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Thread: Moose hunting strategy?

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    Default Moose hunting strategy?

    You are walking through the woods and come across several beds that look fresh. How would you hunt the area to determine if there is a bull moose around. I came up with difference methods I would use with and without a partner. I'm wondering if there a method you used and did it work?

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    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
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    If possible get up high and sit n wait.... Otherwise find the nearest water hole and.... Sit n wait



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    Late in the season, towards evening you could also try scraping and or calling....



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    I used some cow moose pee one year in an area I was calling from. When I came back the moose was about where the moose pee was. Not sure if the calling did it or the pee, or both. It did not hurt.

    I have used it since with absolutely no noticeable difference in attracting a bull moose.

    Best to be still, quite, be down wind someplace and let your glass do the walking. Call morning, and evenings. If you see moose sign, it is either a cow or a bull. They run together close to the rut, so your chances are good of seeing them both around the area with some fresh sign. Look for rubs, cows don't do that. Maybe a wallow, another bull maneuver. If you see a bunch of cows (2 or 3) MONEY there will be some bulls around. Then........

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    Sit-n-wait. Ya, that about sums it up.

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    There are plenty of threads on moose hunting techniques. Its all about timing- right now is still to early for cow calling, most bulls are out of velvet or just about out, and they are tending cows. 2 nights ago I knew a bull was in the area I was scouting, but couldn't see him when we got up the hill to where we assumed he bedded down. So I beat the hell out of some alders and threw in a few light bull grunts every once in a while. About 15 minutes later he popped out of an alder patch and we had a staredown competition. He won, but only after I concluded he was about 45 and a 2x2 brow tine. This was around 3:00 pm.

    I'm a pro-active person when it comes to hunting moose, I can't just sit next to a pile of moose turds, or a previously used bed and wonder if a bull is in the area. Know what calls to use at the right time of day and season, that is the key to making the action happen.
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    Luckily my schedule has left me free to hunt from Sept. 8 -15 most years......only see a lot of bugs before then it seems. But, I don't hunt a high density area and need to wait until the calls can save me from hiking miles or sitting until I bleed out.

    However, to the OP, if I was in that area, I'd look for outsized tracks, some scraping from velvet removal, outsized turds, outiszed beds, or a wallow....to help ascertain if there is indeed a bull.

    If I really liked it and had no other option due to date, I'd get a few hundred yards off ideally with some elevation and a view and sit it for a day and a half.....with a good book, and some sandwiches, and a bug net.

    If it's a hot bedding area, some light thrashing and soft grunts could peave any bull in the area off since he knows darn well where the cows hang at and if he here's a little competition, it might bring him out. But i wouldn't call all that aggressively.

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    Bigakstuff...Your my kind of hunter.....you know what your doing.

    When it comes to moose hunting timing is everything. When I find what appear to be fresh beds I look around and try to determine what would be the best method of hunting the area. Most times it's a crap shoot with no good option. If there a lots of moose dropping that mean they have been there for a while. The first thing I will do is stop and listens to see if I can hear any sounds like a moose eating or saying “hello”. If I do hear a moose say “hello” I will respond with what I think will work “a cow hello” is all ways a save bet but some times will not get the attention of a bull. Any call will alert any animal where you are that assuming it does not all ready know your there, so don't be aggressive.

    If there no one direction I can go I will move slowly through the area zig-zaging trying to cover the most country. If there two of you you need to spread out, it almost not possible to make noise just don't make non moose sounds.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    Any call will alert any animal where you are that assuming it does not all ready know your there, so don't be aggressive.
    In my opinion this totally has to do with timing.....

    If you call aggressively a bit too early in the season then you may cause smaller bulls to shy away. But at the right time, from my experience, the more aggressive the better....especially with big bulls. It doesn't have to be only with calls, as aggressive raking seems to really get them coming in strong. Again, this is my experience and timing has a lot to do with it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    In my opinion this totally has to do with timing.....

    If you call aggressively a bit too early in the season then you may cause smaller bulls to shy away. But at the right time, from my experience, the more aggressive the better....especially with big bulls. It doesn't have to be only with calls, as aggressive raking seems to really get them coming in strong. Again, this is my experience and timing has a lot to do with it.
    I agree with you aggressive calling and raking works on big bulls. Where I hunt I can not see the bulls until there on top of me so I don't know what is coming in or how fast. Another problem is I do not know how big or if the bull a has all ready been in a fight and if I'm being aggressive with the calling he may not come in in fear of being beat up again.

    Getting a big bull all worked up can be hazardous to YOUR HEALTH. Most times I don't see a bull until he is on top of me (under 100ft), and I have had several bull charge through the brush wanting to fight only stopping when it realized I was not a moose and I only use a bull grunt call. One time I had to drop a bull in self defense before I found out it was legal. I don't want to find out what would happen if I told a bull his father was a CARIBOU.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    I agree with you aggressive calling and raking works on big bulls. Where I hunt I can not see the bulls until there on top of me so I don't know what is coming in or how fast. Another problem is I do not know how big or if the bull a has all ready been in a fight and if I'm being aggressive with the calling he may not come in in fear of being beat up again.

    Getting a big bull all worked up can be hazardous to YOUR HEALTH. Most times I don't see a bull until he is on top of me (under 100ft), and I have had several bull charge through the brush wanting to fight only stopping when it realized I was not a moose and I only use a bull grunt call. One time I had to drop a bull in self defense before I found out it was legal. I don't want to find out what would happen if I told a bull his father was a CARIBOU.
    Sounds like a hot hunt in the jungle! I've often been able to roughly estimate the size of an animal (i.e. 36 in. vs 50 plus) by the sounds I hear when they are raking etc. Those big boys can make one heck of a racket, and often snap stuff I'd need an axe to cut. My gut is that if hear aggressive raking and calling, get aggressive back, cuz he's obviously hot. If it seems more tentative, I'd tone it down.

    All I know is that your heart must absolutely hammer if you gotta listen to them comin until they are within 50 yards before the shot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Catch It View Post
    Sounds like a hot hunt in the jungle! I've often been able to roughly estimate the size of an animal (i.e. 36 in. vs 50 plus) by the sounds I hear when they are raking etc. Those big boys can make one heck of a racket, and often snap stuff I'd need an axe to cut. My gut is that if hear aggressive raking and calling, get aggressive back, cuz he's obviously hot. If it seems more tentative, I'd tone it down.

    All I know is that your heart must absolutely hammer if you gotta listen to them comin until they are within 50 yards before the shot.
    Your so lucky.

    I've only had one bull trash the brush if they hit a tree with there antlers it a single hit. Most of the time they will come in calling and stop waiting for me to make a mistake or seek in. I hate it when they do that.

    I also had a few bulls come in making a challenge call, it only took a single bull grunt to bring them in and they came in HOT.

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