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Thread: Knik River Float

  1. #1

    Default Knik River Float

    Hello everyone. I was thinking about floating Knik River from the Old Glenn Highway bridge just South of Butte, down to the (New) Glenn Highway bridge to look for some moose. I thought it might be a nice change of pace away from all the crowds and ATVs and an opportunity to look for some moose. Anybody ever tried it before? I was just looking for some advice on channel selection and any hazards I should avoid etc. I know it is pretty braided. On the map it looks like the far left braid is safer and then it splits about mid-river and the main channel veers off to the right, stays off to the right for a few miles and then veers back to the left just before the bridge. Is this the best route to take, or would I be safe to stay all the way to the right until the very end when the right channel joins back with the main channel just before the bridge. Thanks to anyone with advice.

  2. #2
    Member power drifter's Avatar
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    You can go farther up the road for a bit longer float. Just need to look for the drive ways back to the river. From what I've heard you want to time the tide right or you might have some extra rowing to get to the bridge. It should have good water from the rains as this time of year it can be getting low. Just go with the flow.

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    Member scott_rn's Avatar
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    At the risk of sounding rude, I think it's a bad idea. Atvs cruise the north side, motorhomes parked up the bank. Halfway down you've got the tailrace and all the traffic it gets.

    I did it as a float a few years ago, and it flows very slow. I think it took close to four hours, and yes, the tide tries to push you back upstream.

    That said, you could find a moose just about anywhere. You might get lucky.
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    There is a bunch of Eklutna Native land & islands along the northern side in that stretch, closed to the public. Get a land status map.

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    never floated it but run it often in my airboat. i would just stay along the east shore and enjoy the trip. there will be places where leads from the matanuska intertwine with leads from the knik, just follow the main river until you get to know it. not much to worry about as far as sweepers, debris, etc, can see far enough ahead with no problem. i've seen moose along the shore a number of times. water is deep and about 8 mph, wear life jackets, silt can drown you if you go in. yes, tide brings up the water lever a bit towards the lower bridge, but does not cause the water to flow south at all, the current will take you without paddleing ,except for positioning yourself in the river. have fun. Bud
    Wasilla

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jomama View Post
    There is a bunch of Eklutna Native land & islands along the northern side in that stretch, closed to the public. Get a land status map.
    If a land owner does not want people on there land it is there responsibly to put up the proper signs with the proper contact information.

    Not the responsibly of the person.

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    Member Tearbear's Avatar
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    I think it's the hunters responsibility to know who owns the land where they are planning to hunt, and if it is privately owned, get permission from the land owner before hunting. Not all land is open to the public...page 8 in the hunting regs.
    "Grin and Bear It"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tearbear View Post
    I think it's the hunters responsibility to know who owns the land where they are planning to hunt, and if it is privately owned, get permission from the land owner before hunting. Not all land is open to the public...page 8 in the hunting regs.
    Read the state regulation on trespassing. It is the responsibly of the land owner to have proper signs.

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    Member Tearbear's Avatar
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    Yet in the case of very large tracts of private land, it might be impractical to post hundreds of miles of land...in most cases the signs are just ignored anyway.
    "Grin and Bear It"

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    What a terrible attitude to have about others private property....

    And tell that to Jeff King....

    "During the trial, King and Angstman argued that the boundary along the northeast edge of the park where King was hunting was poorly marked and that the park boundary was difficult to find on the park service's Web site.

    But as a responsible hunter, it was up to King to know where the park boundary was located, whether it was marked or not, Roberts said."



    And from page 8 of the current hunting reg book "Use of private lands without the landowner's permission, other than those legally reserved for public access easement, is trespassing"

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    Member Tearbear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jomama View Post
    ...What a terrible attitude to have about others private property....
    I agree...
    "Grin and Bear It"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tearbear View Post
    Yet in the case of very large tracts of private land, it might be impractical to post hundreds of miles of land...in most cases the signs are just ignored anyway.
    If I ever get a speeding ticket I will have to tell the judge it not practical for me to know every law ..... in most cases people will just ignored anyway. LOL

    I have tried several time to get information from several native corp and they refuse to give me details information on there land and that bull ****. By not say exactly where there land is they they can say anything they want.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    I have tried several time to get information from several native corp and they refuse to give me details information on there land and that bull ****. By not say exactly where there land is they they can say anything they want.
    There is a lot of information available online:
    http://www.ahtna-inc.com/ldm.html
    http://www.doyon.com/lands/lands_overview.aspx
    http://www.ciri.com/content/community/land.aspx
    http://www.eklutnainc.com/index.php?...d=25&Itemid=29
    http://www.bbnc.net/index.php/our-land/maps
    "Your papers are not in order"

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    Member Tearbear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    ...I have tried several time to get information from several native corp and they refuse to give me details information on there land and that bull ****. By not say exactly where there land is they they can say anything they want.
    Then maybe you should just stick to the public access areas. How in the world would it be practical or even possible for someone to post signs on 'millions' of acres of private property?
    "Grin and Bear It"

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    You don't even have to go to the native corps directly to get land status, as the originator of all conveyances are the Feds, the BLM has generally accurate land status maps that depict whats been conveyed to the Native Corps. There is an online land status mapper (SDMS) as well as the BLM public info center (as with everything there are exceptions and the map data is not perfect). There are multiple sources of land status info available; Fed, State, and individual Native Corps.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jomama View Post
    What a terrible attitude to have about others private property....

    "[/I]
    What about the rights of other people using the land they have the legal right to!!!!!!

    It's impossible to get a native corp to tell you where there are legal trail crossing there land why is that? Much where there land is.

    Here your chance to post maps of the location of all Ekluna native land not the internet maps that are so small and impossible to read. WHY IS THAT?????? If you really want people to not trespass on your land post detail maps of your land.

    Unless your afraid for people to know the truth.

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    Member Tearbear's Avatar
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    Just download the pdf map and it gets much larger.
    "Grin and Bear It"

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    Its not their responsibility to mark 17b trails. There is plenty of accurate info out there, the burden is on you to find it. There are better sources than the Native Corps themselves.

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    If a land owner does not want people on there land it is there responsibly to put up the proper signs with the proper contact information.

    Not the responsibly of the person.
    How does that apply to other access...like fly-ins? Is the land owner expected to post every 50 feet of every pond/small lake and gravel ridge out there?

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    Supporting Member sigabrt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jomama View Post
    Its not their responsibility to mark 17b trails. There is plenty of accurate info out there, the burden is on you to find it. There are better sources than the Native Corps themselves.
    Looking for easements (17b) across private land? Look here: http://sdms.ak.blm.gov/scanned_images/esmtindex.html
    "Your papers are not in order"

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