Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Holster too tight

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,809

    Default Holster too tight

    Is there some quick way to loosen or break-in a new holster?

    I'm sure it will loosen up over time.

    BUT, I seem to remember a post about this.

    Thanks
    SOTN
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    Is there some quick way to loosen or break-in a new holster?

    I'm sure it will loosen up over time.

    BUT, I seem to remember a post about this.

    Thanks
    SOTN
    I am a holster maker and what I usually tell customers to do if it's just a bit too tight is to wrap the gun in several layers of cling-wrap or plastic grocery bags and force it into the holster and leave it for a while. If needed, twist and work the gun around in there a little first. If it is really tight, you can dunk the holster in some warm water and repeat the procedure, but make sure your gun is wrapped up good. I typically use the Glad Press-n-seal Wrap when wet forming a newly made holster as it makes a watertight seal. I've not once had an issue with moisture on or in a gun using that product. If you do go the wet route, be sure to apply a light coat of Neatsfoot oil to the leather after it dries. Extra Virgin Olive oil will do in a pinch. Must be Extra Virgin though, any other will go rancid.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    788

    Default

    I have always used saran wrap and a quick dunk and run the pistol in and let sit over night as stated above. This a good idea with the Virgin Olive oil that one I will remember.

    Sweepint
    Wasilla, (when not overseas)
    '' Livn' The Dream ''
    26' Hewescraft Cuddy, twin 115 Yam

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    466

    Default

    I am pretty sure Evan knows more about this than me, but plus three or whatever to the idea. Wrap the gun real good in saran wrap, quick dunk in a bucket of water for the holster, jam the gun in there and leave it a day or two.

    Beware using too much Lexol once the leather dries, if it gets too soft it will sag.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,809

    Default

    Thanks.
    I've been workin with it.
    It's workin better now.

    I think it is the design of the holster that caused it to be flat.

    The holster is from Ruger, for a Mk III, and there is no fold around the front like most holsters. It's stitched both front and back because it has a "sight track".

    SOTN
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  6. #6
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by evandailey View Post
    I am a holster maker and what I usually tell customers to do if it's just a bit too tight is to wrap the gun in several layers of cling-wrap or plastic grocery bags and force it into the holster and leave it for a while. If needed, twist and work the gun around in there a little first. If it is really tight, you can dunk the holster in some warm water and repeat the procedure, but make sure your gun is wrapped up good. I typically use the Glad Press-n-seal Wrap when wet forming a newly made holster as it makes a watertight seal. I've not once had an issue with moisture on or in a gun using that product. If you do go the wet route, be sure to apply a light coat of Neatsfoot oil to the leather after it dries. Extra Virgin Olive oil will do in a pinch. Must be Extra Virgin though, any other will go rancid.
    Yup, I agree with everything except never use neatsfoot oil unless you know the stitching isnt linen thread. Neatsfoot is great stuff for leather but the stuff rots cotton/linen something awful! Lexoll, mink oil, saddle soap, leather new, elephant grease all do a good job without rotting linen stitching . . . I like Leather New best myself but its hard to find in Alaska.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    466

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
    Lexoll, mink oil, saddle soap, leather new, elephant grease all do a good job without rotting linen stitching . . . I like Leather New best myself but its hard to find in Alaska.
    I use linen thread for all my homemade leather stuff. Lexol is available in Fbx at Pioneer Outfitters, and Land-of-Goshen O'Reilly's auto parts.

  8. #8
    Member S.B.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    680

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
    Yup, I agree with everything except never use neatsfoot oil unless you know the stitching isnt linen thread. Neatsfoot is great stuff for leather but the stuff rots cotton/linen something awful! Lexoll, mink oil, saddle soap, leather new, elephant grease all do a good job without rotting linen stitching . . . I like Leather New best myself but its hard to find in Alaska.
    I can't find leather any place since PETA and other animal rights groups has taken over things, they've been instrumental in most tanneries in America closing.
    Steve

  9. #9
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by S.B. View Post
    I can't find leather any place since PETA and other animal rights groups has taken over things, they've been instrumental in most tanneries in America closing.
    Steve
    That is true, its a shadow of what it once was and most of the good stuff comes from Europe where they dont brand livestock (Ive seen south of the border hides that were all brands) and have fewer bugs that scar up the hide. EPA nightmare has a lot to do with it too.


    Tandy has stores in Elgin and Peoria Illinois or you can order online from them. There are several industry suppliers also if you need large quantities and better quality.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southwest Alaska
    Posts
    2,145

    Default

    Got to Thomas.net to find anything manufactured in th United States or anywhere else.

    If you are looing for heavy duty leathers, of any species, go here: Horween.com
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

    Better living through chemistry (I'm a chemist)

    You can piddle with the puppies, or run with the wolves...

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •