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Thread: Moose rib recipes

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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    Default Moose rib recipes

    My recent good fortune this past hunting season has landed a pile of moose ribs in the freezer.
    We cut most of these into short ribs.

    Sure would appreciate some favorite "moose rib" recipes......!
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
    TR

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Default Moose ribs

    Marinate in a terriyaki sauce overnight. Grill on high heat.
    Delicious. Hope you left the fat on them, it's good stuff.
    BK

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Don't EVER cook ribs fast (boiling or raw on the grill), it'll make em tough; best way is to cook in a pressure smoker, then finish on a grill....next best is slow, moist heat (oven, crockpot, etc.). I've got some moose shortribs in the freezer; plan to cook em up kalbi style this winter.
    "– Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Akgramps View Post
    My recent good fortune this past hunting season has landed a pile of moose ribs in the freezer.
    We cut most of these into short ribs.

    Sure would appreciate some favorite "moose rib" recipes......!
    We've always cooked our ribs in a crock pot.. preferably one that gives you a 4, 6, 8 or 10 hour setting.. I like the 8 hr setting.
    on top of the ribs, dump in 2 pkgs of Sloppy Joe mix, 1 can diced tomatoes, an onion chopped in small pieces, a little brown sugar
    and less than a cup of water.. set the timer on 8 hrs and go outside and stay all day... otherwise the aroma really gets to you.!

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    Member chano's Avatar
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    My Favorite Meal

    -Cut Moose ribs individually in pieces that are just right for picking up and chewing on (Make sure you leave all fat on)

    -Generously coat each rib in Soy Sauce, Worchestershire, and Montreal Steak Seasoning, refrigerate over night.

    -Using a digital type smoker (Bradley,Masterbuilt, ect...) close off all air flow and smoke at 210 degrees for 4-5 hours. Pack as many ribs as you can in and make sure you have water in the pan.

    -1/2 hour before ribs are done generously coat with Sweet Baby Rays.

    At this point you can eat till you explode. If the ribs were never frozen they will be much more tender. If you want the meat to completely fall off the bone tender add a few cups of water to a turkey roaster take the ribs out of the smoker and cook them at 210 for 4 more hours in your oven. If you need help eating them call me.

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Can I get a side of baked beans and tater salad with that?
    "– Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old John View Post
    We've always cooked our ribs in a crock pot.. preferably one that gives you a 4, 6, 8 or 10 hour setting.. I like the 8 hr setting.
    on top of the ribs, dump in 2 pkgs of Sloppy Joe mix, 1 can diced tomatoes, an onion chopped in small pieces, a little brown sugar
    and less than a cup of water.. set the timer on 8 hrs and go outside and stay all day... otherwise the aroma really gets to you.!
    We've always done the same. Fill up the crock pot, coat generously with your favorite BBQ sauce recipe, add some beer and go to work. Ribs are ready and waiting when you get home.
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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    OK, thanks for all the ideas, planning to cook some today....keep the recipes coming.........!
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
    TR

  9. #9

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    Well, how was they?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cast Iron View Post
    Well, how was they?
    Well, They were plenty tasty, discovered the crock pot was dunbar, so ended up putting the rub on them and letting em sit in the refer for a day,

    Then Sunday I smoked them for 2 hours at about 200 degrees


    Took them out of the smoker


    And into the oven for 4 more hours at just under 300 degrees, I had them completely covered tightly with foil, but I did not put any liquid in the pan..


    They were tasty and not chewy, so were cooked enough, but they were a little dry......I couldn't quite wrap my mind around sticking them in a bunch of liquid after smoking them, but I think thats what I might try next time, Maybe in the dutch oven for 4-6 hours. In the end I added some BBQ sauce to moisten them up and that helped......they have a lot of meat on them and I have plenty left to practice on.
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
    TR

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    We take the short ribs (on those years I cut them that way), and boil in water with a bit of vinegar and non-iodized salt for maybe 20-40 minutes; it's always been a 'how do you feel about it..' kind of thing, as far as the time in boiling water goes.

    I then whip up a home-made barbecue sauce (we don't hardly ever buy any sauces or salad dressings, making them ourselves).

    For the sauce I use a fairly thick tomato sauce, either some form of vinegar or real lemon juice, granulated garlic, non-iodized salt, copious amounts of spicy ground black pepper, a bit of deep, dark red chili powder (with a bit of zip to it), a bit of hot sauce, some onion powder, honey and maple syrup to cut the acid of the vinegar or lemon juice and to sweeten it to taste, etc., a dabble of molasses (being careful not to over-do the molasses), and some mustard (either spicy brown or regular old French's if I'm out of decent cheap spicy brown mustard). Taste the sauce as you go, and let your taste buds tell you how much of what you need.

    *Not sure if I've forgotten anything or not; I often don't cook from a recipe in a book, etc.

    We take the short-ribs out of the water they've boiled in, then place them in a large cast iron skillet or Dutch oven, and bury them in the home-made barbecue sauce. Put the lid on the thing, or cover with good, stout tin foil.

    Turn the oven on to any where from 270 f. to 350 f. depending on how much time you have, how late you started, etc. If going for the 275 f. range in the oven, I try to let them bake all day for 6-10 hours. At 325 to 350, you can check them out in 3-4 hours, but the LONG, SLOW way is best, in my experience.

  12. #12

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    I've found that the hot temps is what drys game meat out. If the internal meat ever gets above 155 deg F on wild game, you have dry meat. I use a digital meat thermometer and use a cast iron stove top Dutch oven and bring the internal temp up to about 148 for 6,8 or 10 hours. Remember - slow n low. Works great on roasts and ribs. I always sear the meat on all sides with high heat and bacon grease for 5-10 minuets to seal them up. That 2 or 300 degree temps works on pork or other fat marbled meat but wild game turns to shoe leather. At least that's been my experience.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Predator Control View Post
    I've found that the hot temps is what drys game meat out. If the internal meat ever gets above 155 deg F on wild game, you have dry meat. I use a digital meat thermometer and use a cast iron stove top Dutch oven and bring the internal temp up to about 148 for 6,8 or 10 hours. Remember - slow n low. Works great on roasts and ribs. I always sear the meat on all sides with high heat and bacon grease for 5-10 minuets to seal them up. That 2 or 300 degree temps works on pork or other fat marbled meat but wild game turns to shoe leather. At least that's been my experience.
    That's been my experience when dry-roasting or smoking meats as well, especially if they're a tougher cut. Many a top sirloin steak, piece of back strap (NY steak/roast), or even tenderloin has been destroyed by too much cooking.

    But -also- with the tougher cuts (short ribs, bottom round, etc., etc.), I've experienced them falling apart, right off the bone if 'stewed' (as in buried) in barbecue sauce, marinade, etc. ('wet roasting') for longer periods of time, just as the tougher cuts of moose meat will fall apart and become very tender in a long-simmered stew.

    We do lose some of the fat from the ribs when initially boiling them, but based on the amount of grease present in the sauce surrounding the finished ribs when they come out of the Dutch oven (or cast iron skillet, or even a standard roaster will do), they seem to have a fair bit left to properly distribute throughout the dish.

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    How should I cook up my whole side mountain goat ribs? They won't fit in my crockpot. I don't have a roaster big enough to hold them to put them in the oven. Not even sure they will fit in my smoker. Maybe wrap tightly in foil and cook em on the BBQ slow....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    How should I cook up my whole side mountain goat ribs? They won't fit in my crockpot. I don't have a roaster big enough to hold them to put them in the oven. Not even sure they will fit in my smoker. Maybe wrap tightly in foil and cook em on the BBQ slow....
    Got a shovel? Ground's not froze yet
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  16. #16

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    I smoke them for about 6 hours using dry rub or a sauce. I use a charcoal smoker and put hickory chips on the charcoal. With a bowl of water above the heat source the humidity keeps the meat moist but they usually are still very tough. Then I toss them into the big pot to boil in beef broth. After they cook in beef broth for a few hrs add on your vegetables - Onion, bok choy, carrots, taters, beans ect.... makes a great soul rib and soup meal!

    http://www.brinkmann.net/products/de...tem=810-5301-C

    I smoked a prime roast from the moose last weekend on this smoker - smoked for 4 hrs with a dry rub, then grilled it at a very low heat for 1 hr. came out so moist, tender and medium. One of the best moose steaks I have ever had!

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    I think that they will be a little tough, but not terribly. The flavor of the mountain goat is one of the best I have had. Very - how should I say - nongamey.

    Made a wonderful blue cheese cream sauce over seared mountain goat tenderloin last week. Only kept the ribs, tenders, and straps for meat chunks - the rest got ground.

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    Member kobuk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Predator Control View Post
    I've found that the hot temps is what drys game meat out. If the internal meat ever gets above 155 deg F on wild game, you have dry meat. I use a digital meat thermometer and use a cast iron stove top Dutch oven and bring the internal temp up to about 148 for 6,8 or 10 hours. Remember - slow n low. Works great on roasts and ribs. I always sear the meat on all sides with high heat and bacon grease for 5-10 minuets to seal them up. That 2 or 300 degree temps works on pork or other fat marbled meat but wild game turns to shoe leather. At least that's been my experience.
    Just like Predator Control said is how we do it. Pressure cooker works pretty good, crock pot is ok for cooking while you are away but for the moistest (new word) and most tender there is something truly magical about a cast iron dutch oven and a slow and low in the oven. Searing in bacon fat before is awesome. The original way a friend showed me was to stack thawed short ribs around the outside of the pan and fill the middle up with vegetables and cook for 8-10 hrs real low. You can play around with BBQ sauce, different veggies put in at different stages so they don't overcook but in that dutch oven it comes out the best for some reason.

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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    We've always done the same. Fill up the crock pot, coat generously with your favorite BBQ sauce recipe, add some beer and go to work. Ribs are ready and waiting when you get home.
    I do something like this too. I am not a fan of crock pots though, so I do it the 'old fashioned' way.

    Make a dry rub from 2 parts brown sugar and 1 part kosher salt. Season the rub with what you like. I use ground sage, onion powder, garlic, powder, chili powder, and black pepper. Sometimes I will add some paprika to get a little more color in there.

    Rub the ribs down with a generous coating of the dry mix and arrange them in a roasting pan or baking dish deep enough for them.

    Fill the bottom of the roasting pan up one inch from the bottom with a 50/50 mix of water and beer. (Your choice in beer. Darker beers or lighter beers doesn't really matter just so long as you would drink it and not just cook with it.) Cover the pan with foil and place in a 275*F oven for 3-4 hours.

    You will see the bone ends start to show as the meat cooks and shrinks. When the meat starts to seperate from the bone they are done. Dont let it go too long or you will get pulled moose meat and a pile of bones.

    Cool them down and coat them with your favorite sauce. Grill or broil them to reheat and cook the sauce.

    Serve and enjoy!

  20. #20
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    I am still trying to figure out how to slow cook a whole side of the goat - kind of like the idea of smoking up the whole side instead of breaking it down - it'll make ya feel manly just holdin up that big of a bone to take a bite!

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