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Thread: Barometric draft regulator ?

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    Member northernalberta's Avatar
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    Default Barometric draft regulator ?

    I was thinking of buying this small, cheaper wood stove and put it in myself, running 6" double walled stainless steel flex tubing from stove to top of chimney. In the manual for the wood stove it recommends a 6" barometric draft regulator be added. What is this and how important is it?

    Thanks

  2. #2

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    More commonly thought of as a damper. I believe it is a damper that TEE's off the chimney, with a screw adjustable counter weight, as opposed to a "IN-LINE" style damper that you manually adjust.

    http://inspectapedia.com/heat/DraftRegulators.htm

    http://search.yahoo.com/search;_ylt=...fr=yfp-t-622-1

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Never heard of such a thing on a woodstove; usually they have airflow controls built into the door or the rear, plenty for a small cheap model....also never heard of "flex tubing" for a woodstove...is this a masonry chimney?
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    Member northernalberta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    Never heard of such a thing on a woodstove; usually they have airflow controls built into the door or the rear, plenty for a small cheap model....also never heard of "flex tubing" for a woodstove...is this a masonry chimney?
    I am not sure about the chimney, it's intended for an open fireplace and has a thin walled 10" aluminum liner inside that ends at the top of the chimney. I knew that installing a wood stove would require some kind of upgrade to the chimney and I asked Central Plumbing & Heating what I needed and they said they had a kit, that included 6" SS tubing for inside the chimney. It comes in 15', 20', and 25' lengths and can bend around corners, etc. So I'm paraphrasing a bit when I say flex tubing.

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    You're describing chimney liner. It's used to reduce the diameter of a too big chimney. I did it to two metalbestosestos pipes when I went to more efficient stoves. The damper is as described in the earlier post. My oil stove has one built in since there's no air control on an oil stove, just fuel control.. Wood stoves generally control air flow at the firebox.

  6. #6
    Member Yukoner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by northernalberta View Post
    I am not sure about the chimney, it's intended for an open fireplace and has a thin walled 10" aluminum liner inside that ends at the top of the chimney. I knew that installing a wood stove would require some kind of upgrade to the chimney and I asked Central Plumbing & Heating what I needed and they said they had a kit, that included 6" SS tubing for inside the chimney. It comes in 15', 20', and 25' lengths and can bend around corners, etc. So I'm paraphrasing a bit when I say flex tubing.
    For any solid fuel burning appliance, you must use an approved SS chimney liner. Z Flex is probably the most common. What stove is it that you are looking at? I've never seen any wood stove require a barometric, I'd like to see the instructions just to see.
    I'm in the building and mechanical inspection field.
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