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Thread: Transporting firearms in your canoe

  1. #1
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    Default Transporting firearms in your canoe

    Anyone have any nifty ideas for carrying your rifle in your canoe? I think there must be a better way out there!

  2. #2

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    Two ways I tend to do it, but depends somewhat on the situation.

    1.) hang a gun boot under the furthest back crossmemeber and keep the rifle there. Fairly easy to access and you can leave the butt end of the boot on to keep the water out if you want. Similar setup to how you might see one on a 4-wheeler.

    2.) If the boat is empty or you at least have some extra space in the rear compartment closest to you and nobody in the front of the boat, I will often use a bipod setup and just have it sitting on the bottom of the boat on the bipod. Doesn't work if there is someone sitting ahead of you in the boat for obvious reasons.

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    I would definitely make sure to keep your rifle in a hard case in the canoe. This spring/early summer I did a lot of canoeing and portaging with the rifle tied to my pack. The bashing it got knocked the scope off of aim, and also broke the seals, and I wound up buying a new scope.

    With the new scope, I now keep the rifle in a Kolpin gun boot meant for four wheelers and carry the cased rifle by hand over portages. Lashing the case to a cross member as described in the previous post would be handy. The case is not quite water proof, but with the addition of a very wide rubber band over the joint between the two case halves, it can withstand heavy multi-day rains and a lot of splashing. It would probably leak in a capsize, but if the case is tied off, at least you won't lose the rifle.

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    Member Tearbear's Avatar
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    There must be a floating hard case that is manufactured for use on and around the water.
    "Grin and Bear It"

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    the soft water proff case an tie it in , don't like hard cases, take up to much room in my rig . I have put some soft foam around it to to potect an also float abibility
    SID

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    Nomar makes a nice watertight floating case. It is just like a dry-bag so it is not a hard case.

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    I have two dry bag type cases with the roll tops for long term transport. Where I get stymied is when actually hunting to have them protected, out of the way and easily accessible. I can only get two of the three to work for me. Maybe the gun boot lashed under a thwart for quick action moose work is close to good enough.

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    Use it instead of a paddle,double duty so to speak.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    though a simple inquiry, I've personally had issues with how I store my rifle. I like it to be at the ready, so it's usually tied to a thwart, or my seat with a piece of rope and a quick-release knot. The rifle is always exposed to the elements as space is a major issue. The koplin style gunboots are insanely bulky/"one-size-fits-all" devices. The waterproof ones are a major hassle when trying to get a rifle ready for a shot. Slinging the rifle, is a major hazard (ask me how i know)

    One little string holding the gun in place is all I use, but man are my rifles taking a beating.

    I've been thinking quite heavily about custom sized/permanently mounted gun boots. For example: trace out your rifle, mail in the trace, get a waterproof gun boot that has a quick-flip device rendering the rifle for taking a shot as quickly as possible. Easily removable to keep your rifle near camp, but still rapidly deployed if needed.

    This year: I cracked the buttstock on my 22 magnum lever rifle. Had to jump out of the canoe heavily loaded with moose meat. There was a sweeper going completely across a fast chute in a braided section. my toe caught the recoil pad, cracking the buttstock at the tang.

  10. #10
    Member akdodger's Avatar
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    A friend of mine uses the foam coated twists used for various handyman purposes. They are like a large twist tie found on sandwhich bread loaf. They don't protect from the elements but the secure your rifle and make it very accessible.
    “The perils of duck hunting are great - especially for the duck.” Walter Cronkite

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    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    though a simple inquiry, I've personally had issues with how I store my rifle. I like it to be at the ready, so it's usually tied to a thwart, or my seat with a piece of rope and a quick-release knot. The rifle is always exposed to the elements as space is a major issue. The koplin style gunboots are insanely bulky/"one-size-fits-all" devices. The waterproof ones are a major hassle when trying to get a rifle ready for a shot. Slinging the rifle, is a major hazard (ask me how i know)

    One little string holding the gun in place is all I use, but man are my rifles taking a beating.

    I've been thinking quite heavily about custom sized/permanently mounted gun boots. For example: trace out your rifle, mail in the trace, get a waterproof gun boot that has a quick-flip device rendering the rifle for taking a shot as quickly as possible. Easily removable to keep your rifle near camp, but still rapidly deployed if needed.

    This year: I cracked the buttstock on my 22 magnum lever rifle. Had to jump out of the canoe heavily loaded with moose meat. There was a sweeper going completely across a fast chute in a braided section. my toe caught the recoil pad, cracking the buttstock at the tang.
    Ouch! My Rem 660 in 350 Rem Mag had some rust spots this year in it's caribou.moose, cotton case.. I felt like a criminal. You know I think maybe I'll make something along the lines you suggest. Sounds like a good winter project. I have some flexible birch plywood and epoxy cloth. A long slip cover might not be immersion-proof but it would be splash and rain proof. Some closed cell foam glued inside would take up little room and help keep the rifled zeroed. I agree the gunboot is way big and bulky and even in a freighter you need to be a minimalist.

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    This doesn't solve the problem, but I carry 2 rifles, one 16" Rossi 92 stainless in 44 mag with a peep in a padded pack scabbard tied to the seat I'm in and the other is scoped in a waterproof alum case tied somewhere near by. I figure the short range gun will do for 100 yds or so and the longer shots can be taken in reasonable time with the other rifle. The 92 is about a quick to draw as a handgun, easier to shoot accurately and packs more punch. If it's raining I can pull it up next to me under a poncho and it's as dry as I am.

    I reworked the 92's (also have one in .45 LC with Duracoat) and they are as smooth as the old Win 92 after they are broken in properly and will shoot heart sized groups at 100 yds with 265 gr Keith hard cast. They won't feed longer rounds with say 320 gr.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

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    Ahh the Rossi. I have a reworked ranch hand in 44 Mag I put a full stock on. The 12" barrel is very handy and it sits just about anywhere. It shoots pretty well with 300 grain Sierras and I sometimes bring it for the same reason. How did you re-work yours. Mine is slowly smoothing up but can be induced to jam when cycled slowly.

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    AS you can see there are a lot of ways to carry your guns , but a couple of things are standard , Dry, tied to your canoe , in some typr of case ,
    also close by just in case you get a shot at something close , after you stop your movement , don't break the law , as I see it ,
    SID

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sid View Post
    AS you can see there are a lot of ways to carry your guns , but a couple of things are standard , Dry, tied to your canoe , in some typr of case ,
    close by just in case you get a shot at something after you stop your movement , don't want to break the law about shooting from a moving boat
    SID
    Oh, you can shoot from a moving boat, just not one moving because of a motor. Paddling is just fine.

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    your are correct I did not explane my self well , just be carfull there can be a thin line of movement from water & motor I need to stop
    [ bad shot , need all the help I can get ] SID

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    http://drybags.com/product/FGW-GUN.html

    Best dry bag that I've found so far...

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    Default I use kolpin

    I have to admit to being part of the Kolpin hard boot (yes, made for an ATV) in a canoe crowd. And yes it sure is bulky. Also the boot can be noisy if you're not thinkin' enough to remove the boot first when you're in your territory and in season. Don't ask me how I know.

    I'm even thinking about mounting the base mount that you'd usually bolt to the ATV, yes, directly to my canoe. It would save me tying a lanyard on it like all loose gear, plus keep it in the perfect grab-able position. (I would think; haven't tried.)

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    North,

    I just used 320 grit grinding compound and a Scotch Brite wheel to make all the tooling marks...well most of them go away. Then I ran hot water on the parts until they felt clean and dried them all with a hot air gun...followed by the usual grease/oil treatment. The stainless one was harder than the blued steel to get smooth. I think due to the nature of SS and maybe a rougher finish to start with. Worth the effort IMHO.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

  20. #20

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    My backup stainless 45/70 collected a bit of rust on this years float hunt. I wiped it everyday with oil but it still rusted even with a special fancy rifle dry bag. Wild West told me the best protection is to warm the rifle over the tent stove or campfire to dry it out when possible and spray it good with a can of Rem oil. I'll try that next time. My bows don't rust but they are problematic when strung and traveling in a canoe. I use foam pipe insulation wrapped over the gunnels, rest the bow on the foam and tie it down with a foam covered wire tie. I'd do about the same if traveling with a rifle as primary except I might snap the foam pipe insulation over the barrel and rest the but in the canoe and still use the foam wire ties. They work great for fishing rods too. A black contractor trash bag and rubber bands cut from a wheel barrow inner tube make an inexpensive rain cover. It's cheaper than an expensive special fancy rifle dry bag and will probably protect it just as well.

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