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Thread: Distances involved in the Hunter Ed. Field day shoot?

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    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    Default Distances involved in the Hunter Ed. Field day shoot?

    Got my field day test coming up. Don't know if it makes any difference, but I took the online course.

    What distances are involved? I read all the F&G verbiage, but still not sure how far I have to set my farthest pin.

    Thanks.

  2. #2

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    If you are referring to the bow hunting certification, I think they max out at 30 yards, at least that is how it was when I took the class. Standing and kneeling, various distances and an elevated (bear stand type) shot. Bring a range finder if you intend to use one when hunting since they will not tell you the distances, just stop you somewhere, point out the target and you take the shot. It's been a while since I took the test, so it may have changed since then. There are at least a couple instructors on here that could help as well.

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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    If I remember right, you won't have anything over 35 yds. You can miss two, but not both on the same target.

    Good luck!
    AKmud
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    Here is a link to the description of the field test: http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...ered.fdbowreqs

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    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by anchskier View Post
    Here is a link to the description of the field test: http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...ered.fdbowreqs
    Right. Read through that several times. Can't find any max distances listed.

    I've got a 20 and 30 yard pins set, but not further at the moment. I wouldn't expect a shot past 35 yards, but I don't want to be surprised.

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    I am an IBEP instructor, let me clear some things up for you; Yes you may use a rangefinder, you MAY NOT share distances with other participants, you MAY NOT share your rangefinder with other participants. You will have one elevated shot to simulate a downhill or treestand shot. It will be relatively close. You will have 4-5 more targets at different ranges on animals like a goat, a few deer, a caribou, and a Dall sheep. Depending on what part of the state you take your course in will depend on your farthest shot. In Fairbanks we try not to pass the 30 yard marker, but in the Mat-Su valley we have done 36 before. You may or may not encounter different shot angles as well, you may have all broadside shots, and you may have a mixture of broadside and quartering away shots. You may also encounter a few shots with wide open shooting lanes, and you may encounter shooting lanes with some low brush or in tight quarters with trees and vegetation. If you have any questions just PM me.

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    oh and one more thing, you will take two shots per target, one standing and one kneeling. So practice kneeling.

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    Took mine in Palmer a few years ago. The longest shot was 28 yards.

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    Default instructor-discretion

    The instructor has a fair amount of leeway in setting things up, and for that matter, in how to conduct class as well. That's probably the reason that you're not getting exact answers.

    Its always good to be the boy scout (friendly, helpful and kind) during the class and tests; if there is a judgment call regarding whether one of your shots is a hit or a miss there isn't a vote on the subject. Instead the only vote is cast by the instructor, so its good to get along with them.

    There are no instructors that enjoy failing a student, and indeed most have not done so. But they can anytime, and for just about any reason too. I think you'll find that if you're the boy scout to them, they'll give you every chance in the world to pass the test, sometimes even involving an extra try at a target. Do not quote me on this last part since it is entirely possible for an instructor to not give any leeway whatsoever, and if you've been a distracting class-clown the whole time, your actions could have easily influenced your final class grade, and not in a good way.

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    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKRecurveAssassin View Post
    oh and one more thing, you will take two shots per target, one standing and one kneeling. So practice kneeling.
    Thank you very much for the information. I'm not worried about it, but I have only one shot at it this fall before the permit applications in December and I want to get it right.

  11. #11

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    ARA, where's the consistency in that?!?!?! I used to teach up here (fbks), no shots were farther than 30 and don't believe this has changed. Farthest shot was at an elk. one bear out of a stand, 2 more deer sized targets and a blood trail rounded out the course. If you read the online curriculum it fully states 8 shots at 4 3d targets, 5 kills 1 kill per target.

    You can be the biggest pain in my rear end and if you pass you passed...if you failed you failed. The difference than was we took people under our wings, got things straightened out so the next time they shot, they were a go. If you were a thorn in my tail, I wouldn't waste my time helping you. If you had a general desire to be a bowhunter, one of us would sit down and check things out usually, or point you in the right direction if we were up to our ears in shooters.

    The instructors do not have leeway in the shoot! or atleast did not! Atleast up here there is no leeway or was no leeway. You passed or failed. The kill zone had some play, being the lines represent nothing at all other than a score for shoots. Lay the arrow on the top of the target and you'll get an idea of how I would deal with shots.

    I stopped teaching when it went to online class's. I've gotten to a point the hole thing needs reworked imho. but that will never happen!

    The inconsistencies in this class were atleast at one time really bad....one area shooting bh's one area shooting fps,4 targets 5 targets, no consistency in distances, blah blah blah....There was only one kneeling target, it was your discretion. They had a meeting up here with the big wigs...4 of us attended, minus Bob and Jerry, Del and Andy were there along with myself and an oldtimer I recognize but cant put a name too. NO OTHER instructors showed to try and get things on par around the state.

    The class is simple and if you can shoot 3d's you'll be fine. Its not ment to fail, but don't show up like many do with tags hanging on bows, borrowing gear, or just flat out trying to shoot the feed store (before the range moved lol). The crap you see on the shoot days is hideous. I'm sure you'll do fine. I cant tell you how many tiems I'd see someone show up with tags hanging, arrows in the cardboard cutouts from target (showing my years ha), and flat out telling us this was their first time shooting! That's only the beginning.

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    If you are here in Anchorage go to Rabbit Creek and do the walk through 3-D range standing and kneeling. It's not the same course but will let you know what you will be shooting. For $9 you can shoot all day and have your bow set. When I did mine in the 90's I already had 10 years of archery behind me. We had Jack Frost as my instructor. I sat through the field day class again 2 years ago with my wife and son. I agree with TradBow, it should not be an online course. The value of the discussions that students have is immeasurable. I still remember Jack Frost opening his pack tool kit. Because of him I added a portable press and a set of strings to my kit. Sure enough on my first outing in AK I cut a string in the “bow case”. Wish the discussions would have included broad head tipped arrows in a Plano bow case with the bow can bounce around. Still got my first grouse on that trip, because of what I learned in the class.

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    The focus of why this needs passed is getting somewhat muddled. Passing this shows that you are marginally prepared to get the privelege of hunting with a bow for a living animal.....not that you can now apply for a potentially higher odds drawing. If this is why you are into it, get out.

    There is nothing within this test that is beyond what a person who is truly ready to hunt with a bow should be able to do. Practice shooting up to at least 30 yards, do some blind estimation of yardages so you can start being practiced at real hunting situations.

    I won't get too far into it, but if you have a range finder.....you have nothing to fear (if they should be allowed at all...there, I said it). They won't give you an impossible or unethical shot. Practice like you respect the game you are going to chase, and go pass the test.

    I was an accomplished bowhunter when i took the course three years ago, with many years of league shooting and general archery fun. To sit and watch guys shaking because they were afraid that someone was going to see them miss made me realize something was wrong with the mentality on the line.... guess what....IT HAPPENS. I've watched my friends who have won multiple archery shoots launch one into the woods, never to be found again. Missing is part of archery, learn from it. I did my best to encourage those guys and get them focused.

    What you should be nervous about is going hunting without being properly trained, practiced, equipped and mentally ready to hunt and kill with a bow. Mistakes happen, but to go into something like bowhunting with a devil may care attitude will do nothing for you or the sport.

    Likely within your class there will be a few folks like me (I had more arrows loosed in my life than half of my four instructors........but less than the others, all great guys) who are just getting certified because it's a good idea. Those guys will be obvious on hte line, and will help you as much as the instructors will. Everyone wants to see you pass, the instructor, your classmates, hell, even me. Just like anything else in life that's worth doing. Don't cut corners, don't try to cheat, don't be a heel,.....DO practice, DO practice, then DO practice some more. I have found archers to be some of the most helpful and connected outdoorsmen I have met, if you are having trouble, find someone to help you out, BEFORE the test.

    Good luck (but practice enough that you don't need it)

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    trad bow.... consistency??? *** are you even talking about?

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    and my god, will someone please provide me with a valid argument to why we shouldn't have an online class? oh and btw, jsut so you are clear, the field day for the online class is not just shooting and blood trailing. we sit in the class and discuss what you went over in your online course. you both seem pretty out of the loop gentlemen.

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    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKRecurveAssassin View Post
    and my god, will someone please provide me with a valid argument to why we shouldn't have an online class? oh and btw, jsut so you are clear, the field day for the online class is not just shooting and blood trailing. we sit in the class and discuss what you went over in your online course. you both seem pretty out of the loop gentlemen.
    The online course works for me. I've been hunting with a bow since the 80's and have always taken ethical (and lethal) shots. I don't need the full course. If I had all the time in the world, I'm sure the review would be enjoyable. But I really don't, so I am appreciative that the shorter course exists.

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    Default online course, and its in-person field day

    Whether good or bad, the online courses are here to stay for many many reasons. Of course its fair game to express one's opinion on it, but don't anyone be confused about the result of such discussions, since that point is definitely (imo) moot.

    About the structure/content of what is covered in person on the field day to complete the online course, I was and still am strongly in favor of the written test being part of that field day so that the test is proctored. But my opinion was vastly outnumbered by those that felt that the written test being on the honor system was good enough, and instead that hour be devoted to instruction instead of testing, so that's the way it is today. Its quite probable that that point is moot today as well.

    On the subject of different online course field days not being consistent from instructor to instructor, I have not seen a large problem in this regard. Instructors are human, and our human instructors are today encouraged to bring their own experience to the situation, so differences between classes are in that regard are intentional. To my knowledge no one has ever proposed that the in person portions of today's hunter safety classes be as consistent as the McDonalds menu is from restaurant to restaurant. If there is an issue of problems being introduced due to instructor-differences, I for one sure would like to hear more about what that problem is.

    So far as the in person shoot yardages being different from class to class, its unrealistic to think that all field shoots can be even close to identical. They're conducted within guidelines so far as yardages, blockages to the shooting lane, the terrain itself, what an elevated shooting position looks like, and such, and of course the setups are slightly different. Again, this is due to not only the differences between the terrain involved with each site that is used but also the personal touch (of the instructors) is encouraged within guidelines, and I for one sure don't see that as a bad thing.

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    Thank you familyman for clearing that up and providing valid arguments.

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    Hmm, thought I replied to this a few days ago but I guess it didn't take. The only thing I will add is to be aware of small bushes and branches. It doesn't take much to nudge an arrow off target, and I missed a kill shot during my test because I nicked a bush. After I shot it was swaying back and forth like it was wagging a scolding finger at me. :-)

  20. #20

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    The op question was regarding the shoot. Not whether or not there's a classroom session before hand.

    As instructors we have some leeway. But the shoot was fixed to be consistent acrossed the state. Ie 4 targets 2 arrows per, no shots past 30 with 5 kills.

    Not one elevated with 4-5 more targets. There needs to be consistency across the state! Understanding not all ranges are exactly the same, some target distances maybe off a yard or two but even this was 'fixed ' as well! At one point it was a mess! But if you read my post you'll glean those earlier errors (based on leeway!)

    That's what I'm talking about when I referenced consistency .

    I think this course (along with the muzzleloader course) needs a major overhaul! It always beefs me when someone starts the class with. "Welcome to bowhunter ed, we are not here to teach you to be bowhunters ....."

    Which takes me into the online classes. There's too much hands on that can be taught and should be in a "education class" that's left out.

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