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Thread: What kind of rest do you use?

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    Default What kind of rest do you use?

    Curious...looking for opinions. How do you shoot at game at ranges over 100 yards? Offhand? Do you use a bipod? How about shooting sticks? And if so...monopod, bipod, or tripod? Or do you simply try to get prone and shoot off your backpack? Just returned from my first antelope hunt where I took my bipod but quickly discovered I couldn't see over the sage with it so I borrowed a pair of tripod shooting sticks. I was much steadier sitting than I was standing.

    Thanks in advance

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Nearest tree, backpack, rock, the bow of the boat, whatever is available. When hiking in mtns or tundra we'll use our walking sticks as a mono or bipod. Sometimes nothing as the situation dictates speed to respond in order to get a shot off.
    Practice is crucial to success.
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    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    I learned to use a sling many years ago. They seem to be a mystery to most shooters these days.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Stand the backpack up and shoot off the top of the frame from a sitting or kneeling position. Spotting scope tripod with the scope attached (rotate the scope and shoot off the vee between the handle and scope). I don't like monopods or bipods much; they wobble. Shooting off of someone's shoulder can work, but it can be tricky.

    Get as close as you can and always shoot off a rest. In guiding, most of our kills were under a hundred yards, and were off of rests.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    My youngest boy shot his first caribou off of my back when I was on my hands and knees. Probably not the best, but it's what we had, and it's fast to deploy!

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    My youngest boy shot his first caribou off of my back when I was on my hands and knees. Probably not the best, but it's what we had, and it's fast to deploy!
    As bkmail said above as well......whatever is available...

    Last year a buddy and I were at a fast uphill clip towards a blackie when I realized I needed to take the shot right then. We both were breathing real hard and there were no rests available. So my buddy says "here" and just stands up his rifle vertical, butt on the ground, and I grabbed the barrel and rested mine on my hand where I was holding the barrel of his rifle. It was still a bit wobbly but better than nothing and it worked. To tell you the truth I'm still surprised I could hit anything at a couple hundred yards the way I was breathing so hard......lol
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by gunbugs View Post
    I learned to use a sling many years ago. They seem to be a mystery to most shooters these days.
    Yup...........

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nitroman View Post
    Yup...........

    Turner Saddlery are the finest made.
    http://www.mcssl.com/store/turnersad...5186467b9ebc8b
    Sling here too, for offhand as well as lots of guys can manage from field rests.

    Being a geezer I started using a bamboo walking staff on hilly hunts a few years back. Cut 6'4" like me. Turns out to be the darnedest shooting rest around, especially when used with a sling. Scary groups at surprising ranges. Two legs and the staff make a "tripod" to take out the last bit of wobble with the sling. Good for sitting or kneeling too, because you can grab it anywhere along it's length and use it the same way.

    No moving parts, no joints to fail, nothing to attach to the rifle, cheap (or free- I found mine on the beach), and good for the knees. Can't beat it.

  9. #9

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    I bought a replacement tent pole at Wal-Mart for about 6 bucks. It was shock corded together and I cut the cord in the middle and tied the cord back together. I then lashed the poles back together about 4 inches from one end. The father you spread them apart the lower they get to shoot from different positions. They are still two pieces and will fold up so as to go in a pack. Just hold them by the end that is lashed together and they will snap together when the other end falls down straight. They work great as shooting sticks and work fair as a walking stick.

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    I have and use a set of Stoney point shooting sticks, they are light, compact, and easy to use. I also implement any readily available rest, pack, tree, or rock. My last two long range shot were made while resting on large rocky outcrops.

    For my 10yr old I took two 5/8 hardwood dowels and bound them with several pieces of bungy cord tied in constrictor knots, while spread out the make a good walking stick, slide them to the top to make a bipod. It's tall enough for him to shoot standing.

  11. #11

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    I understand how it is hunting on sage flats. No trees, rocks, etc, and the sage is sometimes too tall for bi-pods. Once I was able to find a good size bush and put my day pack on top and lay in the bush. It boils down to either shooting offhand or bringing a tripod or shooting sticks. This year I'll have a bi-pod for the range finder and shooting off of.
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    Member schmidty_dog's Avatar
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    I use a Bog Pod red legged devil that my in laws got me for Christmas. The top swivels, the legs are twist loose and then you extend to whatever length you want and then twist tight. They have painted increments just like a yardstick or ruler, so its real easy to practice and figure out your perfect setting and set them quick to it. I usually leave mine extended while moving and use them as a walking stick. The legs sprawl out to what looks like exactly 45 degree angle, very solid. They come with rubber feet that can be screwed off for a sharper foot hold if you want that. I am happy with them, used them to make a long shot on a doe last winter across a wheat field.

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    If possible I always want a rest, sling is a decent option also if you learn to handle it. For many years I have carried a walking stick a beaver made for me and besides being a decent rest option it has kept my butt from falling down or twisting a knee or ankle many times...I bought a three legged Bog Pod and it works OK but is a bit much to lug around. No matter the situation if my sights are not steady I pass the shot.
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    Member stevelyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gunbugs View Post
    I learned to use a sling many years ago. They seem to be a mystery to most shooters these days.
    I nearly always wrap up in a hasty sling regardless of what position I'm shooting from.
    Now what ?

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