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Thread: You have got to be kidding me!!

  1. #1
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    Angry You have got to be kidding me!!

    You have got to be Kidding me.............NO FOUL-PLAY how can it not be not foul-play??????????

    WAIT I KNOW WALRUSES ARE NOT BIRDS THERE FOR IT CAN NOT BE ANY FOUL PLAY!!!!!!!!!



    http://www.alaskadispatch.com/articl...-not-suspected

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    we found 7 one year at cape Pierce.. all with heads... shoot, sink recover later. Some get away I guess. Maybe the heads just fall off sometimes...lol

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    Member Queen of Kings's Avatar
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    Not that I would beleive it for a minute: but suppose they died naturaly, were found on shore, head removed (leagle) and the tide took them back to seas and then back to shore again :-)
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    All the years living in Kotz we would see a headless Walrus every summer on the beach. You never know...maybe it lost its head in a card game?

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    So they said it was legal to collect the heads...even if you are non-Native. Didn't know that till now, I don't think you would be allowed to sell them.
    "Grin and Bear It"

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    When living in Dillingham it was very common for dead walrus to wash up on beaches, especially in the Cape Pierce area. Though walrus washed up with heads, they didn't keep them very long. A number of people would fly the beaches in cubs on a regular basis, looking for walrus recently washed up with heads/tusks still intact. Dead walrus on the beach very quickly lost their heads or tusks. Native or non-Native people could keep the tusks from the dead walrus as long as they had them sealed by Fish and Wildlife.

    The article appears to assume that the walrus were beheaded before washing up dead. That is a huge assumption which is unlikely. Walrus tend to bloat and wash to shore after dying, and have a fierce smell, so determining a cause of death would be very difficult.

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    Member Gr is for Greg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tearbear View Post
    So they said it was legal to collect the heads...even if you are non-Native. Didn't know that till now, I don't think you would be allowed to sell them.
    Yeah, that portion of the article surprised me. I actually know someone who found a dead rotting walrus and took the skull secretly. He has it at his house, but he thinks that he could get in trouble for it. Can you really cut the head off a dead walrus? I found a dead and rotting beluga whale on the Anchorage Flats while duck hunting one year. I wanted to save its skull, but figured the feds would swoop in with helicopters and take me to Guantanamo as soon as I touched it.
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    They had a dead floater on deadliest catch this year
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    At the next sportsmans show or boat show, go talk to the Feds and NOAA... you would be surprised to know what you can keep. They told me if I find a wale and want to keep it, just take it and call them, they will seal it and I am good to go... but it all depends on what type of animal and who has the jurisdiction.
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    It used to be that one could harvest and keep a dead walrus head - - - with ivory. It could not be shipped nor sold unless it had been in some fashion changed from raw to artsy-crafty ivory. That is, scrimshawed, engraved, or otherwise modified.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gr is for Greg View Post
    Yeah, that portion of the article surprised me. I actually know someone who found a dead rotting walrus and took the skull secretly. He has it at his house, but he thinks that he could get in trouble for it. Can you really cut the head off a dead walrus? I found a dead and rotting beluga whale on the Anchorage Flats while duck hunting one year. I wanted to save its skull, but figured the feds would swoop in with helicopters and take me to Guantanamo as soon as I touched it.
    It's amazing what you find when you look. Check out these pages for all the info everyone is asking about.

    http://www.fws.gov/alaska/fisheries/..._you_ivory.pdf
    http://www.fws.gov/alaska/fisheries/...ry_do_dont.pdf
    http://www.fws.gov/alaska/fisheries/...unting2010.pdf

    And here's the page with more links to questions about marine mammal parts and hunting.
    http://www.fws.gov/alaska/fisheries/...rp/reports.htm
    http://www.fws.gov/alaska/fisheries/...HFOUND2010.pdf

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    EVERY Walrus loses its head. Every one. Every Walrus Dies, Every Walrus Floats, every Walrus hits the beach stinkin' and each and every one of them losses its head.....It's kind of a 'race' to get to them before they hitthe beach and guys with super cubs spot them.....

    If you are smart, at least sorta smart and well enough equipped, you can wait out in the thinning icepack as the "Stinkers" that had died during the winter and were freed from the ice, or the fresher ones that dove when hit and often unretrivable.

    The ones in Kotzebue Sound come up and in with the tides, from Cape Prince of Whales, Russia, Nome St.Lawerence island and such, as we often find a tag or bouy on the harpoon line, if they were harpooned, we take the tusks or heads off with saws, as well as the harpoon heads The Stinkers are so foul and rotten, most do a quick and dirty saw, rather than chop whilst the ones that hit the beach will lose their heads and often their flippers. A course hand saw and box cutters are great for such pukeable work

    When your cruizing around you look for the circling birds. When they have a heavy set of tusks, the back flippers are usually up , with perched birds. Bloated carcasses are often on their sides, so ya gotta check, and smell....ewwwwwwwwwwwww.........

    Most often, the wash ups are either naturally dead animals (everything dies) or ones "That got away" as they dive to unretrivable depths if not shot perfectly. I would venture that 1 outta 5 Seals, Whales or Walrus get away wounded. On land, a second shot is easy, even a persuit, but finding and pulling up a carcass isnt always doable, often due to depth or ice above on the surface. Fishfinders help, but not always. Thats why Whalers have "strikes" counted in their tally rather than Kills.

    Walrus migrate in herds, and when they are there, they are hunted, as the hunts only last a matter of days.During this time many Walrus are caught, as the breaking ice streams north in Springtime, and our oceans clear up this way. Many but not most are sunk, a natural result of hunting in the Ocean. If 30 were caught by a village they were pasing by, all on the same day, seeing 5-7 walrus wash up in a close proximity would be normal.
    Waiting 3-5 days for a Walrus Carcass to float up is a not a good gamble, as currents and natural boyancy have those carcasses moving pretty far, especcially after they bloat up.

    We work any share of meats and fats we get into oil and preserved 1/2 dryed and frozen, then bury the heads for the summer to rot the meat off the bones and pull the Ivory out , as boiling the Ivory and bnes makes stress cracks that will eventually ruin them. In fall time, dig 'em up and do whatever.....and make Xmas $$

    Then theres the poached ones, as human greed takes its course, but in most all places where the hunting takes place, people are met at the boat, its hard to hide unloading a boat, and most all are compliant. Besides, bringing home a Walrus is a very valuable comodity, nothin worth wasteing at all.

    Also, the ice isnt over the shallower Bering sea, its retreating farther north, where there is deeper water and very few islands, and the Russian side is getting over worked, so soon enough, Im thinking Pacific walrus numbers are gonna bottom out. The Canadian Archepelligo is a safe haven in summer for walrus and Polar Bears, but its not Alaska.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JR2 View Post
    They told me if I find a wale and want to keep it, just take it and call them,
    What's a "wale"...???
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    What's a "wale"...???
    You know what I meant there Mr. Spelling Police.


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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    What's a "wale"...???
    Similar to..."spending five moths on a boat"....
    "Grin and Bear It"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tearbear View Post
    So they said it was legal to collect the heads...even if you are non-Native. Didn't know that till now, I don't think you would be allowed to sell them.

    not sure what the regs are today.. when we collected the 7 heads all we needed to do was take them into F and G and get numbers inscribed.. and could not sell them,, of course. We didn't know all the details at the time, but did bury them on an island till fishing was done.. then there was a wind storm, and we spent a long time re finding them..lol But it was completely legal.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Grizzly 2 View Post
    It used to be that one could harvest and keep a dead walrus head - - - with ivory. It could not be shipped nor sold unless it had been in some fashion changed from raw to artsy-crafty ivory. That is, scrimshawed, engraved, or otherwise modified.
    its still the case...IF you are non-Alaskan Native, you are not allowed to buy or sell raw ivory but you are allowed to purchase scrimshawed ivory or like you mentioned, "modified". There are ALOT of regs ins regards to this. I interned with USFWS a couple years ago and learned quite a bit in regards to walrus, polar bear, sea otter and whale (and even narwhal) regulations.
    I do know that there were a couple of times that non-native people would bring sea otter carcasseses or whale parts (and a bunch of other marine mammals protected by the MMPA) to get sealed and registered.

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    Member AK-HUNT's Avatar
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    Saw close to two dozen between Barrow and Wainwright village headless on the beach. Appeared zero meat salvaged.
    Ask some of the pilots that fly there regularly and they'll tell you its common. My friends who fly up that way say so anyway.

    They believe the technique is: Shootem in the nugget, they wash up on the beach in a day and you grabem'.....or they float and you get it at once.

    Disgusting.

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    And EVERY Walrus that ends op on the beach loses its head. EVERY Walrus Dies, of every cause.

    Just because they are dead dosent mean they were poached. They are one of the few carcass's so big that they almost always end up on the beach, or locked inthe ice untill they float to shore.

    A dead sunk walrus takes 3-5 days to bloat up, a wounded one can get much farther away. It happens, thats Ocean hunting, baecause yo cannot persue an animal that dives thousands of feet below the water..

    Then theres greed and people wasteing left and right, all over the state, certainly, but not every wash up is some head hunters victem.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    ADF&G says about 40% of walruses shot are lost. But the shooters don't care, because they know that they will wash up a week later or so. They mostly just want the tusks, anyway.

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