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Thread: Ever melt raw Antimony?

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    Default Ever melt raw Antimony?

    I recently obtained Lead, Tin and Antimony all 99.9%pure. I havenít decided wither or not tomelt a mix for casting 45-70s or make it into linotype to and to range scrap. Eitherway I have never melted Antimony and would like to hear some dos & donítsabout the subject. The supplies I havefor melting alloys, are a cast Iron skillet, Cajun Cooker, and a Lee 4 20 pro seriesFurnas that tops out at 900 degrees. The more I know about the subject, the better. So donít hold back!

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    Great score on your metals. My reference says Antimony melts at 1166 degrees F. This is from an article by Jerry Gonicberg called ALLOYS FOR CAST BULLETS.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Lots of good info and additional references here; highly recommended!: http://www.lasc.us/Fryxell_Book_textonly2.pdf
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    I have never messed with Antimony but do melt a lot of lead.
    I highly recommend using a thermometer mounted to your melting pot. Also get a lead hardness tester and don't rely solely on your mixing percentages to get your alloy where you want it.
    Think safety first work in a well ventilated area and wear long sleeves and pants. Leather footwear and safety glasses. Welding gloves are nice also.
    I prefer the cast iron pots as a skillet may be too short to work properly with your ladle. For ladles I prefer the Rowell bottom pour ones from Rotometals.
    Keep any/all moisture away from your pot it is very dangerous to get any moisture in your pot even one drop.
    When melting scrap start from a cold pot so the moisture can burn off as it heats.
    I use beeswax to flux my lead but any wax should work even old candle scraps. After skimming all the dross off your pot put a small chunk about sugar cube size in your pot and stir it. It should auto ignite. If it doesn't then light it stirring the pot as the wax burns. More dross will come out and your lead will pour better.
    You can buy ingot molds or use an old muffin tin to pour your finished ingots in. Cool and store until you are ready to use them.
    If using a bottom pour pot make your ingots in your cast iron pot then put only clean fluxed ingots into your bottom pour pot.
    Watch the temp in your bottom pour pot as some of them can heat thing up to the levels where large amounts of hazardous fumes are generated.
    Generally you don't need your heat settings all the way up.
    I cast a lot of fishing jigs of all shapes and sizes so if you have lead casting questions feel free to ask me.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    Lots of good info and additional references here; highly recommended!: http://www.lasc.us/Fryxell_Book_textonly2.pdf
    Thanks for the book. That will come in handy this winter.

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    Kasiolfchrisn, Thanks for the tip. I'll be sure to let you know when I get stumped.

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    I'd say you've got some studying to do. Read, read, read before you start. There is an art/process to making your own alloy. Metallurgy.

    Heres another resource... http://www.theantimonyman.com

    and of course... http://castboolits.gunloads.com

    Here's a thread on the subject, one of many I'm sure.

    http://castboolits.gunloads.com/show...-melt-antimony

    You don't need or even want pure linotype boolits for a 45-70. Straight wheel weights air cooled or water dropped depending on your load. Pure with some tin may work as well depending.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    You can buy ingot molds or use an old muffin tin to pour your finished ingots in. Cool and store until you are ready to use them.
    Here's my handy casting tip to carry you through the years (and the accumulation of all sorts of alloys):

    Pick up all the various "ingot mods" you can. I have dedicated ingot molds from Lyman, RCBS and Saeco, in addition to muffin tins and those little corn-cob shaped pone pans.

    Howcum?

    Dedicate each of them for use with one of your standard alloys, as well as pure lead. That way you can tell at a glance which is which, even years later. My Lyman ingots are #2 alloy, while the Saeco are for linotype and the RCBS is for wheelweights. I got a bunch of lead from the backstop of the local indoor range, and that goes in regular muffin tins. The bigger corn pone ingot (I have 2 sizes) is for pure lead and the smaller is for an alloy I'm playing with at the moment.

    Simplest and best "labeling" system I know of.

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    Well it would apery I might be in over my head and I have afeeling this is going to be more trouble than itís worth, but Iím at least goingto give it a shot with a 10lb batch. 9lbs lead, 1 lb tin and 1lb antimony. If anybody wants to join me in my endeavor, IímPortage. Iíd like to say itíll be fun,but it will probably be like watching water boil, but longer.

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    Snyd, Thanks, Thatís was helpful. The linotypeis for adding to range scrap, which is appearing to be hard to get. I talked to the Range Manager at PottersMarsh yesterday (FAIL) and now that heís with OSHA, Itís not allowed. The lead is not considered hazardous until itspicked up, then they are held liable for it. Thereís 30 years of lead in thus banks. That would have been a jackpot 2 or 3 years ago. The search continues.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ASUS-DAG View Post
    Snyd, Thanks, Thatís was helpful. The linotypeis for adding to range scrap, which is appearing to be hard to get. I talked to the Range Manager at PottersMarsh yesterday (FAIL) and now that heís with OSHA, Itís not allowed. The lead is not considered hazardous until itspicked up, then they are held liable for it. Thereís 30 years of lead in thus banks. That would have been a jackpot 2 or 3 years ago. The search continues.
    Ya, I guess they figure if you dig it out of the ground you might eat it. That's the only way it's a hazard. Ridiculous. Hit your local tireshops this time of year. You might score a bucket-o-wheel weights or 2.

    Linotype to sweeten range scrap... I've never shot range scrap. I do have some ingots of mystery metal that I'll melt and load for 45 Colt plinkers some day. I do mix it with WW at times. 5/1 ww/lino for my 454 355gr. But mostly I just cast straight ww. I just got back from putting a 100 or so rounds of em downrange. I've got quite a bunch of stick on ww's that are pure lead. I'll mix that with lino someday.

    How long have you been casting?
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    I only have one ingot mold. I write on the ingot with a sharpie what the source was. We pick up spent bullets when we can. I always think the overall lead is on the soft side because I think the lead in jacketed bullets is not as hard as "hard cast lead bullets". It works fine for my lite loads.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Snyd View Post
    Ya, I guess they figure if you dig it out of the ground you might eat it. That's the only way it's a hazard. Ridiculous. Hit your local tireshops this time of year. You might score a bucket-o-wheel weights or 2.

    Linotype to sweeten range scrap... I've never shot range scrap. I do have some ingots of mystery metal that I'll melt and load for 45 Colt plinkers some day. I do mix it with WW at times. 5/1 ww/lino for my 454 355gr. But mostly I just cast straight ww. I just got back from putting a 100 or so rounds of em downrange. I've got quite a bunch of stick on ww's that are pure lead. I'll mix that with lino someday.

    How long have you been casting?
    Tryed a few tire shop to. They're treating them like there gold WW. How long have I been casting,,, lol (4 days) Like I said,, I think I'm in over my head. I'll probably hold off on the antimony for a bit. Seems like the smart thing to do for now. I should be getting my casts Monday. 375gr. sptizer 45-70 and 45ac 230 round nose. I've just been making ingots lately. I've got about 35lbs in ww, 55lbs in pure lead and about 20lbs in range scraps. That should me off for a bit.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ASUS-DAG View Post
    Tryed a few tire shop to. They're treating them like there gold WW.
    I probably shouldnít share this powerful tool on the web but BRIBES MAN! You need to grease up their good will via their taste buds. Iíve done lots of cold sales calls and if you just show up you donít get the time of day. BUT show up mid morning with a dozen cheap doughnuts or whatever . . . all the sudden you da man! They are happy to talk while they munch on some tasty treat.
     
    Show up at the shop with some quality junk food and a smile to thank them for their good job putting on your studs then, ďoh by the way you have any scrap lead?Ē You may still need to buy it but you'll leave there with something even if it's what they set back for another guy.
    Andy
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    Anything over about 2% tin is a waste of very expensive tin. Around 6% antimony should be plenty. Lead starts giving off bad things much over 1000 degrees so I'm not sure what the proper way to melt antimony into lead is. If you are wanting hard boolits, use straight wheel weights and drop them straight from the mold into a bucket of water and then wait a week or two for them to fully harden. For your 45/70 I would just melt all the lead you have, add 1 or 2% tin and water drop them if shooting them fast. Air cool them if shooting them slow. This cast thing isn't as difficult as some folks think and the 45/70 is not real picky about blend of lead. I started casting about 50 years ago when I was 17. You now have the internet that will answer any question you can think of. Good luck.

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    Pay attention to rbuck351. You've got some alloy, learn the basics and cast up some boolits!

    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    There is a fallacy of late that you need to have hard lead to shoot fast. The main reason that the larger boolit manufactures make their lead hard is because of fastness.....fastness of making the bullet cast fast - not shoot fast.

    The fact is that a hard lead will fill a mold better and be prettier on a multicast machine setup. This is what has started the hard cast lead following of late....marketing of hard lead.

    There have been many a long range blackpowder cartridge competition has been won with lead/tin bullets (the tin helps fill the mold better and more completely with less pickiness). No antimony. No wheel weights. No linotype.

    I have never melted antimony so I can't help there. Use your tin sparingly and your lead often and pour away. You'll get the hang of it. You can look at your bullet and see if she's purty!

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    Most long range black powder shoots are won with lead tin with fairly soft lead. Rarely are they won with a fast bullet as most of those guns will only shoot about 1400fps. When you start shooting fast lead bullets (2000fps+) you're going to need to either harden them some and shoot with gas checks or paper patch. Soft lead and speed = leading. Keep them down around 1500/1600 and soft lead will work.

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    For sure go to
    http://castboolits.gunloads.com/forum.php

    start an account, chat with the EXPERTS there..... They are just the best, and every question you may have has been asked, answered, and discussed... There is no better place to learn about the fun art of casting... I am a daily visitor there, and have been casting for years....

    here is a related site where you can find a Ton of resources about casting..

    http://www.castpics.net

    there are cali specific reads on many of the calibers that folks cast for. As well as out of print reloading manuals that have recipes for cast stuff not normally cast for....

    Casting adds a new dimension to reloading that got an old time reloader like me all excited about reloading again. And i will go ahead and say that casting makes you a better shooter, and your gun a better shooter... That ought to stir up a hornets nest..lol... But without proper bullet fit its all guess work. With casting, YOU decide the diameter of the bullet, not some automated machine. Once you go cast, nothing else will do. Give those links a shot.. You wont be sorry... If you have questions, pm me..

    mark from cordova
    also known as
    AlaskanGuy on castboolits
    I cast Custom Boolits. Want some? PM me.....

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    For me, 1400fps is fast - I only cast for my pistols. My FIL did send me up some gas checked 150gr rn .30 cals for my 1897 model 94 Winchester 30.30 that I am going to give a go. Not sure how fast I will push them yet. Probably won't use them for hunting but they should make nice plinkers and home defense boolitz! She holds 9 up the pipe and one in the barrel if I remember right...should make for some good john wayne action shooting!

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