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Thread: Black Box, pro troll etc

  1. #1
    Member sisusuomi's Avatar
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    Default Black Box, pro troll etc

    Anyone here use something like this? Never crossed my mind to be checking my boat voltage in surrounding waters. What's the general consensus on this sort of thing? Any other things to do other than this is you're an aluminum boat owner?Or is this a bunch of baloney.

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    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    I can tell when my fiberglass boat needs new zincs by how well our boat fishes. We catch a lot of fish. I bought the black box from Cabelas about ten years ago and the readings for out boat with out it were correct. The black box for us only got used once when we had to correct the voltage when it was off (due to worn out zincs). At the time we had a few neighbors with hot boats at the harbor and we were going through out boat's zincs extra fast.

    I had a brand new Hewescraft OceanPro that didn't catch fish any where near as good as our old fiberglass Uniflite and its was beacuse the voltage was way off.

    So the black boxes do work, but you don't need one if your boat is set up properly (mine has been in the attic for maybe 7 years now), and aluminum boats do require more attention and setup regarding voltage.

    Sobie2

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    Member sisusuomi's Avatar
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    Sobie2, how does one set up an aluminum boat for voltage? Put a tester on the neg battery terminal and stick a rod in the surrounding water with the positive lead touching it? That is one guess, could be totally off but...

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    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    The black boxes come with a book. Remembering off the top of my head, you are close. It is touch one lead of the tester on a battery terminal and the other to your stainless steel downrigger wire in the water... I don't know how this changes with the use of braided down rigger wire (as a matter of fact the cannon down riggers will not do the auto stop thing if you use braid). The scotty's use a little green thing on the cable to stop it.

    I don't remember if it is negative to battery or positive though. IF your numbers are off check make sure all things are gounded/bonded to the hull.

    Sobie2

  5. #5

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    Get out of the harbor , put your downrigger ball in the water and touch the positive lead to the downrigger wire and the negative lead to the boat or battery and check the voltage . Should be a positive reading. If you have Canons the reading probably will be around +.5 volts. The book says about .6 for kings and .65 for silvers. But like Sobie says if your zincs are good and you don't have a partial ground some where your readings should be ok. And if you are running braid you won't have any reading.

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    What your doing sounds like the same test you would do if you were testing the zincs except you would use a silver haft cell as a reference. If you use a vom on the low DC voltage scale I will bet you will get the same reading. Let us know what happens.

  7. #7

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    I think there is a lot of factors in determining how many kings hit the deck in a particular boat. Only you know how well your boat fishes, based on your previous ability to catch kings. Put a novice in a great catching boat, and they'll go nuts trying to get the boat to "fish", when really they need to be learning the fundamentals to effective king trolling. I'd guesstimate that 95% it's a fisherman problem, and 5% of the time it's a voltage issue.

    I know a lot of lowliners, who make excuses that the highliners boats fish "really well", and that's they they catch 2-3x more kings than they do.. Well, it' ain't the boat..(grin)

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    Member redleader's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    I think there is a lot of factors in determining how many kings hit the deck in a particular boat. Only you know how well your boat fishes, based on your previous ability to catch kings. Put a novice in a great catching boat, and they'll go nuts trying to get the boat to "fish", when really they need to be learning the fundamentals to effective king trolling. I'd guesstimate that 95% it's a fisherman problem, and 5% of the time it's a voltage issue.

    I know a lot of lowliners, who make excuses that the highliners boats fish "really well", and that's they they catch 2-3x more kings than they do.. Well, it' ain't the boat..(grin)
    Yep, gotta have the voltage output just right.... No bananas and hold your mouth just right helps also,lol lol

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by redleader View Post
    Yep, gotta have the voltage output just right.... No bananas and hold your mouth just right helps also,lol lol
    All that stuff is crap....everyone knows that as long as you have on your lucky underwear, you are guaranteed to get your limit, with nothing under 40 lbs!!!!!

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