Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Frigid Magnesium bodied binoculars?

  1. #1

    Default Frigid Magnesium bodied binoculars?

    I was just about to spring for some decent binos, but read recently that the magnesium bodied binoculars are very cold to the touch in colder temps, even with the rubber coatings. Makes sense since, as this would be a highly conductive material. Nothing worse than cold weather mechanicing. Yes, I know I can wear gloves, but then can you work the controls with those gloves?

    Unfortunately almost all the ones I'm interested in have a magnesium body (mid to higher end Pentax & Bushnell). So does that leave me with only polycarbonates or Zeiss' plastic (of which I can't afford)? Please report on your findings. Thanks

  2. #2
    Member jojomoose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    312

    Default

    I prefer to wear a sixteen dollar pair of insulated Atlas Solid Rubber Gloves. I would go with what you can see better with, you can always where gloves.

  3. #3
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,600

    Default

    Without a heat source everything at say zero degrees temp will also become zero degrees temp.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  4. #4
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,008

    Default

    Non-issue IMO. Always go with the best glass you can afford.

    If it's cold enough to threaten contact frostbite with your metal bodied bino's, wear gloves.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    Without a heat source everything at say zero degrees temp will also become zero degrees temp.
    Yes, this is true, but the rate of heat transfer to the epidermis is greater with metals. This is called the heat transfer coefficient (k) in thermal dynamics. The higher it is the higher the flow.

    Another way to look at that is would you be colder in 34 degree Farenheit air or the same temperature of water.

    Different heat transfer coefficients in Watts/meter/degrees Celsius at normal temps.:
    Air = 0.024
    Water = 0.58
    Aluminum = 237
    Magnesium = about 25% less than Aluminum
    PVC Plastic = 0.19

    I should probably stop there as I will be conversing above my educational limits.

  6. #6
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,008

    Default

    In the case of warm hands on cold metal heat is transferred FROM the warm skin TO the cold metal. It's stated here often, and incorrectly, that metal conducts the cold to your skin. Not true. Cold metal draws heat from your skin, and in in extreme cold does it fast enough to freeze warm skin on contact. Cold, per se, is a subjective euphemism that refers to the absence of heat. In this universe, heat ALWAYS transfers from the warmer thing to the colder thing until they reach thermal equilibrium.

    In the case of your conundrum over which binos to get, allow me to endorse the Nikon Monarch series. I have a pair of metal bodied, rubber armored 8x42's that have been used and mildly abused regularly since 2004. They're still clear, crisp and not too cold to the touch when it's cold. An awesome optics value in the $400 range.

    Let me also heartily endorse a pair of Lightweight Shooting Neo Full Finger glove by Glacier Glove. They are available at Sportsman's Warehouse. These nifty little gloves afford you a high degree of dexterity along with good to moderate protection against cold-soaked metal.

    I will be relying on both of these items while chasing deer on Montegue in a couple of weeks
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

  7. #7

    Default

    Why spend thousands of dollars on hunting, hunting gear and taxidermy bills and get economical binos? Great glass is an investment in your eyes, your chances, and your success. Plus, the resale value is strong if you ever get in a bind. Don't cheat yourself.

  8. #8
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,600

    Default

    For me I have bino's and a spoting scope I use to learn about critters. I have never taken a critter that I've looked at through bino's or spoting scope. I do see how they could save a lot of climbing if hunting goats and sheep though.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    For me I have bino's and a spoting scope I use to learn about critters. I have never taken a critter that I've looked at through bino's or spoting scope. I do see how they could save a lot of climbing if hunting goats and sheep though.
    This makes a great deal of sense for SE. I can honestly say I've never really needed them for deer hunting in this portion of the state, due to the thick forested region. Maybe spotting from a boat, late in the season, after a good snowfall, that brings the bucks down to the beach. I guess they would be more of a hindrance than a help. Thoughts from you SE deer hunters?

  10. #10
    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    PANC
    Posts
    1,117

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Erik in AK View Post
    In the case of warm hands on cold metal heat is transferred FROM the warm skin TO the cold metal. It's stated here often, and incorrectly, that metal conducts the cold to your skin. Not true. Cold metal draws heat from your skin, and in in extreme cold does it fast enough to freeze warm skin on contact. Cold, per se, is a subjective euphemism that refers to the absence of heat. In this universe, heat ALWAYS transfers from the warmer thing to the colder thing until they reach thermal equilibrium.

    In the case of your conundrum over which binos to get, allow me to endorse the Nikon Monarch series. I have a pair of metal bodied, rubber armored 8x42's that have been used and mildly abused regularly since 2004. They're still clear, crisp and not too cold to the touch when it's cold. An awesome optics value in the $400 range.

    Let me also heartily endorse a pair of Lightweight Shooting Neo Full Finger glove by Glacier Glove. They are available at Sportsman's Warehouse. These nifty little gloves afford you a high degree of dexterity along with good to moderate protection against cold-soaked metal.

    I will be relying on both of these items while chasing deer on Montegue in a couple of weeks
    What Erik in AK said. You are way over thinking this. Every pair of binoculars that you will buy for hunting will be rubber/plastic coated. You will not be touching metal. The rubber/plastic insulates your skin from the metal.

    I always plug these because they are a great value and sold by a forum sponsor:

    http://www.cameralandny.com/optics2/...age=steiner338

  11. #11
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    4,670

    Default

    Like Erik in AK I also use the Nikon Monarchs and have never had any issues with them making my hands or fingers cold. I use my binos all year long in every hunting condition known to man.

    Have to agree with GD Yankee you are WAY over thinking your optics purchase.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Wasilla, Ak
    Posts
    3,908

    Default

    When i buy a pair binos i ensure i can see through windows 300yds out at night while spying on the neighbor hood women.

  13. #13
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,600

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 323 View Post
    When i buy a pair binos i ensure i can see through windows 300yds out at night while spying on the neighbor hood women.
    Ever catch them looking back through their binos.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  14. #14
    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Beaver Fork
    Posts
    3,853

    Default

    ...Or a rifle scope....?
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

  15. #15
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,749

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GD Yankee View Post
    Every pair of binoculars that you will buy for hunting will be rubber/plastic coated. You will not be touching metal.
    Not hardly. You obviously don't know about ALL the binos that are out there......my Swaros are metal.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  16. #16
    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    PANC
    Posts
    1,117

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    Not hardly. You obviously don't know about ALL the binos that are out there......my Swaros are metal.
    Obviously I don't know about ALL. MOST decent binoculars are "armored" to prevent damage if dropped. My Swaros are rubber/plastic coated metal. I don't know how old yours are, but every one I've looked at over the past 5 years have been coated. I do have a pair of 1930s era Zeiss that are bare metal.

    Still, if it is cold enough to worry about transmissivity of heat in metals, it is cold enough to wear gloves of some sort. The problem with magnesium is that it usually is on the more expensive $$$ models. Oh, and magnesium will burn like hell in a fire if we want to keep the worry factor high.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •