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Thread: Winter battery storage

  1. #1

    Default Winter battery storage

    I'm looking for some advice for marine batteries that is specific to the winter temperatures in the South central region. I have three batteries in my boat. Two flooded for starters and one AGM for house. Last winter all three were flood types and I just left them in the boat over the winter stored outside. They seemed to be fine this year after giving them a fresh charge in spring. I ended up replacing the house battery with an AGM this season.
    What's the best practice for battery storage in our area? Do you guys bring them in the garage? Trickle charge? The flooded ones are cheap but I would like to do what I can to make the AGM last a while.

  2. #2
    Member c6 batmobile's Avatar
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    AGM isn't supposed to freeze. I still take mine out and put it on a shelf in the garage. Dont set it on the floor as the concrete draws batteries down overtime.
    Makin fur fins and feathers fly.

  3. #3
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    We pull them into the shop and hit 'em with a trickle charge once a month or so. I heard the modern batteries are not affected by storing on concrete anymore, but I store mine in the battery box on a piece of wood in the corner of the shop.
    I have friends that leave them in the boat year round.....who knows?!
    BK

  4. #4
    Charterboat Operator
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    disonnect them, leave in the boat, and hook them up to a battery tender, they are cheap insurance.

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    I bring them in the garage, give them a full charge and dig them back out in the spring.

  6. #6
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    Into the garage with a trickle charge over the winter and they will not freeze as long as they have a charge. Leaving them in the boat to drain is never good on the battery.

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  7. #7
    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Storing a battery on concrete will not result on any more of a discharge or damage than storing it on wood. Now if this was 50 years ago, that's a different story....

  8. #8

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    My boat is stored outside and I plug it into shore power all winter. The charger maintains a float charge and I check the water in the batteries (4 golf cart house batteries, and 2 gp 27 start batteries) about once a month. Checking the water is important. I just replaced the golf cart batteries this year after 6 years and the start batteries are still going strong.
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  9. #9
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    My suggestion is to leave the batteries in the boat and remove the negative battery terminal to stop any parasitic drain.
    Clean the tops of the batteries with fresh water and baking soda.
    Charge the batteries with a three stage charger. You have two difference type battery make sure the setting are set correctly for each battery type.
    After a 24 hour charge remove the charger, wait 24 hours after 24 hour check the voltage it should be >12.6v for a 100% charge.

    If you remove the batteries and when you go to rewire them you could put the wires on the wrong terminal, this happen to several people each year and battery are heavy.
    A battery will freeze if not fully charged, removing the negative terminal will guaranty it stay charged.
    In Alaska the winter are cold and self discharge slows down when it's cold so there no reason to recharge a battery as long as you remove the negative terminal. Why do I keep saying to remove the negative terminal? If you remove the positive terminal first and the tool touches metal you will wish you had remove the negative first.

  10. #10
    Member Rob B's Avatar
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    I leave mine in the boat as well. I have an onboard charger that I plug in every once in a while. Plus with the batteries still in the boat, I can crank up the Espar and relax with a beer the radio on and explore on the GPS.
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  11. #11
    Member Music Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    My suggestion is to leave the batteries in the boat and remove the negative battery terminal to stop any parasitic drain.
    Clean the tops of the batteries with fresh water and baking soda.
    Charge the batteries with a three stage charger. You have two difference type battery make sure the setting are set correctly for each battery type.
    After a 24 hour charge remove the charger, wait 24 hours after 24 hour check the voltage it should be >12.6v for a 100% charge.

    If you remove the batteries and when you go to rewire them you could put the wires on the wrong terminal, this happen to several people each year and battery are heavy.
    A battery will freeze if not fully charged, removing the negative terminal will guaranty it stay charged.
    In Alaska the winter are cold and self discharge slows down when it's cold so there no reason to recharge a battery as long as you remove the negative terminal. Why do I keep saying to remove the negative terminal? If you remove the positive terminal first and the tool touches metal you will wish you had remove the negative first.
    +1 Good advice!
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  12. #12

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    Thanks for all the tips. I guess it's a little bit of a drifting vs anchoring for halibut type question. I'm leaning towards leaving them in the boat. I'll have the ability to charge them if needed.

  13. #13
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
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    pair of 8D's in my boat unhook the neg cable and i use a battery tender on them all winter, WAY to heavy to take out of the boat.

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