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Thread: Tundra moose

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    Default Tundra moose

    As moose season is upon us, thought this was appropriate... Got to love Tundra.

    20130828_132659-1[1].jpg

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    Nice!

    We got in the habit of weighing quarters back in the shed so we didn't just have our aching backs to attest to what things weighed, lots of variation from moose to moose. I've carried hinds from 60 inch,massive-antlered bulls that were less than a 45 incher from the same system.

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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catch It View Post
    Nice!

    We got in the habit of weighing quarters back in the shed so we didn't just have our aching backs to attest to what things weighed, lots of variation from moose to moose. I've carried hinds from 60 inch,massive-antlered bulls that were less than a 45 incher from the same system.
    I'm interested in your observations on body size / antler size ratios. Also, how heavy was the heaviest moose quarter you guys weighed?

    Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
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    First one I ever packed was 60 inch, lots of mass, hinds were 125 lbs.....sucked, almost never went moose hunting again

    My first two were mid 30's in an any bull area, similar hinds of about 80- 85 lbs.

    High 50's, nice mass 85 lbs. (this was the wierdest one)

    60 in., tons of mass......90 lbs.
    Same year same morning....60 inch, low mass, old bull 100 lbs.

    mid 40's......85 lbs.
    same year 60 inch lots of mass, 100 lbs.

    mid 50's, nice mass, 90 lbs.

    We weighed most of these, but this is from memory. What struck me the most was that it took a monster bull to break 100 lb hind quarters and even the small racked paddle bulls had 80 plus pound butts. These were all Bristol Bay moose. When guys start talking about 150 lb quarters, i normally doubt it. I'm sure it happens in some areas but I've only been involved in two (one on list, another i helped butcher) where the hinds were truly a two man operation or it was a no go. But, they all feel like a ton on spongy tundra

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Strahan View Post
    I'm interested in your observations on body size / antler size ratios. Also, how heavy was the heaviest moose quarter you guys weighed?Mike
    What happened to the old Mike S.? How come your not worried about copyright infringement? Your making money off this forum. Did you get permission to post that copyrighted material?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catch It View Post
    First one I ever packed was 60 inch, lots of mass, hinds were 125 lbs.....sucked, almost never went moose hunting again

    My first two were mid 30's in an any bull area, similar hinds of about 80- 85 lbs.

    High 50's, nice mass 85 lbs. (this was the wierdest one)

    60 in., tons of mass......90 lbs.
    Same year same morning....60 inch, low mass, old bull 100 lbs.

    mid 40's......85 lbs.
    same year 60 inch lots of mass, 100 lbs.

    mid 50's, nice mass, 90 lbs.

    We weighed most of these, but this is from memory. What struck me the most was that it took a monster bull to break 100 lb hind quarters and even the small racked paddle bulls had 80 plus pound butts. These were all Bristol Bay moose. When guys start talking about 150 lb quarters, i normally doubt it. I'm sure it happens in some areas but I've only been involved in two (one on list, another i helped butcher) where the hinds were truly a two man operation or it was a no go. But, they all feel like a ton on spongy tundra
    We killed one out of McGrath and weighed the hindquarters on the scales at Northern Air Cargo (certified scales). They were 165# each. One of the biggest-bodied bulls I've ever seen (or had to carry). His antlers measured 60", but the palms were short and thin. Best we could tell, he was a younger bull that had not developed his full antler mass yet. We saw another bull in the same meadow, another giant, that easily topped 70" on the spread.

    I killed one way up the Nimiuktuk in GMU 23 that was comparable to the McGrath critter, but we never weighed him. He fell on his belly in the willows, right between two large hummocks and three grown men could not roll him over. We ended up splitting his hide down the spine and taking him apart that way. It was a field care nightmare. He measured 58".

    I think some of these outsized bulls are genetic anomalies. In both cases we thought the antler spreads were in the high 40's, even from 100 yards. Their bodies were so massive, they dwarfed everything else.

    I'd love to hear from others who have actually weighed moose quarters. Interesting stuff.

    Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
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    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
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    Are we talking a hindquarter cut off at the ball socket, or with the backbone split out to the third rib attached??

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    Quote Originally Posted by CapnMike View Post
    Are we talking a hindquarter cut off at the ball socket, or with the backbone split out to the third rib attached??
    I've always removed them at the ball socket, with no spine or pelvis attached. We just fillet it off the pelvis.

    Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
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    Dropped a 59" a few years back, had to pack him out on backs for about a mile or so through a swamp and muddy trail. At the time I was dog tired and felt as if though the hind quarter on my back felt rediculously heavy, a buddy traded packs with me half way out and he was hurting by the time we reached the wheelers. Out of curiosity, when we got home we weighed one of them, came in at just over 145 pounds. He was a big bodied bull, he died with his back slammed up against a tundra hump, and 3 of us could not get him rolled over to save our lives, finally had to take a hatchet and cut that tundra hump out from behind his back and dig down a little bit to roll him over. needless to say, I'll be thinking twice about the pack out before I pull the trigger again.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Strahan View Post
    We killed one out of McGrath and weighed the hindquarters on the scales at Northern Air Cargo (certified scales). They were 165# each. One of the biggest-bodied bulls I've ever seen (or had to carry). His antlers measured 60", but the palms were short and thin. Best we could tell, he was a younger bull that had not developed his full antler mass yet. We saw another bull in the same meadow, another giant, that easily topped 70" on the spread.

    I killed one way up the Nimiuktuk in GMU 23 that was comparable to the McGrath critter, but we never weighed him. He fell on his belly in the willows, right between two large hummocks and three grown men could not roll him over. We ended up splitting his hide down the spine and taking him apart that way. It was a field care nightmare. He measured 58".

    I think some of these outsized bulls are genetic anomalies. In both cases we thought the antler spreads were in the high 40's, even from 100 yards. Their bodies were so massive, they dwarfed everything else.

    I'd love to hear from others who have actually weighed moose quarters. Interesting stuff.

    Mike
    I hunted up a couple of photos of that one. The first is just your regular trophy shot; you really can't see the size of the animal and the antlers aren't all that impressive.



    The next shot is a screen grab off the video, of my partner and I with the two hindquarters in our packs.



    Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

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    I just packed a little moose out. Going in on an empty pack to get the next load you almost feel weightless! I can't imagine packing out a brute.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Strahan View Post
    I hunted up a couple of photos of that one. The first is just your regular trophy shot; you really can't see the size of the animal and the antlers aren't all that impressive.



    The next shot is a screen grab off the video, of my partner and I with the two hindquarters in our packs.



    Mike
    Mike out of curiosity why didn't you guys take the shin bone out of the Hinds. We cut them and leave the big tendon to hang them from and then follow the natural lines to the knee and take the lower bone out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Strahan View Post
    I'm interested in your observations on body size / antler size ratios. Also, how heavy was the heaviest moose quarter you guys weighed?

    Mike
    Last year I shot a 60" bull; the hindquarter I packed whole was 140, +/- 5 pounds. That's bone-in, but with the hoof and lower leg off. That includes all meat to the hip joint. After that I cut the second one down quite a bit...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bear View Post
    Mike out of curiosity why didn't you guys take the shin bone out of the Hinds. We cut them and leave the big tendon to hang them from and then follow the natural lines to the knee and take the lower bone out.
    If you're talking about the humerus, the large bone below the femur, we always leave that in the quarter. It's a requirement to meet the bone-in regulation, and it keeps better in the field anyway. The humerus is the bone with the large tendon you refer to. We discard the lower leg, which contains the radius and ulna. What you're looking at, sticking out the tops of our packs are the humerus bones on both hindquarters, in game bags.

    Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Strahan View Post
    If you're talking about the humerus, the large bone below the femur, we always leave that in the quarter. It's a requirement to meet the bone-in regulation, and it keeps better in the field anyway. The humerus is the bone with the large tendon you refer to. We discard the lower leg, which contains the radius and ulna. What you're looking at, sticking out the tops of our packs are the humerus bones on both hindquarters, in game bags.

    Mike
    interesting gonna have to check up on my bone termonology... Not sure how taking the bone below the knee is considered against the regs... I will have to look that up.. there is no deboning going on just seperating the lower leg and leaving the tendon to hang it from...

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    k i looked at the regs and I guess if i look at the pic I could be wrong but the law is no denoning in the field, but what I am talking about is just seperating into two parts NOT deboning so I may have to ask a trooper on his opinion...

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    20 years ago I took a 58 inch bull moose outside of farewell. (Not too far from McGrath) To date it is the biggest bodied moose I have ever had to Pack. The rack was symmetrical with palmated brows 3 tines on each side, average in weight and thickness in the rack, it was a younger bull. I take the hind quarters off at the ball joint like Mike. I never did weigh the hind quarters on that animal but one of the hind quarters took two of us to get out. I was young and in great shape 6'4" 230 lbs yet once it was on my back I literally could not stand up and walk we had to lash it to a pole and carry out with two people. . After the moose was down and back to camp the plane was scheduled for pick up the next day. but the pass apparently was closed, no planes were flying. The plane never showed up that day and ended up arriving 4 days late. Temperatures were in the high 70s, no wind, and never cooled at night Very stagnant air during that time frame and 100's if not thousands of flies. We fought flies for 4 straight days, we ate the tenderloins and half of a back strap during that time. After getting meat to town and cleaning up including many fly eggs and rotten meat,there was a lot of clean up! We weighed all edible deboned meat and still had 800 pounds of moose meat for the freezer. the thing was a pig with Antlers!

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    Two moose this year, one was 53 inches, two brows......hinds were 125 lbs. three days later a 63 incher, two brows....hinds were 130. Looking at the antlers was obviously a different class of bull, but tell that to my back when I was tossing around the hinds from the "smaller" one. Incredible fat content this year, 1.5-2 inches on the rump and gallons of fat inside. I wanted to keep it for the grinding but lost the vote on that one, those guys prefer sawdust

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