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Thread: Chimney leaking inside the cabin

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    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Default Chimney leaking inside the cabin

    My 6" stovepipe has started leaking. Never leaked for 15 years, then I moved the cabin. It is dripping on the top of the stove and running onto the floor. Went up and everything looks good.

    Am I supposed to seal any of the joints above the roofline? The only one I can think of is the conical shaped flashing where the pipe meets the roof. If so, seal it with what?

    I do get creosote running down the outside of the pipe, but it has always done that.

    Thanks for any ideas. }:>
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    Question

    Is your stovepipe jointed correctly? . . top piece into the piece below? Any creosote should thus stay inside the chimney.


    If your joints are bottom piece into the piece above, creosote can leak at the joints.

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    Where your pipe goes through the conical flashing there should be a storm collar on top of that. Kind of a counter flashing. It's about a 2" wide ring that slides down over the pipe and sits on top of the joint where the pipe meets the roof jack.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bear View Post
    Where your pipe goes through the conical flashing there should be a storm collar on top of that. Kind of a counter flashing. It's about a 2" wide ring that slides down over the pipe and sits on top of the joint where the pipe meets the roof jack.

    Good point . . you can see the storm collar in this photo . . . roof jack, storm collar, chimney cap . .

    Attachment 73798

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    Water will still leak around a storm collar if it rains enough. My house stack leaked a few times lately. My Cabin metalbestos stacks have synthetic rubber stretch gaskets on the roof jacks. Zero leaks past those. You can seal the top of a standard jack with silicone but it'll need to be dry to do it.

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    Sikaflex is your friend in this case. GREAT stuff, spendy ($25/tube) but works.
    BK

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    get a gallon of Henry Roof Patch and slather it on everything. It's ugly but it works. Try to think like a raindrop.
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    get a gallon of Henry Roof Patch and slather it on everything. It's ugly but it works. Try to think like a raindrop.
    Geezh you guys and your muck...lol It does work though..

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    Normally your storm collar is the problem here, place the collar as far down on the flashing as it will go without forces it. Take some 100% silicon clear and run a bead over the top of the storm collar then take your finger and lightly depress the bead all the way around the chimney. The other possible leak area could be coming form the very top of the flashing and or if this is a metal roof and there was a seam that splits the flashing. If the pipe is leaking creosote then you have the pipe installed upside down as stated earlier in the thread.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sweepint View Post
    Normally your storm collar is the problem here, place the collar as far down on the flashing as it will go without forces it. Take some 100% silicon clear and run a bead over the top of the storm collar then take your finger and lightly depress the bead all the way around the chimney. The other possible leak area could be coming form the very top of the flashing and or if this is a metal roof and there was a seam that splits the flashing. If the pipe is leaking creosote then you have the pipe installed upside down as stated earlier in the thread.
    100% clear silicone is such a crap product, especially for exterior use, I haven't used it for years....if something says "not paintable" that's a pretty big red flag. If paint won't stick to it, why would it stick to anything else? I don't know how many times I've seen clear sillycone rot and peel off after a few years of exposure to sun/water. So many better choices these days (Lexel, for example)....
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    Butyl should really be used on metal flashing.....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Ah ha!

    I think you guys have hit it on the head.
    I do not have the smaller ring on the top of the conical flashing. I do kind of remember there being one before I moved the cabin.

    I have a tube of sikaflex. That stuff sticks, but the one I have is a bit runny to stay on the side of the pipe.

    I think a trip to the stove store is in order. I'll see what he recommends also for sealing the collar.

    Thanks for the help, love this place. }:>
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    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Ok, I went to the stove store. I picked up the storm collar. When I asked about sealing he recommended silicone. I'm with Cdubbin on this one, silicone doesn't stay for long. I'm going with the Sikaflex, I have some stiffer blend than I thought. I couldn't find anything on butyl that I could use here.

    Marcus & Sweepint are correct, I have my pipes joints buttbackwards. I was told by the guy that helped with the install my it would keep the smoke in the pipe.

    Now if I could get a plane lined up, (some big funeral) I would get over there and get on it. Then moose hunting. }:>

    Thanks again guys!
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    Quote Originally Posted by bullbuster View Post
    Ok, I went to the stove store. I picked up the storm collar. When I asked about sealing he recommended silicone. I'm with Cdubbin on this one, silicone doesn't stay for long. I'm going with the Sikaflex, I have some stiffer blend than I thought. I couldn't find anything on butyl that I could use here.

    Marcus & Sweepint are correct, I have my pipes joints buttbackwards. I was told by the guy that helped with the install my it would keep the smoke in the pipe.

    Now if I could get a plane lined up, (some big funeral) I would get over there and get on it. Then moose hunting. }:>

    Thanks again guys!
    The storm collar can get battered by chunks of ice falling from the top cap, small branches falling from nearby trees during wind storms etc. When you install it be sure it's cinched down good and tight to the pipe. Install it about an inch or so above the top of the roof jack. Most of them have a tab and slot system of fastening. Pull the tab through a slot, pull it tight, double it back and put a screw through it to keep it tight. For caulking I like to use Form-a-gasket high temp RTV silicone from NAPA (choose your favorite color, they all work equally well and will hold up for many years). The Sikaflex should work just fine too.

    (The guy who told you bout keeping the smoke in the pipe led you astray. Flip that pipe right side up and you'll be much happier (and safer)).
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    Well I had a install business outside for almost 18yrs and installed several thousand stoves and never once had a problem with clear 100% silicon. It never got hard or flake or chipped away, it always stayed flexible for expansion and contraction as pipe heated and cool. There is no doubt that there maybe new products out there by now, I will say that silicon will not stick if the pipe is wet.
    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    100% clear silicone is such a crap product, especially for exterior use, I haven't used it for years....if something says "not paintable" that's a pretty big red flag. If paint won't stick to it, why would it stick to anything else? I don't know how many times I've seen clear sillycone rot and peel off after a few years of exposure to sun/water. So many better choices these days (Lexel, for example)....

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    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    OK, that's 2 professionals voting silicone. Good enough for me.

    Yes, the collar is a slot and tab affair, tighten and add a screw. }
    And flip the pipe! That does make me nervous. The creosote would burn into little sparklies in the dark. Lay awake watching that!
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    Quote Originally Posted by bullbuster View Post
    OK, that's 2 professionals voting silicone. Good enough for me.

    Yes, the collar is a slot and tab affair, tighten and add a screw. }
    And flip the pipe! That does make me nervous. The creosote would burn into little sparklies in the dark. Lay awake watching that!

    bullbuster, as an afterthought, you might do well to figure out why you're getting so much creosote. The wetter the wood, the more creosote formed; the cooler the fire, the more creosote formed. Ideally, one's wood should be dry enough and the fire hot enough for the creosote to pass off in gaseous form. When creosote gas condenses inside the chimney, sticking to the interior of the pipe, that's a recipe for a chimney fire.




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    Marcus, good video there are several possible reasons for that chimney fire in the video. I would agree with your question as well on the "why" for all the creosote build up. Bullbuster rule of thumb for burning is a min of 500 degrees on a thermometer that is on the pipe about 12'' to 16'' above the stove. If the wood is dry and you are burning hot enough you should not get 2nd or 3rd degree creosote build up in the chimney. There are several factors as stated above that could cause the build up as well.

    Sweepint
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    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweepint View Post
    is a min of 500 degrees on a thermometer
    Oh good, now I know what to look for on that thermometer I picked up!

    I have a good idea why I get creosote. To much work and not enough time to take care of everything. I have an excavator, dozer, track rig, 4 wheeler, 2 sno machines and 4 trucks of various shapes. Always something to work on. An old guy down the lane feels he can come empty my woodpile at will doesn't help. (he's almost 80 so I don't mind)
    Getting the wood cut is almost an afterthought. If it weren't for beetle kill, I wouldn't have any dry wood!

    Thanks guys, flight booked for noon. 10-7 to the cabin! }:>
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    100% clear silicone is such a crap product, especially for exterior use, I haven't used it for years....if something says "not paintable" that's a pretty big red flag. If paint won't stick to it, why would it stick to anything else? I don't know how many times I've seen clear sillycone rot and peel off after a few years of exposure to sun/water. So many better choices these days (Lexel, for example)....
    I too have seen 100% silicone degrade from the exposure. Usually takes about two years depending on orientation to the sun and the surface it is on, darker makes it fail sooner. A gutter company in town uses Storm Blaster (white lightning brand?)purchased from Sherwin Williams for all of their gutter work, it is a urethane type sealant similar to lexel. Gutters can be very hard to seal long term.

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