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Thread: drahthaar owners

  1. #1
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    Default drahthaar owners

    Looking at getting a drahthaar. Was curious who everyone went through, their experiences, costs etc. Not planning on getting one soon probably at least a two year time frame. Any recommended reading, things to think about. This will be my first hunting dog I have had dogs all my life but they have all been house pets. My current is a German Shepard/sled dog mix that is turning 10 this year.

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    Drahthaar's are awesome dogs. I've owned two WHP and I'm on my second Drahthaar (in the last 34 years).... The Drahthaar is a Better hunter than the WHP. Easier to train, more instinctive in the hunting skills. I was very happy with the WHP breed also though. Downside is they are expensive. They are getting to be a little more available. Breeders are online with most the info you need. But shipping by air is very expensive. I was hunting with a 5 month old pup today and was very impressed with his progress. He found birds that went down in the long grass. Also ran down and captured a crippled Sharptail. Good to be hunting with a Drahthaar again.....

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    Be careful what and where you buy. I bought a wirehair puppy 30 years ago. She was always sharp around people, a fear biter, and she never did swim voluntarily. That's probably why I have labs today.

    I would find out about the temperaments and hunting ability of both the sire and dam of the litter you are considering. I would insist on talking with clients of the breeder to find out the temperament and natural abilities of the line of dogs they sell and make sure my pup was from the same lines as the dogs I inquired about. Even then there are no guarantees.

    My Drathaar/wirehair (Still am not sure of the difference as the terms were somewhat interchangeable way back when) was not all bad. She was very birdy, liked to retrieve, and very devoted to me, if no one else. She was kind of a creeper on point but not excessive. I swear she had a sense of humor.

    One big memory of her was on a river, while I was sighting in my 300 mag before hunting season. I put her on a sit stay behind me and concentrated on my rifle and scope. After a few shots I looked through my scope in horror as I saw my dog downrange checking out where I was shooting. She could stay sitting for 2 or 3 shots but after the 5 or 6 I had shot she just knew something out there needed to be checked out and retrieved. That ended my sighting in that day as I was somewhat shaken.

    You should have seen her when I shot my first caribou with her along. It was a long shot and she hadn't seen the boos. I walked out to it, with her all excited because of the shot, out front. She got downwind of the downed boo. She didn't get birdy but stalked to the new scent cautiously. She was really pretty tentative when she saw it, half circling it slowly, sniffing and looking. At about 2 feet from it she suddenly jumped it, grabbed an ear and started shaking and pulling. I was laughing pretty hard.

    Tom Rothe should be in the Eagle River phone book. He and Ann have had Drathaars for a long time and should be able to give you good advice on breeders.

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    Read about the Drahthaar breed. http://www.vdd-gna.org/

    These are not the same as the AKC Wiredhaired Pointer. The Drahthaar has much stricter breeding standards. The dog has to prove its hunting abilities through testing, before it can be bred. Big dif between the Drahthaar and the GWP....

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    Pipercub, could you say something about their coats too. My Wirehair had a fuzzyish coat. It would soak up when wet and collected snowballs that grew pretty big in size in the right conditions. This was mostly in her armpits, back of the legs, behind the ears, and her feet. Her feet would get snowballs which turned to ice and sandpapered her pads. Her feet could get very sore, red, and raw from this. She was pretty miserable sometimes in snow. That, plus I could never trust her around people are the deal breakers for me on ever getting another one.

    For as fuzzy as she was, her coat was very thin.

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    the drahthaar and the wirehair have similar coats. The coats can be as thick as the griffon or as thin as the shorthair. you need to look at the parents to decide if it is the right density. all of the above dogs have webbed feet for swimming. webbed feet collect iceballs and the dogs learn how to chew them out. I skijor with my dogs all winter long. the worst snow is the wetter kind. we have dry snow most of the winter. i hunt birds in the winter and these dogs can run all day long. they are an amazing breed, their endurance is incredible....they can handle the cold.

  7. #7
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    The only Drats I knew were Jenny Horstman's, when she lived up here. Her dogs were very pleasant and well trained. The best story I have of Jenny's dogs is the time she showed me how her female would track a trail to a downed animal, then flip a tab hanging on her collar into her mouth and go back to get Jenny...Holding the tab meant she had found something and wanted Jenny to follow her...

    I always thought it would fun to have one, if I ever decided to go to a pointing dog... One good thing about the Drat is that if you buy a pup registered as such (the german/european breed) you know the parents have had to go through a literal smorgasbord - no pun iintended, lol - of testing in order to be bred...and the breeders keep SUPER records of their breedings...
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