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Thread: Cannon-v-Scotty

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    Member Micky_Ireland's Avatar
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    Default Cannon-v-Scotty

    What is the current consensus regarding both of the downrigger manufacturers named above. Im quite sure that they both make very reliable and fantastic downriggers for fishing. What is the preference of the readers of this forum and if possible there reasons for there choice's. I had been already sold on the scotty brand but I have had to take a serious look at the Cannon stable as it appears to be a very serious contender within this category....................Thanks from ireland

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    For me it all boils down to service. On that account, Scotty is superb and Canon SUCKS big time. No contest.

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    Member kodiakbound's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    For me it all boils down to service. On that account, Scotty is superb and Canon SUCKS big time. No contest.
    What he said......
    Experience is a hard teacher because you get the test first and the lesson afterwards.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    For me it all boils down to service. On that account, Scotty is superb and Canon SUCKS big time. No contest.
    Another ditto on that. I lost a small part overboard that I couldn't find locally, called Scotty in Canada and next thing I knew, it showed up in the mail, no charge. That's service!

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    Member bobmikk's Avatar
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    Good news, Cannons are very easy to work on. Breaks apart quickly and parts are easy to get on-line. It's pretty basic DIY. I've had my Uni-troll 10 completely apart for two issues. First the line came off the spool and got tangled inside the lower spool area. So, that was a good epxerience to get acquainted with the spooling mechanism of the downrigger. Second issue, the base plate (lexan) cracked...this is a concern to me, as at times you will hit the bottom with the ball (which I did) and that was sufficient to do the damage...new plate was $10. I think a thicker base plate or an aluminum version would be ideal.

    Actually there are only a handful of moving parts on this unit and should be easily serviceable by the owner.

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    I own Scotty's on all my boats I use here in Coffman (5). Scotty has fantastic customer service and has shipped parts immediately as needed. I also store many parts for when they break. I am going with Cannons next year on a few boats to see if they hold up better on a rental. The scottys are a CONSTANT maintenance issue and even on my own boat I have to adjust them all the time. Maybe it is from constant use, 90 days per year minimal, but they seem to need a lot of upkeep. I run all manuals.
    Mike
    www.coffmancoveak.com
    Prince of Wales Island

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    Member Micky_Ireland's Avatar
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    Gooch what sort of constant maintenance are we talking about exactly and what parts do you keep close at hand so that you can repair it yourself. It will give me a good idea of workings and pressure points of the unit.

  8. #8

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    For low maintenance, go with hand crank cannons. For electrics, go with scotty.

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    Member jaydog's Avatar
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    We just put the first season of use on a pair of Scotty electrics. No maintenance problems at all and I'd estimate somewhere around 120 hrs of use this year. Based on my experience, I'd strongly recommend spooling them with Spectra rather than stainless steel. (we have one of each) Give them a freshwater rinse at the end of the day. Carry some spare fuses for those occasions when you or someone else mess up and leave the unit pulling against the terminal snubber (voice of experience!). The Scotty electrics are strong units - they'll easily pull a 15 lb ball. We keep some spare belts on the boat, but didn't need them. So far, they're living up to their reputation for being strong and trouble free.

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    Member L. G.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    For low maintenance, go with hand crank cannons.
    I run UniTroll HP's - hand crankers w/ 1.5:1 gear ratio.

    Never understood the horizonatal plane wheel of the Scotty for a hand cranker. What a PITA.

  11. #11

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    I'm pretty sure Scotty made the horizontal plane wheel so that everybody who tried them would immediately upgrade to the electric model.

    handcrankers ain't bad, if running cannons. I've caught a 40lb king solo, using two downriggers here in the winter using hand cranks. You've got to be willing to free spool kings, but it can be done.

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    What do you mean "You've got to be willing to free spool kings" ? You mean just let them run while you crank up the ball? I have scottys on my skiff, not a fan of the horizontal plane either....

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    Member Micky_Ireland's Avatar
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    Excellent question Dr.no. What does the term free spooling mean, in that context??????????????

  14. #14

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    I flip the spool in free spool, let the king do what it does, (which is 99% of the time sit there) and get all my gear out of the water. Then, I grab the rod and fight the king.

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    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    I have owned both Scotty and Cannon manual down riggers, and fished with Scotty and Cannon electric models.

    I don't really like the way the manual Scotty's crank, and my Cannons have lasted me 20 years (and I just did a brake job on them), I also have newer manual Cannons's too.

    I like both Scotty and Cannon power down riggers, but with the Cannon's you can't run braided trolling line if you want to (I haven't yet but then again I don't know what I am missing). I prefer the Cannon up and down toggle switch over the Scotty brake to lower and green button to power up.

    There are a few people who use Penn manual down riggers too.

    Most people end up having the boat dealer install the downriggers at the time of the boat purchase and so they get to "choose" from what ever the boat dealer carries.

    Sobie2

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    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    I spent 15 years chartering on Lake Ontario and have used several different types of riggers.
    I have used Walker, Cannon and Big Jon electrics as well as the Cannon manuals on my own boat.
    When I was chartering my favorites were the Big Jon Captains Pak electrics.
    The Cannons were nice but I didn't like the ball retrieval system on them as they slip when the retrieval rope begins to wear (this doesn't take long with use).
    The Walkers were decent enough and had no issues with them.
    What I really liked about the Big Jon's was the boom lifts up. When you do this the ball swings toward you and is easy to grab.
    The Walkers and Cannons both had me leaning out over the transom trying to get to the ball.

    To me the Big Jon's were just easier and safer to use because of this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    I flip the spool in free spool, let the king do what it does, (which is 99% of the time sit there) and get all my gear out of the water. Then, I grab the rod and fight the king.
    So the king pops it off the downrigger and you put it in neutral and pull in your gear? Going to try and catch a winter king this year, so I'm taking notes...

  18. #18

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    I give it some cranks to make sure that barb is punched through. Get that rod really bent over. Then carefully free spool, making sure you don't backlash. Once you take the tension off a king, it stops running. Never understood the advice of "don't give it slack, you'll lose it!", once a fish is hooked with the barb punched in. I've tried that multiple times when I get a hook stuck in my hand, and that darn hook never falls out. (grin) We had a year where we released 10-30 kings a day, during the peak of the run. A properly hook king does not get off, unless released by a gaff. No matter how much slack or poor fighting techniques are employed. But, even the most skilled fishermen will often lose a poorly hooked kings, no matter how perfect they are in fighting it.

    BTW, if you think catching 1 king is fun by yourself, get into a double in the winter king fishery, with manual hand cranks and solo. It's really fun.

  19. #19
    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    I give it some cranks to make sure that barb is punched through. Get that rod really bent over. Then carefully free spool, making sure you don't backlash. Once you take the tension off a king, it stops running. Never understood the advice of "don't give it slack, you'll lose it!", once a fish is hooked with the barb punched in. I've tried that multiple times when I get a hook stuck in my hand, and that darn hook never falls out. (grin) We had a year where we released 10-30 kings a day, during the peak of the run. A properly hook king does not get off, unless released by a gaff. No matter how much slack or poor fighting techniques are employed. But, even the most skilled fishermen will often lose a poorly hooked kings, no matter how perfect they are in fighting it.

    BTW, if you think catching 1 king is fun by yourself, get into a double in the winter king fishery, with manual hand cranks and solo. It's really fun.
    You don't want to try that technique in the waters of BC though as they are all barbless there.
    They get off really easily if there's no barb to hold them.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by DRIFTER_016 View Post
    You don't want to try that technique in the waters of BC though as they are all barbless there.
    They get off really easily if there's no barb to hold them.
    Haven't tried it with conventional tackle yet, but with fly hooks Limerick bend barbless hooks hold incredibly well compared to any round or "octopus" bend. That sharp angle at the bottom of the bend seems to "wedge" in their mouths. I don't think any barbless would hold for long with a flasher or dodger in front of it, but those limerick bends really hold well on a bare line. Here is my favorite limerick for fly fishing salmon.

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