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Thread: Interesting Article about Toxoplasma Gondii in Moose Meat

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    Default Interesting Article about Toxoplasma Gondii in Moose Meat

    If you didn't see the article, thought people might be interested in checking it out. Interesting information regarding potential toxoplasma gondii in moose meat that can get humans sick if not cooked thoroughly. I usually consider game meat to be "safe" and am not nearly as concerned with fully cooking it as I am with other storebought meats. I might want to reconsider a bit after reading this. Although not apparently a life or death type thing for adults, still not a fun thing to deal with.

    http://www.adn.com/2013/10/10/311921...dercooked.html

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    Indeed. I wasn't aware of that possible connection. Thanks much for the info and link.

    larry

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Toxoplasmosis is considered to be a leading cause of death attributed to foodborne illness in the United States. More than 60 million men, women, and children in the U.S. carry the Toxoplasma parasite, but very few have symptoms because the immune system usually keeps the parasite from causing illness. However, women newly infected with Toxoplasma during pregnancy and anyone with a compromised immune system should be aware that toxoplasmosis can have severe consequences. http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/toxoplasmosis/
    ADf&G has a very educational page on the parasites and diseases common to animals in Alaska. Everybody who hunts or fishes should bone up on this stuff before they chow down on it.
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    Member scott_rn's Avatar
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    I've met with Dr. Isada (from the article) a couple of times due to some pregnancy complications. You really just need to get meat to 165 degrees - and not just moose.
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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by anchskier View Post
    I usually consider game meat to be "safe" and am not nearly as concerned with fully cooking it as I am with other storebought meats.
    I'm with you there. I can't stand overcooking good meat. And moose meat is the one meat that I really always enjoyed leaving a little pink.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by anchskier View Post
    I usually consider game meat to be "safe" and am not nearly as concerned with fully cooking it as I am with other storebought meats.
    I'm with you there. I can't stand overcooking good meat. And moose meat is the one meat that I really always enjoyed leaving a little pink.
    That's exactly the kind of thing the woman in the OP's linked news story said, right up until it made her sick and nearly killed her unborn child:
    the family ate the steaks medium-rare, like they always do. She was 26 weeks pregnant. She said she never considered it unsafe to eat moose meat, because it was organic.
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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    That's exactly the kind of thing the woman in the OP's linked news story said, right up until it made her sick and nearly killed her unborn child:
    I know...........I read the article....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Yep, risk exists, but I'd wager that it is mathematically lower than the risk of e. coli from store-bought spinach, salmonella from chicken, etc. Proper food-handling techniques should be used, but based on the rarity of this particular infection, I'll take my chances with some pink in my moose, caribou, and sheep meat. I'll keep cooking lynx and bear to a high enough temps, but moose should have a bit of pink to it. If my wife were pregnant, I would go about it differently.

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    If my wife were pregnant, I would go about it differently.
    Indeed. But then again, not knowing about Toxoplasma Gondii my wife ate pink moose meat carrying both of our kids and never had a problem. I'd have to wonder what the percentage is of moose carrying the bug?
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Member tod osier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Yep, risk exists, but I'd wager that it is mathematically lower than the risk of e. coli from store-bought spinach, salmonella from chicken, etc. Proper food-handling techniques should be used, but based on the rarity of this particular infection, I'll take my chances with some pink in my moose, caribou, and sheep meat. I'll keep cooking lynx and bear to a high enough temps, but moose should have a bit of pink to it. If my wife were pregnant, I would go about it differently.
    It appears that freezing takes care of it, so moose from the deep freeze should be able to be eaten pink:

    http://www.foodsafety.gov/poisoning/...sis/index.html

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tod osier View Post
    It appears that freezing takes care of it, so moose from the deep freeze should be able to be eaten pink:

    http://www.foodsafety.gov/poisoning/...sis/index.html
    Well that's good to know.....thanks!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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