.
    Keep it vertical so water does not gather in the prop and freeze.

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    Member markopolo50's Avatar
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    I would certainly change the oil in the lower unit before winter. If any water got in there it could be trouble. I change mine every year. I treat the gas also but run my carbs out of gas on my Merc 75. Not sure about running out of gas if yours is fuel injected?

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Oil has all been changed...
    Can do the stabil
    No idea what
    Fog it is
    How do you keep
    It vertical? Take it off the boat or just tilt it up?
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    if it's 4 stroke I wouldn't worry about fogging it....store it standing up so all water can drain out. I wrap mine with some heavy felt fabric to help keep the winter "dust" out & cover up my steering rams also.

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    Member .338-06's Avatar
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    Fogging is pulling the spark plugs and spraying 'fogging oil' in there. I was also taught to hand crank the cylinders while fogging.
    I may be slow, but I get where I'm going!

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    Member BluNosDav's Avatar
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    Is winterizing and/or fogging necessary, if the motor is stored inside a heated garage or basement?
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    Member tzieli22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BluNosDav View Post
    Is winterizing and/or fogging necessary, if the motor is stored inside a heated garage or basement?
    Kinda but not really. Look at it like this. Any motor that sits with gas inside its engine, may gum up some if it's bad gas, cost to repair a Yamaha 50hp 4 stroke fuel system = $100 to $1000. Stabile = $5 bucks

    Lower unit drain and refill with new fluid = $10 buck. Water in lower unit = if it freezes or is in there you have issues, so it makes sense to inspect annually. While it won't freeze if inside, it's good to at least inspect it and know if you have any issues or not. Better to fix in the winter if you do rather than next season.

    Keeping your engine vertical or up and down. You don't want water building up in the prop or lower unit. Water that freezes will crack your lower unit housing. Cost to repair or replace lower unit housing, $500 to $2500 depending on your engine and crack.

    Fogging engines, I don't normally do this with my 4 strokes but do it for 2 stokes. Again, $5 bucks for a can, or $$$ if your rings stick or you have other issues. (Back in the day I used a squirt of oil in the cylinders or wd-40 and moved the pistons around to lube the rings. But as I said, I don't do this with my 4 strokes.

    Hope this helps some...
    Last edited by tzieli22; 10-27-2013 at 08:25. Reason: Typo
    Tony

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    Member BluNosDav's Avatar
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    Thanx Tony,

    Mine is a carburated 25hp 2-stroke Yamaha jet. I always use Stabil in my fuel/oil mixture, since I don't use this motor very often, and it doesn't burn that much fuel when I do. The last time that I used it, at the end of the trip, I disconnected the fuel line from the tank, and motored around the ramp area for a few minutes, until it ran out of gas, then rowed into shore. When I got home, it was hung vertically on it's wheeled motor cart, and left standing for a few days, until all of the water dripped out or evaporated. Then I greased the lower jet unit and rolled it into the back of the basement, where the temperature never goes below 60*F.

    I get your point about the cost of maintenance versus the cost of repair, so I'm willing to fog the motor, if it will prevent ANY future problems. But, since it's a jet outboard, how would I move the pistons, while spraying the fogging oil in thru the spark plug holes?

    Thanx, Dave.

    PS - Thanx BRWNBR for starting such an timely thread. There's a lot of guys wondering this same thing.
    "Luckily, enforcement reads these forums, and likely will peruse this one...Especially after a link of it is forwarded to them....." - AlaskaHippie.

  10. #10
    Member breausaw's Avatar
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    I donít really do much of anything other than make sure themotor is setting upright and has been flushed good after the last use.
    That said, If your motor is carbonated defiantly drain the bowls.


    Gasoline in Alaska is methanol free so itís stable much longer than a winterís storage; I donít waste money on gas stabilizers.

    It makes more sense for me to change the oil in the spring, the inside of a motor can accumulate moisture from condensation throughout the winter so why have fresh motor oil exposed to this all winter long.

    I make sure the fuel tank or tanks are topped off to reduce the accumulation of moisture from condensation.
    In the spring I pour about 5 to 6 cans of SeaFoam in the fuel tank before the first trip.
    After the first trip then I do a full service on the outboard to include upper and lower oils, oil filter, high and low psi fuel filters, Racor filter, sparkplugs and any other motor consumable thatís required.

    Just how I do things, what makes sense after 40+ years of maintaining all my vehicles and toys.
    Jay
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  11. #11
    Member tzieli22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BluNosDav View Post
    Thanx Tony,

    Mine is a carburated 25hp 2-stroke Yamaha jet. I always use Stabil in my fuel/oil mixture, since I don't use this motor very often, and it doesn't burn that much fuel when I do. The last time that I used it, at the end of the trip, I disconnected the fuel line from the tank, and motored around the ramp area for a few minutes, until it ran out of gas, then rowed into shore. When I got home, it was hung vertically on it's wheeled motor cart, and left standing for a few days, until all of the water dripped out or evaporated. Then I greased the lower jet unit and rolled it into the back of the basement, where the temperature never goes below 60*F.

    I get your point about the cost of maintenance versus the cost of repair, so I'm willing to fog the motor, if it will prevent ANY future problems. But, since it's a jet outboard, how would I move the pistons, while spraying the fogging oil in thru the spark plug holes?

    Thanx, Dave.

    PS - Thanx BRWNBR for starting such an timely thread. There's a lot of guys wondering this same thing.

    Best thing to do is just spray into the pistons then work your flywheel around a few times just to coat the insides. Running the gas out is good too but some have had issues with gaskets drying out and then leaking a bit on its first use. For me my biggest thing is just throwing stabil in the gas. Maybe we don't need it anymore for the most part but to me its cheap insurance. It'll only take once when fuel in your engine goes bad or causes an issue. I had my issue about 15 years ago and a buddy of mine had an issue about 5 years ago. It does happen from time to time. And then the other big deal is water in your lower unit. (Or even better yet for us OB jet owners.). Water in your grease in the foot that freezes.). Make sure you Grease the heck out of your jet and the end of the season.

    Jay any I hear you as well. I am sure if we asked 50 folks how they do things we'd get 40 different ways on doing things.
    Tony

  12. #12

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    I would just change the oil and the lower gear lube. If you do it in the fall then you can detect any problems and have them fixed before spring rolls around.
    I have never fogged a 2 or 4 stroke motor and never used stabilizer. Never had any issues caused by not fogging or stabilizing. Whoever invented stabilizer is the grand daddy of snake oil patents.

  13. #13
    Member SockeyeOne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bkmail View Post
    Stabil in the gas, run it a bit to get it through the system.
    Fog it.
    Grease it.
    Keep it vertical so water does not gather in the prop and freeze.
    Quote Originally Posted by markopolo50 View Post
    I would certainly change the oil in the lower unit before winter. If any water got in there it could be trouble. I change mine every year. I treat the gas also but run my carbs out of gas on my Merc 75. Not sure about running out of gas if yours is fuel injected?
    Good advice from these guys here. ^^^^^^

    -Stabil in the fuel and run it to get it through the system
    -Grease all zirk fittings
    -Change the lower unit lube and make note of any water or metal in the old fluid
    -Store it with the trim all the way down on a stand or on the boat to make sure all water drains
    -Fogging is an older technique which is appropriate for carbbed engines, but can be difficult on modern injection engines unless you can somehow fill the fuel filter with fogging oil (Marvels works well).

    If you can't fog through the carb or fuel filter, pull the plugs and squirt some Marvels or similar in there. Not much, a teaspoon or so will do it. This will simulate the fogging proceedure, which is basically coating the piston heads and cylinder walls with a light coating of oil to prevent rust which can snag a ring and cause costly rebuild repairs.

    I just put my 5 (read 5 not 50 ) hp Yamaha away for the season. It took about 20 minutes to completely winterize it. Its a 1983 and it runs like a swiss watch. I don't doubt if you take care of your 50 the same way it will last you a very very long time.

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