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Thread: New gun question.

  1. #1
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    Default New gun question.

    Say you had $850 to put into a new rifle. What would it be? Keeping, accuracy, and ammo availablity in mind. The gun would not need to be a moose or bear gun (I already have those), I'm thinking something with less recoil and really easy to shoot. Something for bou sized animals and smaller. Not a .270 either I already have one of those as well. Feel free to make suggestions and be sure to tell why. Support your opinion with pics too if need be. This should be fun.

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    Tikka T3 in .243. Under $850, accurate, light yet low recoil, stainless, and ammo relatively available.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    You can get a AR now for that money easy to shoot and who knows what the future will bring.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Finnish M-39 Mosin Nagant, in excellent shape and a couple crates of milsurp russian 188 factory 7.62X54r and a couplea crates of the Sellor and Bellot non corrosive..........

    Shoot shoot shoot, till I was profecient and then a huntin' I would go.

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    If I did not already have one, it would be a 243 win. Make of rifle (?) with the $850 constraint, I would look at something in the Savage line. They do not cost much and they tend to shoot very well. But being that I am a Winchester rifle person, I would be looking for and older M70. I have taken varmints, caribou, black bear and moose with a 243. While it may not be the first choice, it well get the job done. The 243 is fun to shoot, easy to reload for and has a good choice of ammo.

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    A 54. or 58. caliber muzzle loader. Since you already have the firearms required for all the animals in AK. I would consider the addition of a rifle that would increase my time afield and allowed me the access to hunting areas closed to normal firearms. With muzzle loaders you have the option of loading them down and hunting rabbits or stoking them up and hunting moose. The same could be said of a bow it allows you to hunt the worlds largest archery only hunting area, the Dalton Hwy area. Either of these purchases should leave you with enough change to buy the wife a new 22 lr (rifle or pistol).
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    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    I think I am looking at this question a little different from others. I would first look a bullet specs, and make a decision first based on caliber. There are a number of wildcats in the .2xx calibers, but the .243 is extremely popular, so I would lean that way. My personal choice in the .3xx would be the .308 or 30/06 because these bullets are available everywhere and you can go with a very light weight round with almost no kick to a very heavy round to take a moose down. Once I chose a caliber, then I start looking at different models, and make a choice that way. Looking on-line, at Gun shows, pawn shops and dealers...look everywhere and chances are you will find exactly what you want to find :-) Lots to choose from in this price range!
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    Questions similar to this have been asked a bazillion times on the Shooting Forum (it's kind of like asking on this forum, what is the best bear gun?), so you could search the archives over there and get additional ideas.

    You didn't say how much you shoot, if you handload, is rifle weight a factor, etc... Therefore, a generic answer is find something chambered in 7-08. You'll have a MUCH greater selection of bullet weights than what you'll find for the 243...especially if you handload.

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    6.5 my favorite caliber with a bullet that wont quit flying. 130 or 140 gr accubonds @ 3300 or 3200 fps respectively. Surely you can find a doner action and canibalize. Bartlein barrel at $375 and any trigger you can stand. Down side is you have to reload, i think. Lots of component availability. Comparatively speaking.

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    Since you have a moose and bear rifle and the king of open country deer rifles (a .270) what more could you possibly need?

    A .243 or .22-250 could make a nice varmint gun or perhaps something like a 17 or 22 Hornet for fur.

    It's a completely subjective question since you've got your required bases pretty well covered. You don't mention a lever gun but a nice peep sighted 30-30 is something everyone should have.
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    http://www.savagearms.com/firearms/model/16FCSS

    My preference would be .260 Rem but 7mm-08 would be good too and improve factory ammo choices. The ammo wouldn't be crazy cheap like commie or NATO calibers but you should be able to get good hunting rounds for about $25 a box if you avoid the premium stuff. This same gun is also available with a hinged floor plate but I much prefer the detachable magazine myself. I'd buy a couple extra magazines, and might even carry two with me while hunting. With an MSRP of $850 you should be able to procure one for around $700 if you price shop.

    Not a pretty gun if that turns your crank. Very accurate and functional though.

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    I bought a cheap, lightweight, low recoil gun this year. I chose the savage axis youth 7-08. All my ammo has been hand loaded by local guys in 110 to 140 grain bullets. The 110's I had loaded up for my kid, who barely weighs over 50 pounds and he was ok with the recoil. The gun only weighs 6 and 1/2 pounds before you add everything to it. I picked it up for $280 at three bears. We never got a chance to tip over a caribou, but it killed a little black bear at 90 yards with one round.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sambuck12 View Post
    Say you had $850 to put into a new rifle. What would it be? Keeping, accuracy, and ammo availablity in mind. The gun would not need to be a moose or bear gun (I already have those), I'm thinking something with less recoil and really easy to shoot. Something for bou sized animals and smaller. Not a .270 either I already have one of those as well. Feel free to make suggestions and be sure to tell why. Support your opinion with pics too if need be. This should be fun.
    Think predators to get you out and about during those long winters up there. Personally I've always wanted a real nice 22 mag.....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    When you say $850.00 for rifle do you really mean rifle+scope+ammo+sling+tax = $850.00 rifle?
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Member shimano 33's Avatar
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    7mm-08. Bou despise it..

    20130827_135024.jpg

    IMG_1209.jpg

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    I'm in a similar boat so here's what I did. I went with the 7mm-08. Not once, twice or three times but four times. I know, I know, I bought a Browning A bolt medallion with great wood and a 24 inch barrel, a Winchester model 70 Featherweight and bought a grade 3 stock for it from CDNN for around $100.00, bought a Remington 700 SPS and fitted it with a McMillan Remington Classic stock and most recently, a Tikka T3 Lite Stainless and just recently ordered a laminated stock for it. All four rifles were under your $850.00 ceiling assuming that price does not include scope, rings and bases or upgraded stocks.

    I chose the 7mm-08 because of the bullet diameter and I should be able to hunt everything I'd like including calling predators with 120-140 grain bullets. I used to hunt deer with a 243 many years ago while stationed in Montana but I just didn't like the results I got on game with handloaded 100 grain Nosler partitions. I prefer larger bullet diameters pushed at moderate speeds rather than narrow diameter bullets pushed at light speed. I also figure these rifles will make great deer and pig rifles in the lower 48 when I finally retire and spend the winters further south. The recoil in these rifles is also a bit kinder for those women and youngsters who don't like to get kicked.

    It's not my first choice for moose, browns or black bears but it's plenty for everything else.

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    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    I just came across that yesterday. Hilarious.

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    Member shimano 33's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sep View Post
    I'm in a similar boat so here's what I did. I went with the 7mm-08. Not once, twice or three times but four times. I know, I know, I bought a Browning A bolt medallion with great wood and a 24 inch barrel, a Winchester model 70 Featherweight and bought a grade 3 stock for it from CDNN for around $100.00, bought a Remington 700 SPS and fitted it with a McMillan Remington Classic stock and most recently, a Tikka T3 Lite Stainless and just recently ordered a laminated stock for it. All four rifles were under your $850.00 ceiling assuming that price does not include scope, rings and bases or upgraded stocks.

    I chose the 7mm-08 because of the bullet diameter and I should be able to hunt everything I'd like including calling predators with 120-140 grain bullets. I used to hunt deer with a 243 many years ago while stationed in Montana but I just didn't like the results I got on game with handloaded 100 grain Nosler partitions. I prefer larger bullet diameters pushed at moderate speeds rather than narrow diameter bullets pushed at light speed. I also figure these rifles will make great deer and pig rifles in the lower 48 when I finally retire and spend the winters further south. The recoil in these rifles is also a bit kinder for those women and youngsters who don't like to get kicked.

    It's not my first choice for moose, browns or black bears but it's plenty for everything else.
    agree with the recoil being very friendly for young/new/female hunters..

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