Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: lynx hunting techniques

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    fairbanks
    Posts
    26

    Lightbulb lynx hunting techniques

    So I am as new as they come for trapping and overall wolf/lynx hunting but im very interested in bagging one this year come december when the season starts so any advice would be greatly appriciated im also doing alot. Not sure of the best approach when it comes to hunting them. thanks to any responders

  2. #2
    Member Bsj425's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    North Pole, Alaska
    Posts
    1,060

    Default

    If not trapping I have found calling over a decoy to be quite successful. Calling in Alaska is pretty difficult compared to pretty much anywhere in the lower 48 that I have hunted with a caller. I would look for freshish tracks then set up your stand. Lynx are usually very cautious when coming in and will hang out further back if you are calling a clearing so just look for any movement because they probably wont show themselves completely like a fox or coyote they sort of stalk their way in. I have called a lynx in 5 minutes but that is NOT the norm by far usually with lynx it has been 15 to 20 minutes before they will come in.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    fairbanks
    Posts
    26

    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by Bsj425 View Post
    If not trapping I have found calling over a decoy to be quite successful. Calling in Alaska is pretty difficult compared to pretty much anywhere in the lower 48 that I have hunted with a caller. I would look for freshish tracks then set up your stand. Lynx are usually very cautious when coming in and will hang out further back if you are calling a clearing so just look for any movement because they probably wont show themselves completely like a fox or coyote they sort of stalk their way in. I have called a lynx in 5 minutes but that is NOT the norm by far usually with lynx it has been 15 to 20 minutes before they will come in.

    thanks alot for the response what kind of decoy do you use just wondering? what unit do you hunt them in i was under the impression you would have to leave the fairbanks area to see any tracks alot of foxes though im seeing with this snow today.

  4. #4
    Member Bsj425's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    North Pole, Alaska
    Posts
    1,060

    Default

    I use a mojo critter. They have them at sportsmans warehouse. You will probably have to build a base out of wood or get the extended stake due to deep snow.

    http://www.allpredatorcalls.com/mojo...-decoy-hw5121/

  5. #5
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,393

    Default

    I am still relatively new to the predator hunting gig, but I've found some success with lynx in the past two seasons. I haven't been able to call in a single fox and have managed to bring in only a single coyote, so in my limited experience it seems like lynx are easier than canines. They take a while to come in, but they're not sensitive to scent like canines are and they tend to be very curious. I've brought in five in the past two seasons in a fairly limited number of outings. Three of those five were not taken immediately and did not spook easily at all. Two sat right down and watched us while another came in 15 minutes after another had been shot and after my partner and I had talked for a few minutes. We left the caller running, and amazingly another came in.

    I'm sure if I were a more skilled caller that I'd have more lynx and possibly some more canines to my credit, but thus far I'm pleased. My only approach has been to set on sign (call where there are tracks), get the best view I can of where I figure they'll come from, use a hare-in-distress call, and hike into areas that others apparently do not use. I also hang a ptarmigan wing from a branch above the caller to give some visual distraction, but the wind has usually been dead when I've called, so I'm not sure how much that has mattered.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    fairbanks
    Posts
    26

    Default

    well i hope to have that much success this year come november. im going to try to start my approach to trapping with beavers here in a couple days hopefully that will get me heading in the right direction. I think ive found a pretty nice area for red fox trapping as well accidently called one in this morning while duck calling for ducks lol

  7. #7
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,393

    Default

    Good luck to you, Mike. I'd offer to join you, but I'm down south, so it's not likely that we'll cross paths. A few pics for motivation - and if you get a lynx, try the meat! It cooks up light and is a wonderful flavor. Seriously. Don't throw it away like a coyote until you try it - it's wonderful in stir fry!










  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    AK
    Posts
    4,034

    Default

    I love the pix Brian, thanks for sharing! I like your stir fry idea, I might try that tomorrow night, I've still got some in the freezer!

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    fairbanks
    Posts
    26

    Smile

    great idea looks amazing I will deffinatly be trying out the decoy and calling technique this year thanks for all advice and replys

  10. #10
    Member akguy454's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    norh pole AK
    Posts
    228

    Default

    one thing to remember is that they are very sneeky. Have shot many that I have found just staring at me, never seen them come in. So don't always look for movement, look closely at the base of trees while calling. I have found that cats come to the call more than dogs as with brian's experience. And a decoy is like crack to them. They will sit and stare at it. If you do a search on this forum I had a post of " great weekend" and only took half the animals I seen. But most of them were cats.

  11. #11
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,393

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by akguy454 View Post
    So don't always look for movement, look closely at the base of trees while calling.
    That was exactly the case with my first cat. I hid myself really well under some low-hanging spruce boughs - too low, actually, as I had a pretty limited view. While scanning I noticed a slightly off color right at ground level. I stared and stared at it waiting for movement, but five minutes later it still hadn't moved and I started to think that it was just a birch tree. It then occurred to me to look up to see if there was more to that tree. Nope - turns out that it was a lynx just sitting perfectly still and that I hadn't seen him come in.

  12. #12
    Member OldSchool45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    122

    Default

    akguy, I remember the post from last season. That was an awesome weekend! I been trying for 2 winters now to get a cat or anything else to come in and finally had a gorgeous cross fox come in last weekend while I was calling for bear. Didn't shoot it because I only had my .300 and because I couldn't remember if fox season had opened. The fox swam right through a creek to get to me and at 20ft it saw me trying to get the camera out of my pocket. I mostly hunt the few roadways within an hour of Fairbanks and have had a couple coyotes and fox yip at me and that's it.. I use mouth calls as well as a fury and decoy. Do you think taking the binos and glassing might help spot a cat holed up in the brush or is it too much movement?

  13. #13
    Member OldSchool45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    122

    Default

    In the lower 48 I have had bobcats come in to distress calls after using coyote vocalizations as if they didn't seem to be scared of coyotes if it meant an easy meal. Have any of you had the same experience with lynx or do they tend to shy away if coyote/fox sounds are used prior to distress sounds?

  14. #14

    Default

    The only thing I'll add is pay attention to when fur comes into prime! Usually around the interior that's not until the end of nov or into dec. go talk with Joe Mattie he'll set u straight. After all that brown nov 1 cat could fetch enough for a new rifle or more a few weeks later!

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •