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Thread: water in the oil

  1. #1

    Default water in the oil

    i have an evenrude 70 hp four cylinder. fuel injected. i was winterizing the boat this last weekend and found the oil about two quarts to high and it was all milky, i have been running the ocean for the last ten years with it. i am a firm believer in preventive maintenance.
    i did a compresion test on it and all cylinders where at 175 psi. are there any mechanics out there that know this engine and can give me a direction to go in. gasket, witch one? any help would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    More info please (two storke/four, and year), Since you are saying water in the oil, you are talking about the Suzuki 70hp fourstroke rebadged as an evinrude (?) yes? Otherwise you are talking about the lower unit (but then why mention doing a compression test).

    If I am correct you may want to ask this question as a suzuki question, and maybe in another site's outboard forum. The Suzuki motors have a few places where gaskets may fail and get water in the oil. Since all of your cylinders are reading the same your compression is most likely good (what does the service manual say is acceptable compression?). If this is true look look at the other gaskets on the powerhead and leave the top end alone.

    Sobie2

  3. #3

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    four stroke and it is a 98', top end, lower end is fine. i do not have a service manual for it yet, that is my next step. the research i have done this morning suggests that it was built by suzuki. thanks for the info.

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    Member L. G.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sobie2 View Post
    More info please (two storke/four, and year), Since you are saying water in the oil, you are talking about the Suzuki 70hp fourstroke rebadged as an evinrude (?) yes? Otherwise you are talking about the lower unit (but then why mention doing a compression test).
    Try getting two extra quarts of oil into a lower unit . . .

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    Better than oil in the water!

    Your Friends at the EPA

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bering Nomad View Post
    i have an evenrude 70 hp four cylinder. fuel injected. i was winterizing the boat this last weekend and found the oil about two quarts to high and it was all milky, i have been running the ocean for the last ten years with it. i am a firm believer in preventive maintenance.
    i did a compresion test on it and all cylinders where at 175 psi. are there any mechanics out there that know this engine and can give me a direction to go in. gasket, witch one? any help would be appreciated.
    I have the same model outboard...mine is a '99...and had the same problem early this season...or at least the symptoms sound the same. It was a stuck thermostat. The engine would not warm up enough to evaporate condensation and so the condensation continued to accumulate. The engine seemed to run just fine...so trust me when I say It about heart attacked me when I checked the oil upon returning from my 1st trip to PWS. It looked like a tan milkshake. I'm not a mechanic but I hope this helps you.

  7. #7

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    Does your oil smell like fuel?

  8. #8
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garyak View Post
    I have the same model outboard...mine is a '99...and had the same problem early this season...or at least the symptoms sound the same. It was a stuck thermostat. The engine would not warm up enough to evaporate condensation and so the condensation continued to accumulate. The engine seemed to run just fine...so trust me when I say It about heart attacked me when I checked the oil upon returning from my 1st trip to PWS. It looked like a tan milkshake. I'm not a mechanic but I hope this helps you.
    Yes. I had the same problem last year on my Honda 90... got all worried. Turned out to be a shot thermostat.

  9. #9

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    no, it's not fuel, it was definitely water. I will check the thermostat, thanks for the replies.

  10. #10

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    I am not saying it's all fuel. Just asking the questions to help determine what the problem would be. Those engines are also know for other gasket issues allowing water into your oil. But..When you have a bad t stat and you are not reaching normal operating temps you will push unburnt fuel by the rings. That it just sometimes another indicator that your not reaching operating temperature while running, I.e bad t stat. This same thing can happen when idling around at low rpm's for to long. Sometimes you can over come this when you run wide open back to the harbor heating the oil up enough to burn off any condensation and unburnt fuel. Good luck

  11. #11

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    thanks for the info, i was out of seward just outside the harbor trolling for about six hours, i had done the same thing a couple weeks earlier but with no water in the oil, i am going to replace the t stat and give it a try this weekend, it is a cheap part to replace before i tear deeper into the engine, thanks again for all the ideas and info.

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    Default compression test is not a valad answer

    A leak down test is the correct test to perform on the head, and it will reveal where the leak is to some degree.Runing any engine in the ocean will acquire corrosion specialy if the Zinc annodes are all used up.Even they are not rock solid insurance. Air craft mechanic would know how to perform it.I worked on boats 18 years mostly on fresh water boats but salt water engines would make their way there as well . Thermostat has nothing to do with water in the oil it controls the water tempreture only, so the engine does not run too cold . if some one changes the thermostat and saw no more water in the oil , it only means the temp was allowed to rise high enough to boil out the water ,,, not stop the water from leaking in.Either it is corrosion through the exhaust manifold which Mercuries are notorous for, or a blown head gasket. Usually if there is a slight amount of water in the engine it will boil out and you'd never notice it . This is water that is comming in at a heavier volume ,and trooling can not cause this either. I would consult a dealer on the problem ,I bet it is some what common for that engine . Salt water and motors are not good bed fellows. lite air Prssure tests leak down on the heads, and crank case and water circuts should reveal the truth. I would make a tool with an air prssure regulator (5 psi ) that I can attach to the crank case breather and plug the dip stick hole and listen carefully to the exhaust . Take a stethiscope with no tip just the hose and scout around the engine ,every orface it has . Even pull the spark plugs and listen to the air leak past the rings ,(in place of not having a leak down tester.)

  13. #13
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arleigh View Post
    ...Thermostat has nothing to do with water in the oil it controls the water tempreture only, so the engine does not run too cold . if some one changes the thermostat and saw no more water in the oil , it only means the temp was allowed to rise high enough to boil out the water ,,, not stop the water from leaking in.Either it is corrosion through the exhaust manifold which Mercuries are notorous for, or a blown head gasket. Usually if there is a slight amount of water in the engine it will boil out and you'd never notice it . This is water that is comming in at a heavier volume ,and trooling can not cause this either. I would consult a dealer on the problem ,I bet it is some what common for that engine . Salt water and motors are not good bed fellows. lite air Prssure tests leak down on the heads, and crank case and water circuts should reveal the truth. I would make a tool with an air prssure regulator (5 psi ) that I can attach to the crank case breather and plug the dip stick hole and listen carefully to the exhaust . Take a stethiscope with no tip just the hose and scout around the engine ,every orface it has . Even pull the spark plugs and listen to the air leak past the rings ,(in place of not having a leak down tester.)
    Interesting, since it was my local Honda mechanic who told me it was my thermostat and that it was a common problem.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arleigh View Post
    A leak down test is the correct test to perform on the head, and it will reveal where the leak is to some degree.Runing any engine in the ocean will acquire corrosion specialy if the Zinc annodes are all used up.Even they are not rock solid insurance. Air craft mechanic would know how to perform it.I worked on boats 18 years mostly on fresh water boats but salt water engines would make their way there as well . Thermostat has nothing to do with water in the oil it controls the water tempreture only, so the engine does not run too cold . if some one changes the thermostat and saw no more water in the oil , it only means the temp was allowed to rise high enough to boil out the water ,,, not stop the water from leaking in.Either it is corrosion through the exhaust manifold which Mercuries are notorous for, or a blown head gasket. Usually if there is a slight amount of water in the engine it will boil out and you'd never notice it . This is water that is comming in at a heavier volume ,and trooling can not cause this either. I would consult a dealer on the problem ,I bet it is some what common for that engine . Salt water and motors are not good bed fellows. lite air Prssure tests leak down on the heads, and crank case and water circuts should reveal the truth. I would make a tool with an air prssure regulator (5 psi ) that I can attach to the crank case breather and plug the dip stick hole and listen carefully to the exhaust . Take a stethiscope with no tip just the hose and scout around the engine ,every orface it has . Even pull the spark plugs and listen to the air leak past the rings ,(in place of not having a leak down tester.)
    I have to disagree. A bad t stat will show water in oil almost every time. Not saying a head gasket or manifold leak couldn't be the problem.. But start cheap replace the t stat. I've seen on many outboards this same problem. I've also seen many go in to a "shop" and walk out with a 1000 dollar bill in work for a new gasket and turn around and go right back in to come out with a brand new t stat, that fixes the prob.

    And second if your gonna consider a leak down you better add a zero to that 5 psi to get useful results. Last one I did 50 psi was our starting point. We ended up finding the problem up around 85 psi. Four stokes are good with up to around 15%, if you dare a ld test on a 2 stoke you can only get away with 10%.

    Just my two bits..

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    Default Actually the leak down tester is calibrated @100 psi per the regulator

    That is why I recomened a pro to test it.I was refirring to testing the crank case @5 psi, not wishing to blow out any seals in it.Like I said though the thermostat keeps the temp UP which causes the water to boil out ,but the fact of the matter is there is a failure in the water jacket and usually it is around the exhaust manifold on the block. A hotter thermostat is only a bandaid not the solution. 2 quarts hi is significant and any water in the oil will compromise the bearings.No skin off my nose ,I made a living fixing other folks repairs.

  16. #16

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    thanks for all the info. changed out the thermostat a few months ago but finallly got out on the water this last weekend and motor ran good and no water in the oil, Thermostat was definatly stuck open when i changed it.
    thanks agian.

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