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Thread: Where can I get Bud Helmerick's movie, "Edge of the Arctic Ice"

  1. #1

    Default Where can I get Bud Helmerick's movie, "Edge of the Arctic Ice"

    I posted this to a different area & did not get any responses so I'm posting here hoping some of you pilots might have known this gentleman.

    I was recently reading an old article in the June 2010 Alaska Magazine & noticed the Obituary for Harmon "Bud" Helmericks. I met him once at his home in the mid 90s on the Colville R delta in the dead of winter & was thoroughly impressed with this hospitality, knowledge, and his lifestyle. To say he lived a full life would only be telling a miniscule part of the story. I would surely like to see this movie about his life & family. Does anyone know where I can get a copy? Preferably DVD?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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  3. #3

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    [QUOTE=Float Pilot;1320269]http://www.alaskadispatch.com/articl...bud-helmericks


    Great article. I knew he was an author, but did not know of the books, guess I'll start reading there & maybe the publisher might know where to get a copy of the movie.

  4. #4

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    Amazingly, my library has about half the books he & his first wife authored. I'm looking forward to reading them & will report back.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Sadly, this is not the type of movie to have made the transition from cellulose analog to digital. Certainly would be cool to be able to view it.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
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  6. #6

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    I've just about finished "We Live in the Arctic" by Constance Helmericks, published 1947. This I believe is her second book, after "We Live in Alaska".

    Let me just say that I love non-fictional adventure books, and is what I most likely read. This is a very good read. I was intrigued with the next step of their adventure & did not want to put the book down. It is an adventure that starts in the summer in Seward on a train & ends in the depths of winter, way up the Alatna R. on skis & snowshoes. Travel in summer is by a wide bodied 14.5' canoe, down the Yukon & up the Kuskokwim.

    The title of the books should actually be "We are the Meat Eaters". They had a sizeable food cache starting out, but only about a quarter of what they would need for the trip (ultimately, they wanted to end up on the Arctic Coast in two years, spending the winter on the south side of the Brooks Range). They harvested quite a bit of game. Two black bears, a grizzly, two moose, several caribou, rabbits, grouse, fish, furbearers, ... This is a husband & wife team & they were both quite the workers to be able to travel that far & to ultimately pull their canoe upstream for a long ways up the Alatna R. when their old outboard gave up the ghost. They also built a cabin just in time, before freeze up. They really did not have proper clothing for those -40+ days, and had to learn a few tough lessons. There was also quite a bit of trapping in the winter months. Bud Helmericks was quite the woodsmans, hunter, & trapper. Seems like he had a zeal for that type lifestyle, nothing would stop him from his adventures. He also turned out to be quite a good teacher, and Constance in her own right was THE Outdoorswoman.

    I'm no spring chicken, but if I could convince my wife of doing a trip like this, we would be gone in a week. It's hard labor, but if it is a labor of love, who cares. What I like best, is you wake up in the morning & don't know what the day will bring. And there is little to no stress, at least the kind of stress the city brings.

  7. #7
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    [QUOTE=Kushtekaa;1325178]I've just about finished "We Live in the Arctic" by Constance Helmericks, published 1947. This I believe is her second book, after "We Live in Alaska". Let me just say that I love non-fictional adventure books, and is what I most likely read. This is a very good read. I was intrigued with the next step of their adventure & did not want to put the book down. It is an adventure that starts in the summer in Seward on a train & ends in the depths of winter, way up the Alatna R. on skis & snowshoes. Travel in summer is by a wide bodied 14.5' canoe, down the Yukon & up the Kuskokwim. The title of the books should actually be "We are the Meat Eaters". They had a sizeable food cache starting out, but only about a quarter of what they would need for the trip (ultimately, they wanted to end up on the Arctic Coast in two years, spending the winter on the south side of the Brooks Range). They harvested quite a bit of game. Two black bears, a grizzly, two moose, several caribou, rabbits, grouse, fish, furbearers, ... This is a husband & wife team & they were both quite the workers to be able to travel that far & to ultimately pull their canoe upstream for a long ways up the Alatna R. when their old outboard gave up the ghost. They also built a cabin just in time, before freeze up. They really did not have proper clothing for those -40+ days, and had to learn a few tough lessons. There was also quite a bit of trapping in the winter months. Bud Helmericks was quite the woodsmans, hunter, & trapper. Seems like he had a zeal for that type lifestyle, nothing would stop him from his adventures. He also turned out to be quite a good teacher, and Constance in her own right was THE Outdoorswoman. I'm no spring chicken, but if I could convince my wife of doing a trip like this, we would be gone in a week. It's hard labor, but if it is a labor of love, who cares. What I like best, is you wake up in the morning & don't know what the day will bring. And there is little to no stress, at least the kind of stress the city brings.[/QUOt I had the privilege of spending two nights in that cabin on the Alatna river in 2011. I rafted the river solo, all 184 miles, and never saw another person. It was one of the highlights of my life.

  8. #8

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    Perhaps you could call or email the curator of the Alaska Film Archives and ask if they know:

    http://library.uaf.edu/film-archives

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  10. #10
    Member Trakn's Avatar
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    Wow,,great watch! Thanks for the post.


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