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Thread: What size boat for 70/50?

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    Default What size boat for 70/50?

    I have a 1983 70hp Johnson with a jet foot. I need to find a boat to hang this motor on. The boat will be used for fishing/hunting and a normal load will be 2 people and gear, with an occasional third person.

    What size boat would be a good match for this motor? I like fishing out of 18' boats, but I think a wide 15' or 16' boat would be easier to turn around in narrow creeks.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by 70hptiller View Post
    I have a 1983 70hp Johnson with a jet foot. I need to find a boat to hang this motor on. The boat will be used for fishing/hunting and a normal load will be 2 people and gear, with an occasional third person.

    What size boat would be a good match for this motor? I like fishing out of 18' boats, but I think a wide 15' or 16' boat would be easier to turn around in narrow creeks.
    The shorter boat would be easier to turn around in a tight spot, but a longer boat will plane more weight and stay on step at a slower speed (better for the hunting load). Glen

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    Thanks for the input Mr. Wooldridge. Our hunting load in east TN only consists of a few shotguns and decoys, nothing like an Alaskan hunting load. I own an 1838 Go Devil and an 1848 prop tunnel boat. I am planning to build a boat with a jet tunnel for this motor. Is a narrow 18'er what I need? My gut says an 1860 is too much boat for this motor.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 70hptiller View Post
    Thanks for the input Mr. Wooldridge. Our hunting load in east TN only consists of a few shotguns and decoys, nothing like an Alaskan hunting load. I own an 1838 Go Devil and an 1848 prop tunnel boat. I am planning to build a boat with a jet tunnel for this motor. Is a narrow 18'er what I need? My gut says an 1860 is too much boat for this motor.
    Sorry, I didn't take note of were you were from. If we are talking about light weight riveted boats the 70 HP would do great on a 18 ft boat. Narrow would be faster, but wider would be more stable and do better with a load. Glen

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    Definitely don't go narrow, wider boats slide better on corners, carry more weight per foot length, get on step quicker, don't "auger down" when coming off step.

    Best boat I ever ran for weight and shallow performance was this ridiculously wide 16 foot riveted boat with a 40/30 yamaha two stroke. It would take two guys and gear anywhere and popped up on step in the smallest of holes.


    essentially, what Glen said, but I vote wide bottom. They should be a dime a dozen in TN.....

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    Thanks for the advice. I am going to have a welded boat, I have torn up too many riveted boats. When you say wide bottom, are you talking 48", 54" or 60" bottoms?

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    I'd say 54 plus. While running the little ripper I described above, a group of guides in the area had this really sweet looking welded rig, but it was really quite narrow. I asked to take it for a ride, and I am amazed they could run the river in that thing....it carved instead of slid, it didn't plane quickly, and when you did break it into a slide it would catch......that was exciting.

    Look at the specs on a G3 1756, would be a good match for what your motor can do.

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    The words cart before the horse comes to mind. Just playing with you I like wide seems to do better but I'm still mighty fresh.

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    1660 SeaArk Jet tunnel is what you want. High sides. I had a 1652 jet tunnel with a 50/35. Now I have an 1860 jet tunnel with a 90/65.

    Sobie2

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    Thanks for the suggestions. Do I need a console up front or can I sit on the back bench and run a tiller? I'd prefer the tiller but I don't know about spotting rocks.

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    I spot rocks just fine from my position at the tiller in the stern. You can stand up, or sit on an elevated chair if you need to. You might want to check out the rock proof boats site in Pennsylvania for ideas (they like the forward consoles). I have to haul stuff and need the open space.

    Sobie2

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    With a motor that size you would do fine with a tiller, either have an elevated seat, or sit on your tool box, or run one knee up (don't stand, it's unsteady and if you do, put the kill cord on your wrist).

    For real skinny water in an open skiff, you will get better performance and quicker response out of a tiller, too easy to get behind the curve when decisions start stacking up when using a console.

    I don't personally dig tunnels, but they have their place. They take away some from your planing ability and performance in my experience and if I need the foot to be above the transom, I probably shouldn't be running there. Others will disagree but that's my buck o five.

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    if the boat is light weight 18 footer fine. but if with console and full floor ,etc then maybe 16 footer better. but why build a boat for a 30 year old motor that is only going to crap out on you way up river.

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    Thanks everyone. I was thinking an open tiller boat would suit my needs but wanted to be sure. Flatbottom - old 70hp motors are a dime a dozen around here, I can always swap the foot if it blows, but I maintain my equipment and doubt it will give me any trouble.

    Catch It, I've gotta ask a real novice question here. How bad are rock strikes without a tunnel? We have alot of rock ledges that come up out of the river; it's not a smooth gravel bottom.

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    then carry another foot and setup for it with you. you will need it. if you are going where you get stranded away from help you have to have alot more than a boat with you. remember jet motors are run full out most times. old motors dont do well, but can function fine if you are lucky.

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