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Thread: Suggestions on Trout Fly Fishing Gear?

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    Default Suggestions on Trout Fly Fishing Gear?

    I've been a bait/spincaster for years and want to learn the ropes on fly fishing for rainbows. Any suggestions on rod/reel setups/gear/books/etc?

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    Whoa, what a broad question. Buy almost ANY trout fly fishing book and go from there. There must be a zillion of them. Rods and reels are a matter of preference, and like noses, everyone has one. Buy the best you can afford, and fish wet with something like a Woolly Booger. Big rainbows are a lot of fun. Remember that they live and spawn for around 35-years, so get comfortable with catch-and-release. A few for the table now and then won't decimate the populace though.

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    Member kenaibow fan's Avatar
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    Yeah this a loaded question for sure. I would go to a fly shop and ask a lot of questions. Start with a 5 or 6 wt rod and make sure it has a good warranty like TFO or sage depending on what you can afford. As for the reel same deal, make sure it has a warranty stay away from Walmart type stores you will end up with junk. Lots of places have sales in the fall or spring where you can get good stuff at a decent price. As for line every one has their own opinion as well but I like floating line. Have fun and in joy it fall time will become your favorite time of year!!!!!!! If you need any help or want to try it out sooner then later pm me.

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    Especially since trout is on your agenda, I strongly urge you to take a fly casting/fishing class before spending a cent on gear. Fly fishing for trout is so much different than the flop-and-jerk dance routine you see folks doing for red salmon, you want to get off on the right foot both for technique and gear. The best way to pick your trout gear is to try a variety of possibilities and learn to use it right. You'll get both in a decent class.

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    Join The Alaska Fly Fishers and go to meetings.

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    I Agree with Kenaibow fan, a 5 or 6 wt is your best bet for rainbows. Echo makes a nice setup (rod, reel, line, case) in six wt and reddington makes a nice setup in 5. Mossy's fly shop on Dimond is a good place to go ask questions, Mike and his employees are all very helpful and patient with newbees and will get you exactly what you need to catch fish along with some advice on how and where.
    Practice casting before you go out on the water and when you get frustrated (when, not if) walk away and try again later.
    This website has tons of info and helps you learn the jargon of fly fishing: http://www.flyfishingforbeginners.com/
    I have only caught a few fish on flies, so take what I say with a grain of salt, but that's what I've learned in the few months I have been doing it.
    Oh and be prepared to get addicted, because it is a blast!

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    As you will find as you get deeper into fly fishing, there are so many different things to cover. My first suggestion is to not spend too much on your first setup. I've known guys who went out and bought a $700 Sage rod with a $300 Ross reel and used it twice before deciding it took too much practice to become proficient. That being said, there are plenty of options which are much more affordable and catch fish just as well as any expensive setup. I also highly recommend for beginners to get a slow- to medium-action rod. A lot of guys will be recommended by well-meaning sales associates to pick up a fast-action rod because you can really power out a lot of line, but your timing and technique must be precise. A softer rod is much more forgiving of a novice's timing and can make learning and improving casting technique while actually fishing less frustrating. At a lower price-point I recommend the Redington Classic Trout as a good slowish/medium action rod that won't break the bank. I personally love 5wt, but a 6 works just fine as well. You can get away with a cheaper reel when you're starting out, just be careful not to get them wet as the cork drag systems in cheaper reels tend to expand and tighten up real bad after a dunk in the river. As far as terminal tackle goes: beads, egg patterns, and flesh baits are working most places right now that aren't blown out by the rain. Baitfish patterns will become more productive as the salmon eggs become less available and the fish become hungry; my go-to is always a Dolly Llama, but they are extremely heavy and difficult to cast for new fly-fishers. Anyways, that's my 2 cents, good luck and tight lines!

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    Very good refinements beyond simple line weight, Seabass. Hope he follows your pointers. One thing I'll add that's a further departure from current fast action fashion. Consider a double taper line on that slower rod. Weight forward lines can be frustrating on slow rods, while DTs bring out their best. I'd also stay faaaaaaaaaaaar away from sink tip or sinking fly lines when you're learning to cast. Talk about a millstone around your neck!

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    I agree with BrownBear. Double Taper (DT) lines are very effective on medium action rods, and would be my recommendation to use while fishing rivers like the Kenai. The reason I suggest a DT line; because most of the time you are utilizing a Roll cast (One of the easiest casts to learn, and master). However, if you go with a standard Weight Forward (WF) line, you will do just fine. I will also throw out my recommendation for Mossy's fly shop, to talk to, and ask questions, regarding your new addiction.

    When starting out, the rod and reel choice does not really matter. Don't break the bank because you want the very best! A fish will not strike a fly just because you presented it from an $800 Sage. Starting out, I would look at a rod in the $100-$200 range with a great warranty. A reel should be what you really focus your money on. A good reel can get moved from rod-to-rod, and will last forever when taken care of. Also, consider getting another spool for your reel, so that you can change out line weights, or different types of lines quickly. It will also allow you to feel two different types of lines on your rod, and how each of them cast.

    AKTroutGuy

  10. #10

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    Scott Radian 10' 6wt rod, Hatch 5Plus Finatic reel, with Scientific Angler Textured Nymphing Indicator line, and never look back!
    Piscor Ergo Sum

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    I think the Classic Trout is a great recommendation. You'll really be able to feel the rod load, it doesn't break the bank, and it's got a lifetime warranty.
    Mushing Tech: squeezing the romance out of dog mushing one post at a time

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    I would also agree with previous posters about not spending too much $$ on your first setup. Start with something moderately priced that's not junk and see how you like it. Most of the major rod manufacturers have fairly inexpensive starter outfits. If you really like it you can always upgrade later and then you'll have a backup/loaner. WARNING! Flyfishing can become extremely addictive.
    I am no longer surprised at what I am no longer surprised at ---Bill Whittle

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    Member kenaibow fan's Avatar
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    Danner is selling nice sage rods on here pretty cheap

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    Member Seabass417's Avatar
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    My first fly rod was a Redington RS4 5wt two-piece that I paid $60 for in a Cabela's bargain cave and it is still my favorite rod years later after trying multiple rods of much higher price points. I started with the cheapest piece of garbage reel I could find (a $15 bargain cave plastic reel/line combo) and worked my way up from there. I will say that the first $100+ reel I bought was a revelation, but those cheap-o reels caught just as many fish.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Franken Fish View Post
    Scott Radian 10' 6wt rod, Hatch 5Plus Finatic reel, with Scientific Angler Textured Nymphing Indicator line, and never look back!


    This would be suggesting the top of the line gear to purchase!

    AKTroutGuy

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    Quote Originally Posted by kenaibow fan View Post
    Danner is selling nice sage rods on here pretty cheap
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...-rods-for-sale

    If you are seriously wanting to start, and have quality gear, pick-up that 6wt rod for that price!

    AKTroutGuy

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    I'm new to fly fishing myself but thought I'd throw this out. My first to rods and reels came from Allen Fly Fishing. Smaller company but seems to be very well known in the lower 48. Their products are top notch without breaking the bank and so far their customer service and warranties have been great. If you go to their website make sure you sign p for their newsletter. They don't spam you but they have "deals of the week" and sometimes "deals of the day" with incredible prices.

    Also, I don't know if I can mention it here, so I won't at this time, but I joined a very large forum dedicated to fly fishing and have learned tons of info about the hobby. It is what the Outdoors Directory is to Alaska what this said forum is to fly fishing. If it is OK, I will post a link to the site. By the way this site has lots of AK FF'man on it that can help you along the way.

    And no, I am not affiliated in any way with the aforementioned sites. I just like to pass along info that has been helpful to me in thepast.

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