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Thread: 80% AR-15 lowers need access to a drill jig

  1. #1

    Default 80% AR-15 lowers need access to a drill jig

    Do you have a jig for finishing AR-15 lowers that are only 80% complete........???

  2. #2
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Yup, itís called a mill . . . but if I do it I got to log them and get a 4473 from you. Not all jigs work with all 80%s, different guys leave different things unfinished so you need the right one for your receivers. If only doing one you can get by with a good drill press, drill vice, and an assortment of files. Or even just a Dremmel. This I think is the best most versatile jig out there, they show you how there too.

    http://www.cncguns.com/tooling.html
    Andy
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  3. #3

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    I wonder why they call it a mill.......Looks like a jig ??

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    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    That is a jig in the link. What I was saying is I have a milling machine (a mill) so I donít need a jig. Just clamp it in my mill and machine it out.
     
    I have thought about buying that jig to use in my mill, fairly cheap and it would make it easer to clamp onto them. So, if you buy that jig and want to sell at a slightly used discount after your done we could see if we can agree on a price that saves us both a bit.
    Andy
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    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    By the way I have 50 raw forgings that just came in (ordered almost a year ago) if you want to try a 0%. Only hard part to turning a forging into a working receiver is the magazine well corners, lots of file work in the corners without a brooch. They are sitting on a shelf in Phoenix till I decide if I'm going to 100% machine them here or have my brother down there 80% them on his CNC for me.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
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  6. #6

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    Thanks for the info. even as I am a Journeyman Machinist & helped build some of the first CNC machines back in the 60's, this seems like too much effort for the joy of having a non serial numbered firearm.

  7. #7

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    This is the jig I was considering: http://www.desertwarriorproducts.com...custom-jig-kit

    This is the 80% receiver I was considering: http://www.desertwarriorproducts.com...lower-receiver

  8. #8
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    That one isnít mil-spec and billet, not from a forging.
    Better and cheaper.
    http://www.m4broker.com/80-striped-lower-receiver-Givati-Company-Usa_p_462.html
    It isnít that hard at all to hog out the fire control pocket, tolerances are not critical in there. The tricky thing on an 80% is getting the pin holes true and where they belong.
     
    I learned machining on a huge old CNC mill that used punch cards. It was a great machine but it would eat your lunch if you werenít on your toes every second . . . No built in safeties at all so if you told it to -Z rapid to the earthís core by mistake it would give it the old collage try!!!

     
    Andy
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  9. #9

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    We (FARREL CORPORATION) at that time built the largest machine tools in the world. They sent me to RIT to learn to write the programs. We ladies would type info. onto the punch cards, we would feed those through a computer the size of Anchorage and it produced a white paper tape to move the head, but the operator had to change the tool & set the start point. The biggest problem was that the 1" wide paper tape would get coolant oil on it.

    We built Engine Lathes with 200' long beds (for gun Barrels), Turret Lathes that could chuck 72" dia. rams. We built the four story high machining centers for Babcock-Wilcox & Westinghouse used for the nuclear reactors. They were both Horizontal & Vertical mills in one unit, I think they were 60' in dia.. After Governor Nelson Rockefeller signed my Journeyman Papers I quit and moved to Alaska.



    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
     
    I learned machining on a huge old CNC mill that used punch cards. It was a great machine but it would eat your lunch if you werenít on your toes every second . . . No built in safeties at all so if you told it to -Z rapid to the earthís core by mistake it would give it the old collage try!!!

     

  10. #10
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    We never used the tape, used the cards to download the program onto the school bus sized vacuum tube computer that had about the computing power of a 99 cent store watch. We used the thing to hog tail hooks, missile housings, sub hatches and other stuff for the Navy. It was one potent beast turning a 3Ē face mill turned by a 25 horse 3 phase, I still have scars from the red hot dime and nickel size chips it tossed 20 feet in all directions.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
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