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Thread: Redshirt?

  1. #1

    Cool Redshirt?

    Anyone been out there yet? I figured since the weather has been all that great this spring that maybe the pike would spawn later. I know in the past when I've been out there over memorial weekend, the fishing was hot when the weather was hot.

  2. #2
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    I'll be heading out to redshirt on the 1st of june. I'll be there for 3 days. When I get back I'll post a report here. I've never been there before.

    BTW how is the trail to redshirt? Is it possible to bring along a cooler with wheels? Or would that be too much work trying to wheel it along the trail?

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    Default Redshirt lake trail

    The trail isnt that bad, i was there a few years ago and it was an awesome experience, the pike were super agressive. I would however recommend that you pack in your gear rather than carry or pull the cooler. The trail can get tight a some points. Good luck and happy fishing!

  4. #4
    Member Adventures's Avatar
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    Default redshirt

    i was lookingat doing the canoe rental thing there. What size fish are to be expected? i heard it's nothing but small ones now, but i find it hard to believe.
    Justin

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    Member Tomcat's Avatar
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    Exclamation Slow, but scenic...

    Three friends and I made the 2.5 mile hike into Redshirt Lake yesterday. For the most part, the trail was in good shape, but there were a few patches of mud to negotiate along the way, as well as some slippery spots on some of the hills. Then there was the never ending tangle of tree roots that criss-cross the trail. If your not paying attention, it's easy to trip or twist an ankle.

    During the walk in, we ran across a family pushing a stroller and pulling a cooler. They didn't seem to be having too much trouble, but were traveling at a fairly slow pace.

    For two of us, it was our first trip to this spot and our first attempt at pike fishing. We arrived around 11 a.m. and quickly launched our rental canoes. Only a few boats on the water and a just a couple of folks camping along the shoreline.

    However, it was a bit chaotic initially because one group of campers were rather rowdy and their dogs wouldn't stop barking and fighting with each other. Then there were two cracks of gunfire heard from the opposite side of the lake. So much for peace and solitude!

    A short time later, a cabin owner and her daughter paddled over to say that an aggressive black bear had staked out their property and refused to leave. Her husband had fired the shots in attempt to scare off the bruin, but it didn't even flinch. With the bear lurking around the cabin, the man was trapped inside while his wife and child were forced to wait out on the water until it was safe to return.

    Several boats decided to check out the situation. Sure enough, the bear was still on the front porch. It then moved underneath the cabin and rummaged around for a while. Eventually, it reached a side window and stood on two legs to look inside. Once the bear realized that there was a flotilla of canoes offshore watching, it decided to saunter off into the woods and dissapear. The family was reunited and we went back to fishing.

    Overall, catching was slow during the seven or so hours that we were there. I landed four and my boatmate got two. In the other canoe, our friends netted another four or five. We didn't measure or keep any of our pike, but my best guesstimate is that they were between 18 and 22 inches in length.

    When we spoke with two guys who fish the lake on a regular basis, they reported catching a total of nine keepers. For them, egg sucking leaches were the ticket.

    We had to work pretty hard for strikes and tried a lot of different lures. Most of our fish were hooked on submerged frogs with a slow retrieve close to the water's edge. However, I managed to get two pike to hit a jointed, floating rapala. There was zero surface action, which I found surprising because of a large insect hatch during our visit. Vegetation wasn't too bad and the water had a slight rust-colored tint to it. Wind was tolerable when it picked up later in the day and no rain until we got back on the trail for the hike back.

    Despite the less than stellar fishing results, it was an enjoyable experience and one that I look forward to trying again some time. I must admit, however, that my body is rather sore today from all of that hiking and paddling. Guess that's what happens when a person hibernates all winter, then tries to jump right back into the summer routine.

    Anyway, I hear that the pike get much more active in July. Something to consider. Good luck.

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    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Tomcat thanks for the info
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  7. #7
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    well I had to cancel my weekend to redshirt. So no report from me. I'm gonna have to put this trip off for a month or two. I did however read a report over on alaskoutdoorjournal that sounded good.

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    Hey Tomcat - I can sure relate to the pains of the first outings - I keep saying I'm going to do more in the winter...sigh :-)

    Anyway - Thanks for the update. My dad was thinking of heading out there as well - I'll pass along your report...he may hold off for a few.

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