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Thread: Are There Guns in the Household?

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    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    Default Are There Guns in the Household?

    I'm posting this with the assumption this is not, and will not, be a "2nd Amendment" issue.
    Took my 13 yr old daughter in for a "sports physical" which most all schools require yearly for students to participate in school sponsered sports. This particular exam was done at the Chief Andrew Isaac native clinic in Fbks.
    Sports physicals are fairly routine and don't require any detailed probing or tests. I was present during the exam. During the exam, the nurse practitioner asked some questions which I assume were geared towards the childs mental health. One was, "are there any guns in the house?" That question got my immediate attention and I stopped the exam while I, and not my daughter, answered that question. I told the woman it was none of their business if there were guns in my home and instructed her to write that that question was not answered. When asked later why she asked that question, she said possibly (she wasn't sure) that they may instruct on gun safety.
    There was another question asked I didn't like but that one isn't relevant to this forum.
    Anyway, I wasn't happy with the question. I took the exam paper to the school nurse personally, and also discussed that question with her. I wanted to be sure no school personal were asking that question.
    Do any of you work in the medical field and have more knowledge on this than us average Joes?
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Better get used to being asked this sort of thing. Smells like B.O. to me.
    Glad to see you stood your ground and didn't hand over info the authorities don't need to know. I hope there are LOTs more folks like you.

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    Member Meanderthal's Avatar
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    Sorry to say it but welcome to the brave new world. Also be aware that medical records are all going electronic for your own good. I'm sure there is plenty of room in the shiny new data storage facility in Utah to keep a fat file on a guy like you.

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    As long an answer of "No comment (or none of your business)" is acceptable, I don't see the harm of asking the question. It's clearly a question geared toward safety, just like when the dentist asks if I wear my seatbelt 100% of the time, or when the physician asks if I keep all medications locked up. No big deal.

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    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    The problem I see with ASKING these questions is when the parent isn't there. As I said, this was a routine exam. I coulda waited in the lobby. My kid would have answered any questions asked. A 13 yr old kid rarely knows what questions are NOT appropriate.
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frostbitten View Post
    As long an answer of "No comment (or none of your business)" is acceptable, I don't see the harm of asking the question. It's clearly a question geared toward safety, just like when the dentist asks if I wear my seatbelt 100% of the time, or when the physician asks if I keep all medications locked up. No big deal.
    The harm is that it IS NOT THEIR BUSINESS. The harm is that too many people don't know that anymore or feel pressured to respond.
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...lvic-exam.html

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    Yup, its a safety thing. Statistically kids under age 15 are way more likely to get a gun shot wound by accident from a gun in the home they are any other way. If you had said "yes there are guns in the home" the next question should have been "Are the guns kept locked in a safe?"

    The other side of the coin of course is that if you have taught your kids gun safety they are (probably) less likely to wound themselves then if you didn't have guns in the home at all. But statistics don't lie you know, and homes with guns....

    Other common questions would be 'Do you wear a seatbelt?" and "Are you or could you be pregnant?"

    Gotta go.

    FMH-RN

    EDIT: Another one is 'Do you wear a helmet when you ride a bicycle?' When I was a kid (Carter was in the White House) I couldn't even buy a bicycle helmet at the store. Those were for pros riding the tour de france. No I can't cross the garage to my reloading bench without tripping over a bicycle helmet.

    Currently these are all questions designed to screen for high risk behaviors with an eye towards preventing or reducing injuries to kids. How the government will deal with the data, massage the statistics or change the laws in the future is unknown.

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    Member Bsj425's Avatar
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    The correct answer is " No" and leave it at that. Any thing more or less than that you are inviting big brother into your life.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    I guess it is well past time to teach kids to say, "With all due respect, that is none of your business."... which, of course, may raise additional red flags for the questioner to notate on the form.
    Personally, I provide no more information to anyone at all- medical or otherwise- than I absolutely have to provide. When pressed, I give ambiguous or misleading information. They can see the NSA to fill in the blanks.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bsj425 View Post
    The correct answer is " No" and leave it at that. Any thing more or less than that you are inviting big brother into your life.
    Answering "No", may become very problematic soon.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by martentrapper View Post
    I'm posting this with the assumption this is not, and will not, be a "2nd Amendment" issue...
    The problem I see with ASKING these questions is when the parent isn't there. As I said, this was a routine exam. I coulda waited in the lobby. My kid would have answered any questions asked. A 13 yr old kid rarely knows what questions are NOT appropriate.
    You say you assume this is not a 2A issue. If not a 2A issue, then why your opposition to the question? What, in your mind, makes it an inappropriate question? The following questions are typical of a pediatric patient questionnaire and have been for many years:

    Do you know the hottest temperature of the water in your pipes?
    Is there a working smoke alarm on each floor in the house?
    Does your child always use a car seat/seat belt when riding in the care?
    Are there any smokers in the household?
    Are there any problems with the condition of your home
    (peeling paint, insects, rats or mice)?
    Are there any guns in the house?
    Are there any pets in the house?


    So, what about seatbelts, smoking, pets, smoke alarms...? Why no opposition those questions concerning the environmental safety condition that exists in the home? From a physicians perspective, these are all legitimate questions about conditions that have significant statistical relevance concerning the child's environment. If you feel it's nobodies business that you smoke like a chimney, keep 10 foot long Anacondas, and have lots of guns laying around, fine, just answer "that's none of your business".

    Quote Originally Posted by Frostbitten View Post
    As long an answer of "No comment (or none of your business)" is acceptable, I don't see the harm of asking the question. It's clearly a question geared toward safety, just like when the dentist asks if I wear my seatbelt 100% of the time, or when the physician asks if I keep all medications locked up. No big deal.
    ^^What he said.
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    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
    #Resist

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by martentrapper View Post
    The problem I see with ASKING these questions is when the parent isn't there. As I said, this was a routine exam. I coulda waited in the lobby. My kid would have answered any questions asked. A 13 yr old kid rarely knows what questions are NOT appropriate.

    I understand. All things being equal, I see this as being in the childs best interest. I don't see the question as inappropriate, nor do I think your answer was inappropriate. In the end, this is about the child, not the adult.

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    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    How many here support the D.A.R.E. program, yet find the gun question offensive?
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

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    Member Meanderthal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaHippie View Post
    How many here support the D.A.R.E. program, yet find the gun question offensive?
    There was time not so long ago, that none of these questions about drugs or guns would have concerned me. Now that big brother has crawled into bed between me and my doctor I have no intention of letting him get comfortable there.

    I don't consider myself an alarmist or conspiracy theorist of any sort but after the NSA scandal, IRS scandal, Fast & Furious cover-up etc. to trust the feds with my personal gun information would require more naivete than Neville Chamberlain circa 1938.

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    I thought of one other one not emntioned in thread yet. Domestic violence screening.

    Federal law for most licensed medical personell, RNs and up for sure, I don't know about EMTs, paramedics, CNAs or CMAs. At every encounter "we" are required to screen the patient for domestic violence. Do you feel safe at home? Is anyone stealing your money or taking advantage of you? Does your wife beat you? That sort of thing. And we are mandated reporters. If someone says yes we have to notify social services.

    It is what it is.

    Three things to never ask a teenaged female with her dad in the room:
    1. Are you sexually active?
    2. Do you use drugs?
    3. Does your dad beat you?

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frostbitten View Post
    I understand. All things being equal, I see this as being in the childs best interest. I don't see the question as inappropriate, nor do I think your answer was inappropriate. In the end, this is about the child, not the adult.
    And this is where people see things differently in regards to the role of government and privacy issues. Some believe that it is perfectly legitimate for government to ask as many questions as it sees fit in order to achieve the greater good, others believe that such questions go way beyond the role of government. We are falling on fairly predictable responses here.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    ..We are falling on fairly predictable responses here.
    Yeah, predictable as in: to most people a physician asking health related questions = a physician asking health related questions. And to some other people, a physician asking health related questions = the gubmnt is spying on me...
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
    #Resist

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    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    *Backspace Backspace Backspace*

    Beat me to it, Taiga....
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    Yeah, predictable as in: to most people a physician asking health related questions = a physician asking health related questions. And to some other people, a physician asking health related questions = the gubmnt is spying on me...
    In this case, I don't see how "are there guns in your household?" is a "health related question" in any way. True, a firearm in the household may increase the chances of an injury related to it, but then why not ask everything down to do you have railings on your stairs, how high off the ground is your bed, do you have a non-slip mat in the bathtub, etc...

    Like Sayak said, there are just far too many places now that government (or aspects not far separated such as schools) are being made to or told to do the job that parents should be doing. As it stands, parents no longer need to teach their kids about common dangers around the house because there are warning lables on anything even remotely dangerous, they don't have to even feed their kids since the schools will now provide free breakfast, lunch and probably dinner year round, and heck, they barely even have to provide clothes for their kids anymore.

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    And this is where people see things differently in regards to the role of government and privacy issues. Some believe that it is perfectly legitimate for government to ask as many questions as it sees fit in order to achieve the greater good, others believe that such questions go way beyond the role of government. We are falling on fairly predictable responses here.
    I don't know if you missed it, but this is about a physician, not the government asking these questions...but I do understand that some folks just cant tell the difference

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